Monday, 9 April 2018

Sparks "Kimono My House" 1974 UK Glam Rock,Art Rock (500 Greatest Albums All Of Time Rolling Stone)


Sparks "Kimono My House" 1974 UK Glam Rock,Art Rock (500 Greatest Albums All Of Time Rolling Stone) 
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Lyrical wit is in abundance, magnified by Russell Mael’s soaring falsetto gymnastics. Failure with the opposite sex is a recurring topic, from the adolescent fumblings of Amateur Hour to the resignation of Falling in Love With Myself Again. It’s easy to see why the teenage Morrissey was a dedicated fan. The track that really grabbed the public’s attention was This Town Ain’t Big Enough For Both of Us, a classic stomper with a gravity defying melody. 1974’s Kimono My House is the sound of Sparks firing on all four cylinders, providing one of the most curious and comical albums of the ‘70s. ….~

Arguably one of Sparks’ best albums, 1974’s Kimono My House finds the brothers Mael (Ron wrote most the songs and played keyboards, while Russell was the singing frontman) ingeniously playing their guitar- and keyboard-heavy pop mix on 12 consistently fine tracks. Adding a touch of bubblegum, and even some of Zappa’s own song-centric experimentalism to the menu, the Maels spruce up a sleazy Sunset Strip with a bevy of Broadway-worthy performances here: as the band expertly revs up the glam rock-meets-Andrew Lloyd Webber backdrops, Russell sends things into space with his operatic vocals and ever-clever lyrics. And besides two of their breakthrough hits (the English chart-toppers “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for Both of Us” and “Amateur Hour”), the album features one of their often-overlooked stunners, “Here in Heaven.” Essential….by   … by Stephen Cook…~

If I had discovered Sparks four years earlier, it’s very likely that Kimono My House would be my favorite album. Because four years ago was when I was really first starting to get into music, and Queen was my favorite band. At the time, my belief was that the campier the band was, the better. When a singer spends more than half of his time in falsetto, greatness is the only possible result. 

It’s like the Bay City Rollers on every destructive drug in the universe, or bubblegum pop for the criminally insane. You have the in-your-face, throbbing pomp of “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us”, the waltzy tribute to eternal loneliness that is “Falling in Love With Myself Again”, and the many other similar keyboard-drenched ditties. A lot of it is quite witty and most definitely fun, as glam rock ain’t shit without blaring levels of roller-disco fun (except I can’t roller skate worth a lick, which is very depressing and not remotely fun… but I digress). It’s also incredibly ahead of its time. I mean seriously, to think that people were coming up with ideas such as tacky tigers back in 1974 is astounding. 

But as I said earlier, I would have liked this more if I had discovered it four years ago. It’s so grossly upbeat and over-the-top that no amount of tongue-in-cheek wit can allow me to endure this for more than a few minutes at a time. It’s like the relationship between a tired old dog (me) and a perpetually pepped-up puppy (Sparks). The puppy is bouncing off the walls and yipping in its high-pitched voice, while the old dog would do virtually anything to shut the little twerp up to get some sleep. Well four years ago, I would have been the peppy puppy, but these days I’m most definitely the boring old dog….by…Seattle Junkie Queen …~

Charging bitchy classy glam-punk-bubblegum full of childish pique, pre-oedipal selfishness, decadent sardonicism and absolutely the best pop lyrics since that Old Testament jivester had his run at the honeys. 

Not that Sparks are aiming for seduction, per se, thought their themes are about women, as well they should be, about women that trick you to sail off to the equator, leave you in a romance-speaking country, women you callowly look at when you’re trying to get you first lay at, say, 16, all types of them. Except for that bit about being ecstatic for finding someone’s wallet in the street. 

The music is cheap-sounding hyperdriven rock opera, galloping thumping primitivist drums madly offset by carneval organ, jerry lee lewis piano fills, post-Page pre-punk rip-roaring brittle thunder and a falsetto whose unnaturality leaves Prince cowering in shame in a cherry blossom grove of virgins n’ cream. Russel Mael’s vocals are a thing of beauty and clarity, his delivery one of tongue-in-cheek childish defiance melding into the regal showmanship that Mercury became so famous for, but he occasionally bares his teeth in a howl that references rockabilly, or should I say punkabilly. 

The songs falter a bit at the middle, as the repetition grates and the lyrics temporarily give way to sunny neurosis, but the energy levels remain high throughout, but the insane fusion of rock n roll and glam libretto on Complaints sets the mood for the two angry garage freakouts that follow and are unlike nothing you’ve ever heard. Intense, sophisticated, historically aware and absolutely unfettered by 70s layed backedness- Roxy Music, as intriguing and arcanely chic as they might have been, had nothing on this shit, sounded prog in comparison. Which brings me to my closing regret - there is nothing out there that sounds like Sparks, not even most of Sparks’ own output, quantitatively. 
But you’ve already been bought by the cover, haven’t you?….by…Cephka …~

As the electric piano rises out from the silence at the start of “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us”, and Russell Mael starts singing about “the thunder of stampeding rhinos, elephants and tacky tigers”, you can just tell this is something far removed from the norm. 
Since leaving America, the brothers Mael had assembled a new band, and started writing new songs. They’re still recognizable as the band of A Woofer in Tweeter’s Clothing, but…more focused, incredibly focused. The little imperfections in the sound are all gone, and now it is pure, distilled danceable glam rock, whether in impossible theatrical numbers such as the amazing “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us” (trust me, there is nothing, repeat, nothing, like hearing that for the first time) or equally impossibly perfect pop numbers like “Amateur Hour”, “Hasta Manana Monsieur”, “Talent is an Asset”, hell, I could list every track on the album if I so desired. But I’ll move on. 
The vocals are wonderful, Russell’s fantastic falsetto gliding through the baroque pop joys like some graceful bird in full flight. And the lyrics, the lyrics are worth more superlatives than I can type. Personal favourites (with a intimidating number of quotes left unsaid) are “Girls grow tops to go topless in/While we sit and count the hairs that blossom from our chins/Our voices change at a rapid pace/I could start a song a tenor and then end as bass” from Amateur Hour, a song about teenage sex, and “Do I qualify as dearly departed or am I/That sucker in the sky/The fall guy for the first and the last time” from “Here in Heaven, from the point of view of Romeo if Juliet had decided not to kill herself after he did, and, from "Hasta Manana Monsieur”, “Kimono my house mon amour/I am sure that this motion don’t need no accompanying words/Guess I was wrong because you’ve fled/Leaving me with my Michelin Guide and half-empty foreign bed”, wherein the narrator wishes he’d learned more foreign languages at school as he attempts to seduce a foreign girl. 
The only downsides I could find with this album was that the last track “Equator” runs a little too long, and maybe the verses of “Complaints” aren’t as good as the choruses. Everything else is top-notch. 
In conclusion, regardless of whatever kind of music you claim to be a fan of, you need to hear the Maels at their peak, because this level of quality is all too rare….by…At SwimTwoBirds ….~

It’s far too lazy to dismiss Sparks as an exercise in camp silliness, after all, it’s now an exercise which has gone on for almost four and a half decades and, if their recent collaboration with Franz Ferdinand on the brilliant FFS is anything to go by, they display no sign of running low on creative impulse, indeed, the music they have released since the start of the millennium is among their most vital and outright enjoyable of their long career. 

Back in the early 70s though, Sparks had recorded a pair of albums that struggled to make an impact. The turning point for them would be “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for Both of Us”, a song that would not only be their breakthrough hit, but accepted as their signature tune throughout their career. An appearance on Top of the Pops and one glimpse of Ron Mael’s 'tache later and they had seared themselves into the UK conscious, with the pop-kids loving them and their parents freaking out at the guy with the Charlie Chaplin moustache and his band mate with a voice so high it could shatter glass. That guy with with the high voice was Ron’s brother, Russell, and between them they continue to front Sparks to this day. 

Of course, it’s easy for the doubters to put Sparks commercial success down to nothing more than that iconic first appearance on Top of the Pops, but hey, isn’t that exactly what David Bowie did as well? 

Many would write off Kimono My House as “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for Both of Us” and nine tracks of filler, but that’s to overlook follow up hit “Amateur Hour”, as well as timeless tunes like “Thank God It’s Not Christmas”, “Talent Is an Asset”, and of course the closing “Equator”. Kimono My House is a fully realised, well rounded album, and while I may personally have a preference for their more recent material, you can’t deny it’s an outstanding musical statement. 

Kimono My House is an album on which Sparks expanded the horizons of art-rock beyond the hollow bauble that the likes of Roxy Music offered, and did so while fronting a solid rock band featuring an drummer with the winning moniker of Dinky Diamond. ….~


I badly want the backstory of the Sparks to involve a mad scientist’s attempt to clone Hitler, but it doesn’t work out and Ron Mael instead is the result. With the pressure on his back to become a genocidal dictator he rebels against his master and decides to form one of the most pivotal bands in the development of New Wave. Creating the musical soundtrack to fascism’s greatest foe, post-modern irony and general silliness. This is a musical in the making, and it helps that the Sparks produce the sort of music that would perfectly fit an off color musical. Their allegiance to Glam was obvious before, but it’s EVEN MORE obvious now! If that makes sense? Maybe what I’m getting at is that fundamentally with this album they dive so recklessly deep into the genre that they embody it to like almost a comical degree. But that’s ok, because this is perhaps a new type of Glam in the making. The egotistic glitter strut of Bowie, Bolan, Mercury, and Ferry? That’s another thing. This is also quite different from the harder Glam acts like the Dolls, Slade or Alice Cooper. So while it obviously shares a genus with most Glam (especially the former kind) it stands somewhat part for it’s oddball sense of humor and theater. And yes I mean theater, this is no longer really cabaret like that other Glam. Simply put, the Sparks are on to something. Their use of the keyboards increases with every release as well. See what I’m getting at? Oh of course you do, I already told you. More than nearly any act the Sparks are the proto-New Wavers to reference. Kimono My House signifies this role in tremendous levels, but it isn’t up here for that reason alone. No, I don’t do that. It’s up here for plain being a quantum leap in quality for the band. Honestly it took me a little to fully digest this, and I had a rough time with their first two releases. One might think a melodic fun album would be among the easy stuff, but the Sparks are as obtuse as possible about being a melodic fun band! The melodies aren’t immediately obvious, and yeah Russel Mael’s voice is something that might take some time to accept. It fits, but damn if he doesn’t 100% commit to sounding like a goofy hi-pitched clown man. Part of the mind enjoying the music keeps telling you “Hey this is pretty neat, if only that dude would shut up or sing like a normal guy!”. It’s actually a pretty good example of how they stand out, Glam of this sort is used to the sexier or at least croonier singers. That’s really the ego I mentioned earlier, how those four guys want to impress you, want to sound GOOD. Russel doesn’t care, he wants to impress upon the crazy vibe of the album. And that’s the challenge right there, you have to relearn how to listen to Glam to get with the Sparks fully. My point being that his vocals are the way it’s supposed to be here. To understand that is to start to understand the whole thing. And maybe from there you start seeing flashes of David Byrne, Mark Mothersbaugh, and the like. Plug all that into those songs, man are they good. What helps them stand out though isn’t even just the songwriting. It’s just how much more of a studio bound product the band has become. With lots of changes in their work schedule you can see how, they were now in the UK, with new players and a new producer, with Ron Mael taking full songwriting duty. Opportunity knocking hard like that has clearly resulted in them working for a super polished and busy sound. The detail in the sounds is just delicious, this lovingly made cheese here….by…Zephos …~

Ron and Russell Mael tried a curious experiment with their third album. Sparks had established itself in Los Angeles in the very early 1970s as a club act based on their deep appreciation for the early sixties Britpop acts, and in particular the Kinks. They had developed a following at the Whiskey-a-Go-Go, they had released two effective albums with their fellow bandmates the Mankey brothers (yes, the producer and later the Concrete Blonde member), they had had a very minor hit with “Wonder Girl”, and they had made some initial media breakthroughs. They had not, unfortunately, sold enough records to earn a living–remember, this was years before new wave bands like the Jam made a living from such homage to an era only eight to ten years removed. The Maels reacted with a daring gambit. They had not impressed America with their Britpop sound–so why not sell their Britpop to Brits? They promptly moved to London, hired a Britpop backing band, tilted the lyrics decisively into rapid-fire Gilbert and Sullivan territory, and changed the sound into, of all things– guitar-pop Kinks-drenched, ringing guitar, British 19th Century music hall singalong. The band used Russell’s fantastically melodic and piercingly high falsetto as the centerpiece and principal driving weapon of the affair. Kimono My House is the first of two resulting records based on this sound. The whole thing improbably works, making this one of the great underappreciated acts of pop genius released in its era. Ron Mael’s lyrics are laden with light opera humor, and are intelligent, contemporary, and indelibly odd. Lyrically, Sparks in this era sounds like the Residents might sound if the Residents wrote songs targeted at 12 year old girls. Russell Mael’s falsetto is one of those unforgettable things–never critically appreciated, and yet absolutely unique (an analogy might be made with Keith Emerson’s live work on keyboards spinning in mid-air during this time period). Kimono My House defies description–the Sweet’s “Ballroom Blitz” had a similar glampop sound, but Sparks was an altogether different thing. This album is as listenable 25 years after its release as it was when it made the Maels perhaps the most unlikely teenybop idols that Melody Maker ever produced. If you’re considering whether you might like Kimono My House, ask yourself the following questions: do you enjoy a band that knows how to parody itself and everything about it? do you like melodic power pop that does not take itself too seriously? do you enjoy an amusing lyric and a band that is willing to try something odd and fun? If your answers were “yes”, this is the CD for you. In hindsight, Cheap Trick soon thereafter sorted out how to take the Sparkseque humor and meld it into a wonderful cartoon-metal sound. But nobody did Kinks-as-music-hall-vaudeville as well ever again….by…..Robert H. Nunnally Jr….~

'KMH is, quite simply, the most invigorating, appealing rock 'n roll album that I can recall at the moment. It’s the kind of joyous, arresting work that makes you want to carry a cassette recorder around with you all the time so that you can play it for friends.’ (Robert Hilburn, L.A. Times, 1974) 

'Advocates…seemed prone to write impassioned 3 or 4 page letters… opponents seemed frustrated over what many apparently felt was a musical hoax…to write rather detailed commentary questioning not only the sanity of the group but of anyone who would praise it in print…While there have been several readers over the past 5 years who have said they wasted their money…no one had ever gone to the trouble and expense of mailing me the album to underscore his point. I ended up giving the album to a friend who in turn also gave it back.’ (Robert Hilburn, LA Times, 11 February 1975) 

'Sparks’ LP is an embarrassment of riches. That is its only flaw, and outside of that it is one of the albums of the year.’ (Stereo Review, November 1974: 'Recording of Special Merit’) 

'The album is still a mad, multi-coloured, fairground ride of a record, all invigorated, posturing, preening pop.’ (David Roberts, Q Online) 

'James Johnson is the most totally laid-back writer on this paper. When he blinks, that means hes exceptionally excited…the fact is, he’s just seen Sparks in concert and we’ve had to rent out a strait-jacket to prevent him swinging from the tops of lamp-posts and chasing policemen up trees…’ (New Musical Express, 29 June 1974)…~


This 1974 record from one-of-a-kind duo Sparks is like a sonic and aesthetic before-and-after line. Once crossed, music and culture could not possibly turn back. 
[On February 14 and 15, Sparks—backed by a 38-piece orchestra—will perform their 1974 masterwork in its entirety in downtown L.A.

Here’s how pivotal 1974’s Kimono My House is: Prior to it, no other single song collection had combined the baroque wit and grandeur of Gilbert and Sullivan with the brash ’60s power of The Who and The Kinks, the proto-punk of The New York Dolls and the Stooges, the ingenious art glitter of Roxy Music and T. Rex, the virtuoso derring-do of Frank Zappa, the propulsive stomp of Slade, and the bubblegum dynamics of Sweet—not to mention what Sparks themselves had already brought to the drawing board. 

The Los Angeles-based duo consists of the Brothers Mael: Ronald, the manic, Chaplin-mustachioed elder, who composes the songs and doesn’t so much play the keyboards as he does possess them, and Russell, the younger, of whom the term “frontman” seems insufficient and “swashbuckler” comes closer. 

Freak-pop provocateur Todd Rundgren discovered Sparks and produced their first two LPs, fitfully potent confections that invite comparisons to any number of rambunctious rock ’n’ roll rule-breakers of the day, although Old Grey Whistle Test TV host Bob Harris may have best nailed it by likening Sparks to “The Mothers of Invention meet The Monkees.” 

Kimono My House, though, is the album where Sparks put all the aforementioned influences together and, bolstered by their own combustive genius, charged forward—and, even now, have just kept going. Here is the very record where Sparks became Sparks. 

Consider Kimono’s opening track. “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us.” Swooping in on dreamlike electric piano, Russell Mael talks tough by singing of jealousy and zoo animals in a falsetto that Tiny Tim would require a tank of helium to reach. 

From there, Russell’s declaration of the title is followed by an actual gunshot ricochet, Gestapo boot beats, and fuzzy guitars set to raze any ear they can reach. In those first 30 seconds alone, Sparks simultaneously dismantles, one-ups, and supersedes the hyper-machismo of big, loud, bad boy rock circa ’74. 

The onslaught only intensifies as the song storms onward, commingling Old West tropes, battlefield percussion, bop-along bubblegum dynamics, and airy-fairy dandyism, all as the angelic-voiced fop hero smashes home to his rival that the girl is his, their local confines are too tight, and that “it ain’t me who’s gonna leave!”.With “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us,” Sparks lays forth the bridge connecting glitter to punk. Each successive song on Kimono My House serves as another plank moving forward, although not just to, say, The Sex Pistols (whose Never Mind the Bollocks was once proclaimed as rock’s greatest record by the Maels) but to an endless future where Ron and Russell continue to inspire. 
Among the vast array of artists to praise Sparks as a profound influence are the Ramones (in whose “Something to Believe In” video Sparks make a cameo), Faith No More (whose Mike Patton has performed with the Maels onstage), and Franz Ferdinand (who are presently recording with the brothers). That’s in addition to Kurt Cobain, Arcade Fire, Depeche Mode, Bjork, the Pixies, and They Might Be Giants. 
In fact, no less a Sparks fan than Paul McCartney even paid tribute by donning full Ron Mael regalia as a deadpan keyboardist throughout the music video for his 1980 hit, “Coming Up.”
In the 21st century, however, Sparks has had no greater champion than U.K. superstar Morrissey. Humanity’s foremost musical mope-meister has long opened his shows with Sparks videos and in recent years arranged an epic three-week concert run for the Maels in England in which they performed every one of their albums. (Sparks returned the good will via their 2008 ditty “Lighten Up, Morrissey.”) 
To discover the most direct connection between Sparks, The Smiths, and what Morrissey’s done since then, go directly to “Here in Heaven,” Kimono My House’s other supreme wonder on par with “This Town Ain’t Big Enough for the Both of Us.” 
“Here in Heaven” cheekily reveals the details of a lovers’ leap suicide pact gone wrong, sung from a boringly antiseptic afterlife by the deceased Romeo, as he was the only one to actually jump. Just imagine young Stephen Patrick M. (Morrissey before he was just Morrissey) first hearing Ron’s words: “Dear, do you often think of me/as you overlook the sea?/Do I qualify as dearly departed or am I/That sucker in the sky?”
Something unmistakably British does pulsate throughout not just Kimono My House, but almost all of Sparks’ work, which went on through the years to remarkably hop genres (ranging from Euro-disco to new wave to neo-classical, and more) up to an including 2009’s The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman, an opera commissioned by the government of Sweden (really). 
Sparks’ U.K. connection makes sense on one hand as Kimono and its comparably brilliant follow-ups Propaganda and Indiscreet were recorded there. Still, it’s also peculiar in that the Maels, who combined Eisenhower irony with glam-rock swagger and early on claimed to be the sons of Hollywood icon Doris Day, so entirely embody a distinct school of Los Angeles art, pranksterism, and high-vs.-low culture grappling. 
Regardless, as with Jack White and Jimi Hendrix, England embraced Sparks straightaway while their fellow countrymen have taken the better part of five decades to catch up. The Los Angeles Kimono My House shows next week provide a joyful opportunity for all involved to revel in this ultimate sardonic triumph. Go-ono their house…….by Mike McPadden …~

Dazzling its way into an early-to-mid-70s post-glam scene where smart, literate pop (10cc, Cockney Rebel) was already making inroads, Sparks’ breakthrough album is a punchier and more prosaic affair than the oddball image of Ron and Russell Mael might first have suggested. Prefaced by the near-chart-topping single This Town Ain’t Big Enough For Both Of Us, Kimono My House dared to throw everything into the pot, mapping out its own corner of the playground somewhere between Zappa and Ziggy. 
The trade-off between Ron’s elaborate keyboards and Russell’s mock operatic voice especially finds favour in the satirical go-getter tale Talent Is An Asset and the keen observations of adolescent courtship in Amateur Hour (“… girls grow tops to go topless in”). The rat-a-tat vocal delivery keeps pace with the maniacal melodies throughout, cramming countless lyrical ideas into 10 relatively brief songs. 
This double-vinyl 40th anniversary edition adds a second disc of home demos recorded by the brothers prior to signing to Island, and, though none of the seven songs made it onto Kimono My House, many turned up on subsequent releases. Barbecutie and Windy Day stand out, perhaps because their stripped-down acoustic guitar folk-y hues seem entirely at odds with the Maels’ default setting of intricately arranged flights of fancy. ….by Terry Staunton…Record Collector….~


Ah, the curse of the innovator!Sparks(Ron & Russell Mael) are one of those bands that always seemed to be a few years ahead of their time.Their grandiose,opera-tinged epic-rock sound was a profound influence on Queen(who once opened for Sparks).Rock fans cried foul when the duo teamed up with Giorgio Moroder and future Billy Idol hitmaker Keith Forsey in 1977 for 'No. 1 in Heaven’, the blueprint for Soft Cell and like-minded synth-and-vocal duos who clogged the charts a few years later.Cheap Trick doubled Sparks’ hunky-rock guy /irritated boffin image to great success, and Morrissey,Siouxsie & the Banshees,Depeche Mode and countless others have covered their songs.Despite the odd chart hit ,the band remain largely a cult item in their native America. 
After two little-heard albums for Bearsville,the Todd Rundgren-produced “Sparks”* and the follow-up,“A Woofer in Tweeter’s Clothing”(Helmed by Electric Prunes singer James Thaddeus-Lowe!),the Los Angeles-bred Anglophiles headed for England and signed with Island Records,who would release what are considered by many to be the bands’ best three albums. 
The first of these,'Kimono My House’(geddit?) kicks off in high style with “This Town Ain’t Big Enough For Both Of Us”.A soothing piano fade-in and Russell’s sotto vocal are rudely interrupted by an alarming 
pick-slide.Dive-bombing sideways gtr'n'bass riffs and dizzying turnarounds underscore a showdown between two rivals both intent on winning the same girl.Ron’s lyrics are hilarious,full of clever twists and bad puns-remarkable for such a young writer. 
Next up is 'Amateur Hour’, a sprightly number that uses a talent show as a metaphor for sexual awakening: 
“Girls grow tops to go topless in 
While we sit and count the hairs that blossom from our chins 
Our voices change at a rapid pace 
I could start a song a tenor and then end as bass” 
Brilliant! 
“Falling In Love With Myself Again” is a study in narcissism set to a bombastic waltz.Dinky Diamond(the best-named drummer ever!) excels. 
'Here in Heaven’ is a twist on the Romeo and Juliet theme,only here Juliet has broken her end of the bargain and poor Romeo is stuck in heaven without her.Once again,Russell astounds with his multi-octave vocal calisthenics. 
'Thank God It’s Not Christmas’ is up next and possibly the band’s finest moment.The oblique lyrics only add to the songs’ power.Dig the way the opening riff is re-cast in the songs’ third verse. 
Side two kicks off with 'Hasta Manana Monsieur’.Russell tries in vain to communicate with a non-English-speaking girl with predictably tragic results,buoyed by castanets and Leslied guitar. 
A young Albert Einstein’s doting parents are portrayed in 'Talent is an Asset’.The multi-layered vocals are truly astounding.It’s followed by 'Complaints’ and 'In My Family’, two of the albums’ less remarkable numbers, and finally 'Equator’, a tale of a jilted lover left standing with hands full of wilted roses and melted chocolate.The song spirals ever downward,finally breaking down to just honking sax and Russell’s haunting falsetto. 
'Kimono My House’ has everything you’d ever want in a rock album-great songwriting,witty lyrics,stellar musicianship,and a ginchy cover to boot,Every home should have a copy. 
*Sparks were originally called Halfnelson.Their debut was originally released under this name with a different cover. … by Dwight Fried, ..Head Heritage….~


Credits 
Kimono My House: 
Producer: Muff Winwood 
Engineer: Richard Digby-Smith, Tony Platt 
Mixer: Bill Price 
Vocals: Russell Mael 
Keyboards: Ron Mael 
Drums: Dinky Diamond 
Bass: Martin Gordon 
Guitar: Adrian Fisher 
Art Direction: Nicholas de Ville 
Cover concept: Ron Mael and Nicholas de Ville 
Photography: Karl Stoeker 
Artwork: Bob Bowkett


Tracklist 
This Town Ain’t Big Enough For Both Of Us
Amateur Hour
Falling In Love With Myself Again
Here In Heaven
Thank God It’s Not Christmas
Hasta Mañana, Monsieur
Talent Is An Asset
Complaints
In My Family
Equator

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