Tuesday, 22 May 2018

Beaverteeth "Beaverteeth" 1977 US Southern Rock,Country Rock,Soft Rock


Beaverteeth  "Beaverteeth" 1977 US Southern Rock,Country Rock,Soft Rock
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One of the more talent, if overlooked 1970s and 80s-era Southern rock bands, these guys had an interesting history that most folks were completely unaware of. In 1970 music engineer Rodney MIlls raised enough money to build a music studio in the Atlanta suburb of Doraville, Georgia. Known as Studio One, Mills the decided he needed a house band and quickly rounded up a collection of local talent including local players Barry Bailey and Paul Goddard, Buddy Buie and guitarist J.R. Cobb (both former members of The Classics IV), as well as ex-Candymen keyboardist Dean Daugherty, singer Rodney Justo and drummer Robert Nix. 

Serving as the Studio One house band the group played on a stream of 1970-71 releases by acts like Bonnie Bramlett, Al Kooper, Joe South, B.J. Thomas, and a late inning version of Dennis Yost and the Classics IV. 

Continuing their sessions work, the band somehow found time to record a follow-on LP, but not before original singer Rodney Justo decided to tender his resignation. Increasingly frustrated by the band’s lack of financial reward (being told the band was going to cut some tracks for a kiddy cartoon program apparently pushed him over the edge), Justo headed off to New York and stints as B.J. Thomas’ band leaders, an in-demand jingle writer/singer, a couple albums with the band Beaverteeth and a real job working for a Southern beverage distributor. Originally hired as an engineering assistant at Studio One, Ronnie Hammond was subsequently brought in as Justo’s replacement. 

In spite of the personnel shaek-up,1972’s Buddy Buie produced “Back Up Against the Wall” proved more consistent and rock-oriented than the debut. Exemplified by tracks like ‘Cold Turkey Tenn.’, their cover of Joe South’s 'Redneck’ and the title track Hammond’s likeable voice proved a nice match for the band’s blend of pop, blues and Southern rock moves. While nothing here was particularly original, the performances were all professional and worth a couple of spins. Probably the most overlooked album in their catalog (okay, maybe that distinction went to the debut), this one displayed a laidback charm that they never managed to recapture. Highlights included the pretty leadoff ballad 'Wrong’, 'Superman’ and 'What You Gonna Do About It?’. Elsewhere Decca tapped the album for a single in the form of 'Conversation’ v/w 'Cold Turkey, Tenn.’ (Decca catalog number 7-40059). While the band hit the road in support of the album, absent a breakout single the LP did little commercially. …~



Ah, Rodney Justo … one of my favorite vocalists. Nah, he’s never achieved the national recognition he deserves, but that shouldn’t cast any doubts on the man’s talents. 
Unless you’re now in your 70s, or you’re a hardcore music fan, it’s doubtful you’ve ever heard of The Candymen. Shame, since they were a truly talented mid-'60s band, that actually came close to national success. Anyhow, Justo was the band’s lead singer. Justo was also the original lead singer for The Atlanta Rhythm Section. He handled vocals on the band’s first studio album, splitting with the group prior to the release of 1972’s “Back Up Against the Wall.”   If you believe the stories, Justo was unhappy with the band’s lack of commercial success and their management teams decision to have the band record music for a cartoon program.
Freed from ARS, in 1972 Justo headed to New York where he was hired as B.J. Thomas’ band leader.
During the same timeframe brothers David and John Rainey Adkins had formed the band Beaverteeth along with bassist Jimmy Dean and singer/drummer Charlie Silva. Beaverteeth were playing clubs throughout the Florida panhandle and Southern Alabama when, needing a touring band for Thomas, Justo recruited them for the job. They stayed with Thomas for the next three years, splitting up when Thomas hired a new management team. Beaverteeth then headed back to their native Dothan, Alabama. Original singer/drummer Silva was subsequently diagnosed with cancer and replaced by Larry Hunter and Justo on vocals. The following year bassist Dean left the band, replaced by Jeff Cheshire.
Signed by RCA Victor, the band made their recording debut with 1977’s “Beaverteeth”. Self-produced, the album offered up an odd mixture of conventional southern rock, pop moves, and an occasional nod to more contemporary musical influences (synthesizers and dance rhythms). As you might guess, it wasn’t the greatest mix you’ve ever heard. That was unfortunate since with four of the five members contributing to the writing chores, these guys were quite talented. Justo remained a first-rate singer, capable of handling everything from '20s-styled ballads ('Where No Man’s Been Before’) to hardcore Southern rockers ('Dixie Fried’). Exemplified by tunes like 'Sacred Harmony’ and 'I’m calling’ he remained one of the best Southern rock balladeers. Elsewhere, collectively the band were quite strong; probably as capable as The Atlanta Rhythm Section. From my perspective, their big creative mistake was trying to showcase their sheer versatility. At times it almost felt like you were listening to a wedding band promotion tape, with the group trying to prove they could handle virtually any genre that the audience might request. Their cover of Carl Perkins 'Dixie Fried’ was a killer Southern rock tune. 'You Wanna Go To Heaven (But You Don’t Wanna Die)’ was a nice horn-propelled slice of funk. 'Hope’ was tasty Mike Nesmith-influenced country-rock. In contrast, 'The World’s Really Flat’ sounded like a good Badfinger tune. They really could handle it all, but you were ultimately left to wonder who these guys really were…..Bad Cat…..~


Credits 

Backing Vocals – Jay Scott (tracks: A1, A3), Laura Scott (2) (tracks: A1, A3) 
Bass, Vocals – Jeff Cheshire 
Drums, Vocals – Larry Hunter 
Guitar, Vocals – John Rainey Adkins 
Horns – Jay Scott (tracks: A1, A3), Laura Scott (2) (tracks: A1, A3) 
Lead Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals – David Adkins 
Lead Vocals, Guitar – Rodney Justo 





Tracklist 
A1 I’m Callin 5:13 
A2 Just Another Local Band 3:47 
A3 You Wanna Go To Heaven (But You Don’t Wanna Die) 4:27 
Where No Man’s Been Before (Heartaches) (1:53) 
A4a Where No Man’s Been Before
A4b Heartaches
A5 Dixie Fried 3:31 
B1 Sing For You 5:10 
B2 Sacred Harmony 3:58 
B3 Hope 2:37 
B4 The World’s Really Flat 3:10 
B5 Where Does Love Go (When It Goes Away) 3:09 

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