Friday, 4 May 2018

Brainbox “The 3Rd Flood” 2011 Dutch Prog Blues Rock


Brainbox “The 3Rd Flood” 2011 Dutch Prog Blues Rock
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Brainbox is a Dutch rock group from the late 1960s/early 1970s. The band was founded in Amsterdam by guitarist Jan Akkerman[1] , drummer Pierre van der Linden and singer Kazimir Lux (Kaz). Their debut single was “Down Man”, which established their progressive blues sound. They had several hit singles in the Netherlands, including “Between Alpha and Omega”, “Doomsday Train”, “Reason to Believe” and “Smile”. In late 1969, soon after they released their first album, Akkerman left to join Focus, later recruiting van der Linden as well, then Brainbox bass player Cyril Havermans. 

They were replaced by guitarists Herman Meyer and Rudie de Queljoe and drummer Frans Smit. Meyer was later replaced by John Schuursma. After Kaz Lux left Brainbox in 1971, popularity waned and they split up in 1972. Lux reassembled the band in 2004 (though without Akkerman) and they performed in the Netherlands. In 2010 and 2011, the band performed again and recorded a new studio album, The 3rd Flood…wiki…~



Brainbox again with a new album, how is it possible. Old scratching back to work. At first you think that actually can never reach the level of the sound that made them so unique. You get your songs in your head as Summertime or Dark Rose. Nothing can match this. 
But now that I am listening to the sounds of their latest album, I may be back in time. Even though the voice of Kaz has handed something in. That should not spoil the fun. The whole may sound better than the songs they recorded years ago. 
To be on the safe side, I had looked up and listened to an old vinyl disc from my collection. You can still hear Jan Akkerman in his best days. 
But that is fantastic here by Rudie de Queljoe and John Schuursma. I can not say anything else. The bassist Cees van der Laarse, a bassist unknown to me, plays his party in a great way. Nothing to complain about. And then of course the engine of the band, drummer Pierre van de Linden. He has not forgotten his skills for a long time 
At the first tones of the opening number 200% you already recognize the sound of Brainbox. The sassy voice of Kaz Lux quietly begins to find its way. The Brainbox sound is great. It’s like you hear Reason to believe every moment. But that is, of course, already quite a few years ago. 
The guitarists John Schuursma and Rudi de Queljoe almost forget the tones of Jan Akkerman. 
The 3rd Flood, the second and the title track is of course also very recognizable, but here the guitarists and drums are cleverly woven into the swinging melody. Pierre van de Linden is completely in place again with his great drum work. It seems as if it has not been affected by time. No the opposite is true. It seems like he has become better.
Part of the land of no beyond, the third number starts very modestly. Kaz Lux floats above the instruments, as it were. I think it took a lot of study hours to get this song right on the CD. The bassist Cees van der Laarse makes his mark very good here.Return to Intaca, number four of this cd, is actually the epitome of Brainbox. A quiet Kaz Lux, who perfectly puts his melody line between the guitars, drums and bassist. It seems here that time has stood still. 
Burnadine, again number five, is a good song in the audience. At first I thought I knew something about it, but with critical listening it was really new. 
An unexpected backing from the guitarists is a bit gospel-like. 
Jump, a really pure Brainbox number. With a striking Pierre van der Linden. He pushes the band to a beautiful performance, as it were 
Deserter, another own song, starts with a dark voice from Kaz. But gradually the song leans on the slow melody line. A really slow song from Brainbox. 
You would almost sing along. That song is so good to hear. 
My Babe, a Willie Dixon number, goes like a train. Here you can hear that Kaz’s voice is no longer what he once was. In the old days he could be slightly higher. But the guitar playing here is really of a gigantic high level. Even though the song could have been played a bit quieter for me. It is like an express train that passes by. 
Miners, again number nine. Here you can hear Pierre van der Linden at his best. Especially if you listen carefully to his perfect way of drumming. He uses the whole drum set and not just the everyday. It is as if he rolls over the drums here, as it were. 
Reincarnation the next song does something strange in the Brainbox euvre. But you should actually hear this song a couple of times. That is with the whole CD case. The more you listen, the more you recognize and the better you will find it. The guitar playing here makes Jan Akkerman completely forgotten. 
Krontjong, an old indonesic melody line and good number in the audience. But here too I wonder if this is part of the Brainbox repertoire. Perhaps at the request of Rudi de Qeuljoe? 
See thru girl, starts as usual. An almost stopping Kaz Lux and then the melody line in combination with the guitars. 
Not now. In the beginning it can be compared to the sound of the former Cream. Driving drums, a running bass part and good guitar work 
White Christmas, number fourteen starts calmly. Here too, a slow start. Normally this would be the last number of the CD, but not the Brainbox. 
Here are fifteen songs on the silver disc The closing number Ice age is absolutely not an icy number, but a real Brainbox valve. All in all a real AANRADER….by… Hans Wolven….~


Have bought the album but so far I’m not really satisfied with this purchase. Musically it’s all right, though Kaz Lux’s voice is no longer what it used to be, but especially the songs do not seem to catch up with the old work. The largest part is written by Lux and that well is rich in old work. Those first four songs were already on his solo albums and that goes for the instrumental Krontjong E. At most the opening track has improved. The fifth song, Burnadine, looks like Toast from Echoes and Countrybutions. Somewhere, I get the feeling that I can just as well set up an album by Lux. And then there is a number of songs that do not taste good to me, after several listens the album starts to be more and more disappointing. The nicest songs are See Thru Girl and Not Now that contain a bit more tempo. The cover My Babe also contains quite a bit of tempo but in style it looks like Dark Rose, and you can listen to it better. Not much that can charm me here, or it has to be bass and drums. 
The new album by Jan Akkerman, Minor Details, suits me better than The 3rd Flood….by…B.Roberston…~




Tracklist 
1 200% 4:16 
2 The 3rd Flood 4:44 
3 Part Of The Land Of No Beyond 3:15 
4 Return To Ithaca 5:01 
5 Burnadine 2:44 
6 Spring 3:52 
7 Deserter 2:48 
8 My Babe 2:02 
9 Miners 2:50 
10 Reincarnation 5:57 
11 Krontjong E 3:01 
12 See Thru Girl 3:04 
13 Not Now 3:56 
14 White Xmas Blues 5:26 
15 Ice Age 4:59 



Line-up / Musicians 

Pierre van der Linden : Drums 
John Schuursma : Guitar 
Eric Bagchus : Bass 
Jan Akkerman : Vocals, Guitar, Bass, Lute, Piano 
Kaz Lux : Vocals, Guitar


Discography 

Studio albums 
Brainbox (1969) 
The Best of Brainbox (1971) 
Parts (1972) 
To You (1972) 
A History (1979) 
Brainbox (1979) 
The Very Best Brainbox Album Ever (2002) 
The Last Train live (2004) 
The 3rd Flood (2011) 

Singles 
“Down Man” / “Woman’s Gone” (1969) 
“Sea of Delight” / “Amsterdam, the First Days” (1969) 
“Summertime / Dark Rose” (1969) 
“To You” / “So Helpless” (1970) 
“Between Alpha And Omega” / “Cruel Train” (1970) 
“Doomsday Train” / “Good Morning Day” (1970) 
“The Smile (Old Friends Have a Right To)” / “The Flight” (1970) 
“Virgin” / “Mobilae” (1971) 
“Dilemma” / “If You Could Only Feel It” (1971) 
“A Part of Me Is a Part of You” / “When I Was Poor” (1971)

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