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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Twink “Think Pink” 1970 UK Psych Rock


Twink “Think Pink” 1970 UK Psych Rock
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As far as overlooked geniuses of the U.K. psychedelic underground go, the man known as Twink certainly belongs on the shelf alongside Kevin Ayers, Kevin Coyne, Syd Barrett, and Robert Wyatt. As drummer for the Pretty Things and, later, the Deviants, as well as being one-half of Shagrat with Steve Peregrin Took, Twink was integral in the creation of some of the U.K. psychedelic underground’s most brilliant artifacts. His Think Pink session contains the classic Twink tracks “The Sparrow Is a Sign” and “The Coming of the Other One,” which were cut with Steve Peregrin Took of Tyrannosaurus Rex fame. Incidentally, both tracks appear on the Shagrat album that was only officially released in 2001: Pink Jackets Required, which plays the sister album to the Twink solo outing in question. Think Pink is an incredibly varied album with no two songs resembling each other, but then one assumes an acid masterpiece like “Ten Thousand Words in a Cardboard Box” will stay on high rotation for at least a week on the stereos of most psychedelia fans, so overall album flow may not be such an issue. This is pure psychedelic acid rock of the highest order. If one can imagine a fusion of the Incredible String Band, Deviants, early Pink Floyd, and a fair dose of Twink’s heredity as a member of Tomorrow and the Pretty Things, you get an idea of what he was up to. Not known for doing things in halves, he shows little restraint in the assembly of a group designed to tear the roof of the psychedelic scene. The band was made up of the Deviants guitarist Paul Rudolph – the U.K. equivalent of Fred “Sonic” Smith – who provides the most astonishing fuzz freak-outs and arrangements on the album. Other players included Viv Prince; Wally Waller; John Povey; Victor Unitt; Deviants bassist Honk; John Wood of Tomorrow; and, of course, the not-to-be underestimated contributions from Steve Peregrin Took. Regardless of the connotations the term “psychedelic” carries with it, it’s not all Pink Fairies and Tolkien. Things get ominous and dark on “Fluid” and “I Remember Nothing”; then, by the first half of the album, the mind is expanded enough to take in side two, where the presence of Steve Took really starts to come into play. His brilliant “The Sparrow Is a Sign” is a psychedelic anthem that is worth acquiring the album for alone. Essential stuff, not to be missed by those following the U.K. underground psychedelic scene circa 1968-1972…. by Dean McFarlane …allmusic…~


No mere “Hipgnosis sleeve plus mellotrons equals greatness” gambit here; not a whit. For “Think Pink” is one trippy, hobbity mindfuck of the highest water. It’s a complex and varied album where no two songs are the same, but seem to be examples of sub-genres entire ALBUMS could be fashioned from. Come to think of it, it’s probably the last high-water mark of old-school psychedelia the moment before it gave up the ghost. And Twink had steadily worked his way through a succession of bands that by the time he was in The Pretty Things, making many musical acquaintances via The Pretties’ management, the Bryan Morrison Agency, who also handled The Deviants and Tyrannosaurus Rex. Soon enough they had performed enough gigs together to force Morrison to circulate a letter to these three bands requesting that they refrain from ever showing up at each other’s gigs ever again. Because if there was havoc to be caused, it WAS caused, and if there was none to be found, it would be located immediately. When Twink left The Pretties, he assembled a virtual roll call of London underground musicians: Viv Prince, Wally Waller, John Povey, Victor Unitt, The Deviants, Quiver bassist Honk, John “Junior” Wood (ex-Tomorrow) and Steve “Peregrine” Took. This album owes a grand debt to Paul “Black George” Rudolph for his uncredited arrangements and outstandingly effortless yet complex Stratocaster noise guitar burn-outs (which populate “Think Pink” in sheer and blissful abundance) are huge, soaringly hard and were barely hinted at on the third Deviants album. And the sessions yielded all things loose, crazy and hardened post-psychedelic. There is even a surprisingly manic funk out rare for even white dopers at the time as well as acoustic numbers that don’t sound the least bit obligatory, raga-based chants and group sing-alongs. Along with Rudolph, the other main inspiration for “Think Pink” was undoubtedly Twink’s pretty, blonde and Kohl-eyed girlfriend Silver, who appears on both the back cover and the album with an unforgettable vocal interlude. 

The album opens with “The Coming Of The Other One,” a vocal incantation as screeching backwards sitars, further vocal mantras and randomly hit percussion float through the air and clang in a dark, incense-filled basement from “Performance” with Steve Took emitting fear-inducing animal noises in a dark corner. It fades as sitars race back in time, and the air clears and gets brighter with the remake of Twink’s minnow-psych pop A-side for The Aquarian Age, “Ten Thousand Words In A Cardboard Box.” A celebration of “a thousand colourful shadows dancing around my head/Rejoicing to the waking of the dead…” over heavily recorded drums as Rudolph covers the drums and telephonically-phased vocals with underpinning streams of pink cirrus clouds at daybreak noise/guitar. But Rudolph winds up shanghai-ing the piece into a soaringly free-noise hurricane as he peels riff after riff out of his bottomless Strat. “Standing Tiptoe On The Highest Hill” is a chilly, overcast autumn morning with swelling mellotron, muted guitar and somber drums, bursting your heart when the grim (yet sung angelically-echoed) lines come in and it dawns on you that this is the acoustic grandfather of Joy Division’s “Decades.” Backward noise/guitar streaks by Rudolph transform the whole piece into a coiled and curling jam out that cuts out to let the song descend quietly back into the sand and it’s seaweed-strewn grave. “Fluid” ends the album side, an instrumental stripped bare of everything but genitals. Slow bass, guitar and drums crack out an undulating and repeating rhythm as Twink and Silver coo to each other, barely touching and letting their vocal vibrations do the work of a thousand fingers. It’s Joy Division again, only a decade earlier and this time it’s “I Remember Nothing.” This is just side one, but side two is just as fantastically charged up and out there, reaching its apex with the Took-damaged, “The Sparrow Is A Sign.”…The Seth Man…Head Heritage….~


With the crazy intro “The Coming of the Other One” Think Pink begins like a bad science fiction dream. “A thousand colourful shadows dancing round my head, rejoicing to the waking of the dead, dancing to the beat of a skinless drum while the deaf man sings, along with the dumb. Ten tin soldiers they mime in tune with three madmen waiting for a full moon. The hounds and the huntsmen chased by the fox ten thousand words in a cardboard box. There he goes on another voyage of his own delusion never knowing where the next thought will take him.” “Ten Thousand Words in a Cardboard Box” is a fabulous psychedelic outing. And “Tiptoe on the Highest Hill” is unarguably the most lyrical and the best song on the album. “Standing tiptoe on the highest hill watching dawn give birth to the light I cried. Seeing a thief steal a swan from the lake, he didn’t know it was wrong, I cried. Seeing the sea kiss the sand on the beach, a man drowned there last week, I cried.” But to my chagrin there is enough of some just unreasonably disharmonious stuff on the album…..~


Twink’s first solo album is a very interesting and also a quite diverse package. He is best known for being a member of some of the classic psychedelic rock bands of the 1960’s like for example The Pretty Things and Tomorrow. 
The material on this album is highly psychedelic and experimental and I can say that most of the time this album sounds awesome. It gets a bit weaker towards the ending but especially the A-side kicks ass on this record. The second side is good as well but I don’t like “Three Little Piggies” that much. In my opinion it’s the weakest cut on the record. Luckily “The Sparrow Is a Sign” saves the ending. 
It’s easy to recommend this LP for everyone who consider themselves as psychedelic rock fans. I’ll rate this album with four stars. Very solid psych rock record by Twink….by…CooperBolan …~


“Think Pink” arrived at that most exciting time in 1970 when psychedelic bands were stretching the boundaries of their sound, tiring of the confining popular music norm, while not willing to immerse themselves into the upcoming progressive rock movement. So what you have here is a highly imaginative album, filled with true psychedelic sounds. The fuzz guitar is divine throughout. Albums like this would normally be found in Sweden or Germany at this time, rather than England, and constitutes one of my favorite styles of music. It’s chaotic, but never out of control. And there are actual songs here, adding to the allure….by…ashratom …~


Incredibly psychedelic freak-rock. There’s really only one misstep on the album, Three Little Pigs, which while for the first minute is cute in its acid-bathed dreaminess, gets horribly annoying after that minute. While it may only be one misstep, it’s a huge one that detracts greatly from the album. While the album as a whole isn’t going to ever be branded a classic (too much farting around with the trippy atmospheric stuff), Ten Thousand Words in a Cardboard Box is one of the best songs of the early seventies…by…Dipsoid …~


An extrememly psychedelic album from the famous drummer of other psychedelic bands. Aided by Steve Took and members of Deviants and Tomorrow this album shows varied psychedelia at its best. The opener “Coming of Other One” is a rather boring song with chanting. “Mexican Grass War” is not very good, and suffers from too much psych noodling. “Rock n Roll the Joint"is a better, funkier instrumental with a good pounding rhythm section. "Suicide” is more acoustic and yet spacey at the same time. The best song is the acidic “Ten Thousand Words in a Cardboard Box” with some fantastic guitar courtesy of the Deviants lead man. The last two tracks, stronly influenced by Steve Took have some value, especially the extreme trippiness “The Sparrow is the Sign.” Highly recommended for any psych fans….by..Brandting …~


This is one of the greatest psych albums of all time.The first side is awesome.Tiptoe On The Highest Hill is totally trippy.Imagine Jimmy+Can+Brainticket.Too bad that at the backcover the girl should be more preaty….by..twink…~


If you where a fan of the deviants, pink faries, most mark farren projects and just total tripped out 60s british psyche then i am sure you must own a copy of this 1970 classic by now, this comes with a very comprehensive booklet telling you everything you need to know about twink as per 1970 when this was released, i have been enjoying this blown out record now for over 25 years and i feel this reissue a couple of years back is one of the better ones on cd becouse of the remastering and the inlay with amazing photos and bonus tracks of coarse, ive been a fan of most of the stuff twink did in the 60s starting with the in crowd and then onto the pretty t hings for a bit, twink never seemed to stay in one place back in those days but he always stuck close to the nomads of larry wallis and the late great mick farren, this is probably one of the most blown out psyche records from this era however i have many others as well, twink sure left his mark back in these days, basically this is a totally tripped out acid/lsd influenced record that i feel in order to make you had to be doing lsd 25s or something like that BUT regardless i will say once again if you liked the pink faries, the deviants, the pretty things or even neon peral or the please then you just cant go wrong here, basically 45 years ago this record gave reality to the then expression TUNE IN, DROP OUT AND HELL NO WE WONT GO!!!!!!!!!!! i feel this record best represents that era best and i think this was one of twinks best projects, i dont understand why twink is a muslim now but hey whatever turns you on i guess ( but that ideology is for the FREE WORLD not most islamic states!!!!!!!!!!!!! anyway smoke a fat one or take a drag and enjoy this record from not for from a half century ago!!!!!!!!!!!!!!…by… Edward J. mccarthy Jr….~


This did slip into my vinyl collection by accident. I knew Twink was part of the anarchic rockers Pink Fairies but living in remote New Zealand in 1971 did know of this solo release. So at the only then decent record store in Auckland-Taste this was nestled in the bargain bin. And bargain it has been, with the CD turning up in early JBL (Australia’s) shelves in Brisbane (go figure)-and when they had an interesting range of music not found elsewhere. 40 plus years later, it is still playable. As other reviewers have noted there are two stand out tracks “Ten thousand words in a cardboard box” and “Tiptoe on the highest hill”. They are classics deserving more air time than crap by the Eagles, Doobies et al. “Think Pink” show cases a number of Fairies associates ably providing back-up and their own unique licks such as the inclusion of the very good Canadian guitarist Paul Rudolph. So it is psychadelia era but closer to prog rock, with some well constructed songs and sufficient mayhem of interest and a good companion to the Pink Fairies “Never Never Land”. Only “Three little piggies” has not stood time’s test-well even on first listening, it quickly wore thin. But at 3.15 minutes who can complain. But overall worth a five star rating, a great unknown classic…by…“Belgo Geordie”…~


You may not recognise the name John Charles Alder, but his musical DNA is already deeply ingrained within these pages. Drummer, percussionist and all-round looner Twink, whose nickname was bestowed by his waggish friends because his mass of (naturally) curly hair suggested a 1960s home perm product, thumped the tubs for psych maestros Tomorrow, kept time for the Pretty Things around the time of SF Sorrow and later became one half of the twin-kit power train of the Pink Fairies. Somehow amongst all this collective activity Twink also found time to record his only “solo” album, recorded in July 1969 and released on Polydor the following year. Besides being engaging in its own right, Think Pink is historically notable as perhaps the last hurrah of genuine old-school UK psychedelia. 

Twink was a prominent member of the unique musical scene that sprang from the Notting Hill hippie enclave of the late sixties, characterised by a strong communal music-making spirit that placed enthusiasm above virtuosity and evinced a propensity for playing free concerts at every possible opportunity. The music was inevitably pharmaceutically influenced and displayed a reluctance to let go the elements of freakbeat and psychedelia, long after the more highbrow practitioners of those genres had progressed to the gentility of prog-rock. The likes of the (Social) Deviants, the Pink Fairies and Hawkwind retained a penchant for high volume, pounding rhythms, ultra-fuzzed guitars, simple, repetitive chord structures and lyrics of the most lysergic variety, and the musicians would meld and interchange seamlessly at each others’ live jams and recording sessions. 

Think Pink, coming between Twink’s involvements with the Pretties and the Fairies, not surprisingly features contributions from the former’s John Povey, Viv Prince and Vic Unitt and the latter’s Paul Rudolph and Russell Hunter, as well as John “Junior” Wood from Tomorrow, John “Honk” Lodge from Junior’s Eyes and numerous other local acquaintances. Twink’s chief compositional collaborator was erstwhile Tyrannosaurus Rex conga-thumper Steve Peregrine Took. This motley crew, together with their various mind-expanding substances, produced a rambling collection of wigged-out chants, whimsical nonsense rhymes, wry fuzzed-up instrumentals, cross-legged acoustic workouts and genuine psych gems that defies any homogeneous description but will bring a nostalgic tear to the eyes of any former freak-culture adherent (if you can remember being there, that is). Production was by the Deviants’ mainman Mick Farren, and although production quality is pretty good it still sounds as if a hell of a party was enjoyed whilst the recordings were going down. 

The album states its intent on the opener “The Coming Of The One” which simulates an acid trip more closely than anything else I’ve ever heard, with whacked-out wailings backed by backwards sitars and tablas. The cover of Twink’s own “10,000 Words In A Cardboard Box” from his Aquarian Age days is far, far heavier than the original and features the first of many examples of downright Stratocaster/Big Muff abuse from Rudolph. “Tiptoe On The Highest Hill” has a similar feel to the Floyd’s “Careful With That Axe, Eugene” but offers Mellotron and various contrasting guitar sounds, whilst the following “Fluid” features Twink’s lady Silver on orgasmic moans (it’s better than that makes it sound, honest). “Mexican Grass War” fades in with a sinister military snare drum march and random guitar noise and builds to a percussion tour-de-force, while the anarchic “Three Little Piggies” is as silly as it sounds and could have been Syd Barrett on even more acid. Like I said, the whole package defies easy description (though the estimable Julian Cope described it splendidly as “one trippy, hobbitty mindf*ck of the highest water”) but remains relentlessly listenable to folk of a certain age and disposition. 

The only CD reissue I’ve been able to find is clearly a bootleg on the Collector’s Digitally (sic) Recordings imprint from somewhere behind the former Iron Curtain. Somehow, however, I don’t think Twink and friends would be all that concerned…..Rising Storm review…~


Gritty psychedelia, quite ahead of it’s time. 
TWINK is essentially John Charles Alder and with the help of various members of the British psychedelia scene he recorded and released this fine album in 1970 (although the recording quality and music are firmly rooted in the 60s). 
‘The Coming of the Other One’ starts off our journey and is the most psychedelic song on the album, it’s really out there and one interesting thing to note is the similarity that it bears to later krautrock acts with the ethnic percussion and sitar as well as spoken word parts (focusing on the apocalypse in the year 1999, a novel concept now that year has passed). 'Dawn of Magic’ is another real highlight, a short song of chanting and building, very intense. 'Tiptoe on the Highest Hill’ provides us with some great jamming and sparse soundscapes. Mexican grass war is quite a unique song with a marching motif and various percussion along with tympani and yelps and guitars coming in and out of the mix. Suicide is a very raw and melancholy investigation of the dark side of the mind, made even more so by the fairly upbeat nature of the main part of the song, contrasted with the spacey reverberant vibraphones. 

The production on this album is fantastic (disregarding the fact that it’s quite gritty and raw due to the technology available), it always seems very rich and dense and there are some very interesting delays and reverbs present which is a formidable achievement given the resources available to achieve those sounds back then. 
Think Pink is a great little gem that’s well worth investigating by any psychedelia fan, kraut fans will find something to enjoy here too…by…by FruMp …~


Twink might sound like a twisted band name whose first (and only) album is a losy gem in UK proto- psych/prog, but it’s really John Adler’s first (and only) solo album. Indeed the “touche-à-tout” drummer has been present on the London scene ever since 63, passing through the ranks of The Deep Beats, Tomorrow (where Steve Howe played guitar) and The Pretty Things (holding the drum stool for that band’s legendary concept album SF Sorrow) and kick-starting the Pïnk Fairies. Quite an achievement, making Adler/Twink an inevitable actor of the 60’s underground scene. So by the end of that decade, Twink gathered in the summer of 69 a bunch of buddies from The Deviants, Tomorrow, Pretty Things and even Steven “Peregrine” Took from Tyranosaurus Rex to make what is a solo album that sounds like a very solid group. Indeed, very few solo albums have this kind of cohesiveness or soul or even experimental/groundbreaking force. Though recorded in mid-69, the album didn’t get released until the next year on a red-coloured vinyl disc (now ultra sought-after) on the Polydor label. 

Not only does the album title hint at pure psychedelia, but even the bucolic sleeve artwork hints a strong sense of adventure. And the sonic results are way beyond the expectations induced by the sleeve, too. Adler’s songwriting (only three tracks are co-written) is absolutely mind-boggling, and obviously, the main musical participants were quite in phase with Twink’s wavelength. BTW, Twink’s lead vocals are also very psychedelically professional. I can only imagine what kind of awesome vegetables were consumed during the album’s construction. The ten tracks made of wild instrumentals and poetry-laced tunes will send you in such a long strange trip that you won’t need any substance assistance. 

Right from the freaky and semi-improvised Coming Of The Other One’s opening note, you know that you’re in a fifth or sixth dimension, and it’s not Cardboard Box (from a previous Aquarian Age incarnation single) that will ease your worried ears and soul. Yes, your sanity is being challenged, and even possibly attacked, by some of the wilder soundscapes of the era, including soaring and screeching fuzzed-out guitars (courtesy of Pink Fairies’ Rudolph) and demented drumming and percussions (courtesy of Adler, Took and Viv Prince). Povey’s Mellotron, Wally’s piano, John Lodge (Moody Blues) or Junior Wood’s bass round up the normal instrumental section, but there are some rather unusual tweaks, sonic gizmos and studio wizardry that impedes on your aural comfort. Though there are some incredible peaks like the lengthy semi-instrumental Fluid closing the A-side, not all tracks are of the same ilk or quality, especially on the flipside. The very percussive Mexican Grass War and Three Litle Piggies are not only over-staying their welcome, but they lack the same kind of interest, probably because it’s not a well-thought-out lunacy-laced improvisation. The short Suicide track brings an acoustic side to the album’s electric quagmire. Overall, the flipside largely fails to confirm its alter-ego’s excellence. 

The Sunbeam CD reissue holds a bunch of bonus tracks, all of them except one being different (and sometimes interesting) takes of the album tracks. The sole exception being Good Wizard (part of a previous incarnation Aquarian Age single), hence the whole bonus package is only moderately enhancing the album. The weird thing is that after Adler’s most artistic success Think Pink, he seemed to hit a much rockier (read stonier and rougher) road and seemingly failed to capitalize on his 60’s achievements in the following decades. He would resurface again in the Pink Fairies and a very short (half-gig) with Syd Barrett. Not much has been heard from him since then, except for a late-80’s stint with neo-psych band Plasticland. He’s now apparently a born-again religious dude, but that shouldn’t let you overlook the man late-60’s musical genius achievements, which rank among the wildest and groundbreaking of the era. And this album epitomizes the man’s aura, and is one of the era’s all-too-forgotten gem….by…by Sean Trane ….~


Twink is the toy piano-centered project of Boston-area keyboardist Mike Langlie. After playing keyboards in numerous goth and industrial rock bands (such as Vitriola), Langlie partially abandoned the world of synthesizers and began to make music on his accumulated collection of toy pianos. He was helped out by friends, such as Steven Cerio (illustrater for the Residents), Clayton Scoble of Francine, Rick Hansen of Plastic Nebraska, as well as members of the local goth scene. Twink, which combined Langlie’s toy pianos with synthesized drumbeats and a variety of novelty instruments, was issued by Dyspepsidisc in 2002, and came packaged with an illustrated storybook. ~ Jesse Jarnow….~


First ever vinyl release of the original 1969 MONO mix of this psychedelic masterpiece by Twink (Tomorrow/Pretty Things/Pink Fairies etc), which was prepared before the more widely known stereo mix, and originally intended for release as part of Decca Records’ Nova series. 
Also includes as a special bonus, the Aquarian Age 7" single recorded in 1968 by Twink and John 'Junior’ Wood with Mark Wirtz, right as their time in Tomorrow was ending, and just prior to Twink joining the Pretty Things in time to play on their classic LP, 'SF Sorrow’. essential listening. 
A mainstay of the British psychedelic movement, singer/drummer Twink was born John Alder, first surfacing in 1963 as a member of the Colchester-based Dane Stephens and the Deep Beats; when the group signed to Decca the following year, they adopted the name the Fairies. Rechristened Twink, Alder turned up in 1967 as a member of the seminal UK psych band Tomorrow, appearing the following year on their lone LP before forming the equally short-lived Aquarian Age, which disbanded after just one single, “10,000 Words in a Cardboard Box.” He next joined the Pretty Things, appearing on their acclaimed rock opera effort S.F. Sorrow before exiting their ranks in 1969, at which time he began work on his solo debut, 1970’s Think Pink. The sessions led to the formation of the Pink Fairies, which Twink founded with members of the psychedelic combo the Deviants; after completing their 1971 debut Never Never Land, he left the lineup, returning to action the following year in Stars, a trio featuring legendary Pink Floyd alum Syd Barrett and bassist Jack Monk. Stars’ career proved remarkably brief — Barrett walked offstage halfway through their debut live appearance and did not return — and Twink spent the better part of the decade accepting infrequent session dates, also participating in a 1975 Pink Fairies reunion before finally issuing the solo EP Do It (With the Fairies) three years later. Despite a prolonged absence from the studio, Twink continued touring and joining in the occassional Pink Fairies reunion during the years to follow, and in 1989 he issued You Need a Fairy Godmother, a live record cut with the neo-psych band Plasticland; Mr. Rainbow appeared a year later…..~


Ο John 'Twink’ Alder ήταν και είναι μία από τις πλέον αυθεντικές και σημαντικές φιγούρες της βρετανικής σκηνής των 60s. Ένας από τους καλύτερους ντράμερ που ανέδειξε η freakbeat/mod και στη συνέχεια ψυχεδελική σκηνή, υπήρξε - μεταξύ άλλων - μέλος των σχετικά βραχύβιων αλλά ιστορικών Tomorrow (1967) και των κορυφαίων Pretty Things κατά την καλύτερη ίσως περίοδο τους, αυτή του S.F. Sorrow (1968). Το καλοκαίρι του 1969 λίγο πριν φτιάξει τους ιστορικούς Pink Fairies, ο Twink σκάρωσε την πρώτη του προσωπική δουλειά, το υπέροχο Think Pink. Στο άλμπουμ αυτό συμμετέχουν μερικά από τα σημαντικότερα μέλη της βρετανικής underground μουσικής κοινότητας. Εκτός φυσικά από τον ίδιο τον Twink, έχουμε τον Paul Rudolph (The Deviants, The Pink Fairies, Hawkwind) στην κιθάρα, τον Steve Peregrin Took (Tyrannosaurus Rex, Shagrat, Steve Took’s Horns) επίσης στην κιθάρα, τον John 'Junior’ Wood (Tomorrow) στο μπάσο, τον Wally Allen (The Pretty Things) στο πιάνο, τον John Povey (The Pretty Things) στο σιτάρ και στο mellotron, ενώ στο κομμάτι “Mexican Grass War” ο «τρελάρας» Viv Price (The Pretty Things) κάθεται στα ντραμς. Την παραγωγή του δίσκου ανέλαβε ο ευφυής Mick Farren (The Deviants) και το συνολικό αποτέλεσμα είναι απλά εξαιρετικό. 
Σε καμμία περίπτωση δεν νοείται σοβαρή ψυχεδελική δισκοθήκη χωρίς αυτό το άλμπουμ. Απ’ τα καλύτερα μουσικά τριπ!….~


Twink, Pearls Before Swine, what’s gotten into 2017? The reexamination of excellent reissues of the outer edges of ’60s psychedelic music continues. The man called Twink (aka John Alder) was a founding member of such luminaries as The Pretty Things, Tomorrow, The Deviants, and The Pink Fairies. He then went on to form a very short lived band with Syd Barrett in the post-Floyd years (Stars). Twink’s tenure in The Pretty Things lasted through their S.F. Sorrow days, but he left before the release of Parachute. It’s following this period that he recorded Think Pink with members of what would become The Deviants alongside rogue members of The Pretty Things and Steve Took of Tyrannosaurus Rex. 

The album, though commercially released, was really a warm up for the coming of The Pink Fairies. Members Mick Farren, Twink and Steve Took along with the addition keyboardist Sally Meltzer would form the original (though not album version) of that band. Twink’s lone solo outing would, however, exemplify his standing as one of the lights of the UK underground rock scene. He was known, as many at the time were, more for his stage antics than his adept playing. Still he managed to know the right people and work the right angles to become integral to the core of ’60s psychedelia. As such Think Pink is full of indulgently chugging riffs, glorious fuzz breakdowns and effects touches for ‘the heads.’ It’s about as quintessential a snapshot of the frayed edges of that scene as could be captured. 

There are no singles on the LP, there’s nothing that’s overtly catchy about the album and while that might be construed as a commercial weakness in hindsight it ends up its strength, feeling more on the pulse of what might have been working in clubs than what’s often known as canon of the period. This new reissue reinstates the original mono mix that was intended for Decca’s release. Bound to run out to the most ardent collectors, but it’s a great curio of the time for sure. Recommended to pick it up if you can! …by Andy ….~


Solo record ex-drummer “Tomorrow” and “The Pretty Things” John Alder, better known as Twink. Recorded solo twinks actively assisted by his musician friends and former colleagues from the London underground scene. Twink himself acted as the principal author of the material, vocalist, drummer, was responsible for the sound effects and some where he played acoustic guitar. Colleagues were the beloved Twinkie - Silver Darling, bassist “Junior’s Eyes” - John “Honk” Lodge, ex-bassist “Tomorrow” - John “Junior” Wood, former percussionist “Tyrannosaurus Rex” - Steve Peregrine Took, ex-guitarist “Edgar Broughton Band” - Vic Unitt, ex-drummer of “The Pretty Things” - Viv Prince, ex-members “The Deviants”: guitarist Paul “Blackie” Rudolph and vocalist Mick Farren. And also: active participants “The Pretty Things” - keyboardist John Povey (here he played on the Mellotron, and sitar) and bass guitarist Wally Allen (for some reason the piano). All of this motley company nekorotko called herself “The Pink Fairies Motorcycle Club & All Star Rock & Roll Band”. Approximately the same composition, they have participated in the recording of solo Mick Farren “Mona - The Carnivorous Circus”. Sam Farren made ​​here nominal producer records and “read” in one track (“Rock And Roll The Joint”). It is thanks to Mick found the money to pay for studio time. Recording session took place in July 1969 at two studios, first in the “Recording Sound Studios”, then - in the “Decca Studios”. In general, the creation of the album took about 20 hours. Some of the material on the album was the song, and the instrumental part (they are more or less alternate with each other). Upon completion of work on the record, Twink and Farren decide to celebrate this thing by Mick money squeezed out of the heads of “Sire Records”, ostensibly to pay for the services of session musicians, and set off in the company of Steve Tuck, Syd Barrett (Syd Barrett - former leader of Pink Floyd ) and a few other friends, revel in the clubs of London. In the process, they looked at “Speakeasy”, which just hosted the presentation of “In The Court Of The Crimson King”, which resulted in a funny and bad (for “Crimson”) curiosity. Twink remembers: “In fact, we sabotaged the whole event. I was inadequate. We drank champagne nemerenoe number ordered by Tuck and threw Mandrax (mandrax - a powerful sedative), brought her friend Sid - Iggy Eskimo (Iggy The Eskimo - whose nudes can be seen on the cover of barrettovskogo "The Madcap Laughs”). Therefore, performing “King Crimson”, I moved to head off to climb onto the stage, grab the microphone and crap their music in full, ask to play something from Chuck Berry. Looking back, I can say that I was very wrong then, “In The Court Of The Crimson King” - a great album, and now I love it! Such is the irony of fate. “… Sam album, dreamy name” Think Pink “was released in May 1970, on two labels:” Polydor Records “- in Europe and” Sire Records “- in the United States. Part of the circulation, to match the name, was published on pink vinyl. Shortly before the album’s release (October 1969) of the musicians "The Pink Fairies Motorcycle Club & All Star Rock & Roll Band” (namely, Twink, Took, Blackie, Farren and Darling), gave a concert at the University of Manchester, playing a few compositions of the “Think Pink”. They were joined by two other former members of “The Deviants” - bassist Duncan “Sandy” Sanderson and drummer Russell Hunter. Then, in December 1969, they took part in recording a solo album of his ex-leader - Mick Farren. This record will be called “Mona - The Carnivorous Circus” (in honor of the song Bo Diddley) and as “Think Pink”, will be released in May 1970. Successfully transferring their studio time between the stage, they decide to finally form a rock band, to settle up, a little heavier sound and shortened its name to “Pink Fairies” ….~

Tracklist 
A1 The Coming Of The One 5:30 
A2 Ten Thousand Words In A Cardboard Box 4:30 
A3 Dawn Of Magic 1:44 
A4 Tiptoe On The Highest Hill 5:19 
A5 Fluid 4:08 
B1 Mexican Grass War 5:30 
B2 Rock And Roll The Joint 2:32 
B3 Suicide 4:26 
B4 Three Little Piggies 3:15 
B5 The Sparrow Is A Sign 2:24 

Credits 
Bass – Honk (3), John Jnr Wood* 
Drums – Viv Prince 
Effects [Vocal], Vocals, Percussion, Guitar [Rhythm], Horns – Steve Peregrin Took 
Guitar [Lead] – Victor Unitt 
Guitar [Lead], Acoustic Guitar, Percussion [Chimes] – Paul Rudolph 
Percussion, Effects [Vocal], Handclaps – The Pink Fairies Motorcycle Club And All Star Rock And Roll Band 
Piano – Wally Allen 
Producer – Mick Farren 
Sitar, Mellotron – John Povey 
Vocals, Percussion – Boss Goodman* 
Vocals, Tabla, Drums, Effects [Vocal], Congas, Acoustic Guitar – Twink (4) 
Voice – Knights Of The Fairy Sword, Mick Farren


Discography 

Solo 
Think Pink – album (Sire Records, 1970 – recorded July 1969) (re-released – Sunbeam, 2013) 
Apocalipstic / He’s Crying – 7" single (Twink Records, 1986) 
Space Lover – 12" maxi-single with 5 versions of the song: Rock 'n’ Roll No. 1; Rock 'n’ Roll No. 2; Psychedelicised; Instrumental; Percussed (Twink Records # TWK 2, 1986) (as Twink & The Fairies) 
Driving My Car / War Girl – 7" single (Twink Records, 1987) 
Kids Aid / Instrumental – 7" single (Twink Records) (as Children Of The World - composed by St Benedict’s School music teacher Adrian Queen in 1986, all profits going to Cafod to support famine relief in Africa) 
Psychedelic Punkeroo / Seize The Time – 7"/12" single (Twink Records, 1990?) 
Mr. Rainbow – album (Twink Records, 1990) 
Odds & Beginnings – part compilation album (Twink Records, 1991) (featuring former Fairies colleagues Dane Stephens and Mick Weaver) 
Festival of the Sun – live album (Twink Records, 1995 – recorded 1993) (with Nik Turner, as Pinkwind) 
Purple Haze – live album (Twink Records, 1996 – recorded 1995) (with Nik Turner, as Hawkfairies) 
Out of the Pink into The Blues – album (Twink Records – or HTD Records?, 1996?) (“recorded live at the Bridge from mid seventies till eighties”, as Mouse & Twink: Fairies) 
Pleasure Island – album (Twink Records, 1996) (with Paul Rudolph, as Pink Fairies) 
No Picture – album (Twink Records, 1997) (with Paul Rudolph, as The Hawk Fairies) 
The Lost Experimental Recordings – album (Get Back Records, 2000 – recorded late 60’s to early 70’s) 
Think Pink II - album Sunbeam Records, 2015 
With The Fairies 
Don’t Think Twice It’s Alright / Anytime at All – 7" single (Decca Records, 1964) 
Get Yourself Home / I’ll Dance – 7" single (HMV, 1965) 
Don’t Mind / Baby Don’t – 7" single (HMV, 1965) 
With Santa Barbera Machine Head 
Blues Anytime Vol. 3 – various artists (three tracks) (Immediate Records, 1968 – recorded 1967) 

With Tomorrow 
My White Bicycle / Claramount Lake – 7" single (Parlophone Records, 1967) 
Revolution / Three Jolly Little Dwarves – 7" single (Parlophone Records, 1967) 
Tomorrow – album (Parlophone Records/Sire Records, 1968) 
50 Minute Technicolor Dream – album (RPM Records, 1998 – recorded 1967) 
With The Pretty Things 
S.F. Sorrow – album (Columbia Records/Rare Earth Records, 1968) 
The Pretty Things/Philippe DeBarge – with Philippe DeBarge, album (Ugly Things Records, 2009 – recorded 1969) 

With Aquarian Age 
10,000 Words in a Cardbord Box / Good Wizard Meets Naughty Wizard – 7" single (Parlophone Records, 1968) 
With Pink Fairies 
The Snake / Do It – 7" single (Polydor Records, 1971) 
Never Never Land – album (Polydor Records, 1971) 
The compilation cd’s The Golden Years: 1969–1971 (Cleopatra Records, 1998), Mescaline and Mandies Round at Uncle Harry’s (NMC, 1998) & Do It! (Total Energy, 1999) all include live tracks and radio sessions from 1969/1971, most featuring Twink. 
From The Vaults (a.k.a. Odds & Beginnings Volume 2) – album (Get Back, 1999, credited to Twink) includes some of the Pink Fairies tracks released on the above-mentioned compilations, plus some Twink solo material. 
The Lost Experimantal Recordings 1970 – album (Get Back, 2000 – recorded Winter 1969–1970) 
The Never Never Land And Think Pink Demos – album (Get Back, 2001 – recorded Winter 1969–1970) 
Live at the Roundhouse – album (Big Beat, 1982 – recorded 1975) 
Kill 'Em and Eat 'Em – album (Demon Records, 1987) 
Chinese Cowboys: Live 1987 – album (Captain Trip Records, 2005 – recorded 1987) 

With The Rings 
I Wanna Be Free / Automobile – 7" single (Chiswick Records, 1977) 
The Rings live at the 100 Club – (about 30 minutes in length, recorded before the single was issued, only released on cd reissue of Twink’s Odds & Beginnings album, 1995) 

Others 
Mona – The Carnivorous Circus – with Mick Farren album (Transatlantic Records, 1970 – recorded December 1969) 
Do It '77 / Psychedelic Punkeroo / Enter The Diamonds – with Twink & The Fairies 12" EP (Chiswick Records, 1978) 
You Need a Fairy Godmother – (with Plasticland, live album, Midnight Records, 1989) 
One Hundred Miles Below – (with Magic Muscle, live album, Big One Guitar, 1989) 
Magic Eye – (with The Bevis Frond: Bevis & Twink, album (Woronzow, 1990) 
You Reached For The Stars – (with the Technicolour Dream, album (Sunbeam, 2013)

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