body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

Monday, 28 May 2018

Caetano Veloso "Transa" 1972 Latin Pop,Samba,MPB one of the best Brazilian albums


Caetano Veloso  "Transa" 1972 Latin Pop,Samba,MPB  one of the best Brazilian albums 
full soundcloud
https://soundcloud.com/danielbranco/caetano-veloso-transa-full-album

full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/69Kai0bceQ2B9LIkaRD8xN

full all discography on spotify

https://open.spotify.com/artist/7HGNYPmbDrMkylWqeFCOIQ


A true heavyweight, Caetano Veloso is a pop musician/poet/filmmaker/political activist whose stature in the pantheon of international pop musicians is on par with that of Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, and Lennon/McCartney. And even the most cursory listen to his recorded output since the 1960s proves that this is no exaggeration. 
Born in 1942 in Santo Amaro da Purificacao in Brazil’s Bahia region, Veloso absorbed the rich Bahian musical heritage that was influenced by Caribbean, African, and North American pop music, but it was the cool, seductive bossa nova sound of João Gilberto (a Brazilian superstar in the ‘50s) that formed the foundation of Veloso’s intensely eclectic pop. Following his sister Maria Bethânia (a very successful singer in her own right) to Rio in the early '60s, the 23-year-old Veloso won a lyric-writing contest with his song “Um Dia” and was quickly signed to the Philips label. It wasn’t long before Veloso (along with other Brazilian stars such as Gal Costa and Gilberto Gil) represented the new wave of MPB (musica popular brasileira), the all-purpose term used by Brazilians to describe their pop music. Bright, ambitious, creative, and given to an unapologetically leftist political outlook, Veloso would soon become a controversial figure in Brazilian pop. By 1967, he had become aligned with Brazil’s burgeoning hippie movement and, along with Gilberto Gil, created a new form of pop music dubbed Tropicalia. Arty and eclectic, Tropicalia retained a bossa nova influence, adding bits and pieces of folk-rock and art rock to a stew of loud electric guitars, poetic spoken word sections, and jazz-like dissonance. Although not initially well received by traditional pop-loving Brazilians (both Veloso and Gil faced the wrath of former fans similar to the ire provoked by Dylan upon going electric), Tropicalia was a breathtaking stylistic synthesis that signaled a new generation of daring, provocative, and politically outspoken musicians who would remake the face of MPB. 
This was a cultural shift not without considerable dangers. Since 1964, Brazil had been ruled by a military dictatorship (a government that would rule for 20 years) that did not look kindly upon such radical music made by such radical musicians. Almost immediately there were government-sanctioned attempts to circumscribe the recordings and live performances of many Tropicalistas. Censorship of song lyrics as well as radio and television playlists (Veloso was a regular TV performer on Brazilian variety shows) was common. Just as common was the persecution of performers openly critical of the government, and Veloso and Gil were at the top of the hit list. Both men spent two months in prison for “anti-government activity” and another four months under house arrest. After a defiant 1968 performance together, Veloso and Gil were forced into exile in London. Veloso continued to record abroad and write songs for other Tropicalia stars, but he would not be allowed to return to Brazil permanently until 1972. 
Although his commitment to politicized art never wavered, Veloso went from being a very popular Brazilian singer/songwriter to becoming the center of Brazilian pop over the next 20 years. For decades he kept up a grueling pace of recording, producing, and performing and, in the mid-'70s, added writing to his résumé, publishing a book of articles, poems, and song lyrics covering a period from 1965 to 1976. In the '80s, Veloso became increasingly better known outside of Brazil, touring in Africa, Paris, and Israel, interviewing Mick Jagger for Brazilian TV, and in 1983, playing America for the first time. (He sold out three nights at the Public Theater in New York with shows that were rapturously reviewed by then-New York Times pop critic Robert Palmer.) This steady increase in popularity occurred despite the fact that Veloso’s records were extremely hard to find in American record stores, and when one could locate them, they were expensive Brazilian imports. Still, the buzz on Veloso grew, thanks in part to Palmer, Robert Christgau, and other critics writing about pop music outside of the contiguous 48 states. But Veloso never seemed bothered by his low profile outside of Brazil, and his work over the years, even after he became a more well-known international pop figure, remained challenging and intriguing without being modified for American (or anyone else’s) tastes – that is, Veloso sang in English (most of his recorded work is sung in Portuguese) when he felt like it, not because he had to sell more records in America. He hung out with fairly trendy New York musicians (Brazilian native Arto Lindsay and David Byrne), but never made a big deal about it. Veloso was one of the rare musicians who was popular, sold a lot of records (at least in Brazil), and was a certifiable superstar, but never self-aggrandizing, narcissistic, or overly concerned with how hip he was. 
Even when he approached the age of normal retirement, Veloso showed no signs of slowing down. After his 1989 recording Estrangeiro (produced by Ambitious Lovers’ Arto Lindsay and Peter Scherer) became his first non-import release in America, Veloso’s stateside profile increased significantly, reaching its highest point with the release of 1993’s Tropicália 2, recorded with Gilberto Gil. A brilliant record that made a slew of American Top Ten lists, Tropicália 2 proved once again that Veloso’s talent (as well as Gil’s) had not diminished a bit. His early-'90s recordings, Circuladô, Fina Estampa, and Circuladô ao Vivo (the latter of which includes versions of Michael Jackson’s “Black and White” and Dylan’s “Jokerman”), were uniformly wonderful, and in the summer of 1997 Veloso embarked on his largest American tour to date. 
Two years later, Veloso was the subject of an extensive, flattering portrait in Spin on the eve of the American release of his acclaimed 1998 album, Livro. In 1999, he released Omaggio a Federico e Giulietta, a tribute to auteur Federico Fellini and his wife, actress Giulietta Masina. He also won a Grammy for the Best MPB Album for 1998’s Livro at the first annual Latin Grammy Awards. At the beginning of the new millennium, Veloso delivered a live bossa nova album in collaboration with poet Jorge Mautner, the spirited Noites do Norte, and the songbook album A Foreign Sound. In 2006, Veloso returned with Cê, a typically diverse and interesting album co-produced by his son Moreno. Veloso took some time out to tour and begin another book; he released Zii e Zie in 2009 on Nonesuch through World Circuit. Live at Carnegie Hall, a record documenting a very special collaborative concert he and longtime friend David Byrne gave in 2004 as part of Veloso’s residency at the renowned venue, was issued in 2012, a year that also saw the release of Abraçaço, the third part of the trilogy of studio albums – Cê and Zii e Zie being the first two – that placed the artist in the company of much younger players. The album was issued in North America by Nonesuch in March of 2014. The following year Veloso and Gilberto Gil embarked on a major world tour together called “Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música” which translates to “Two Friends, a Century of Music.” With each artist celebrating a remarkable 50-year career, the tour was commemorated by a live album recorded in their native Brazil called Dois Amigos, Um Século de Música: Multishow Live. The extensive double album was released in April 2016 by Nonesuch. ~ John Dougan……~


Released in 1972, Transa was recorded by Caetano Veloso during his exile in London, England, shortly before his return to Brazil. The sound of '70s electric rock predominates, fused with Brazilian rhythms and percussion, berimbau sounds, and his own violão playing. Several lyrics in English, and also in Portuguese, carefully avoid direct reference to politics, which may be found disguised in all songs, especially in the melancholic and depressed images of the poem by Gregório de Matos, “Triste Bahia,” for which Veloso wrote the music. “It’s a Long Way” also makes ciphered references to the political situation and was broadly played in the '70s. The broad use of pontos de capoeira (music used for accompaniment of capoeira, a martial art developed by Brazilian slaves as a resistance against the whites) can also be understood in that sense. The album also has “Mora na Filosofia,” a classic and beautiful samba by Monsueto that scandalized people with its rock rendition…. by Alvaro Neder…allmusic….~
Transa, Caetano’s fourth album, was released upon his return to Brazil in 1972. A leading member in the “Tropicalia” movement, named after a Helio Oiticia art installation, Caetano, as well as other musicians, writers, and artists were jailed and kicked out of Brazil for their establishment challenging ethos. There, along with Jards Macale, Caetano was able to soak in the English rock scene, thus fermenting a fusion of sounds that erupts forth in this album. 

Unlike the works of many other Brazilian artists of the early 70’s, it doesn’t sound like undercooked psych rock. The mixture of rock instrumentation with classic Brazilian poetry and musical styling make it sound as if Chuck Berry was a Bahia native. The English lyrics only reveal to western listeners what a great lyricist Caetano was in his prime, second only to Buarque. The way his voice bends and soars adds another layer of beauty to these songs. Dylan and Leonard Cohen wish they had made an album as buoyant, joyous, and fresh as this. 
This is the sound of a man in transition, a man who sees that the rock and roll lifestyle isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, a man at his peak as a band leader and singer/songwriter. All credit can’t go merely to Veloso, as the 2008 180-gram reissue (which sounds immaculate), doesn’t refer to the contributions of Jards Macale (guitar), Tutti Moreno (percussion), and Gal Costa (voice, “You Don’t Know Me”) 
A true masterpiece of Brazilian rock. Must listen….by…ganjafacevillain ….~
A master class in Songwriting executed perfectly. The English speaking songs are the initial stand outs to an uncultured baboon like me but it’s not long before the Portuguese sang numbers burn into your brain. In fact, it’s the mix of the two that really keep this interesting. What could be seen as simply a great folk album turns into a more aesthetic experience as cultures collide to create something with a character all of it’s own. 
As always Velso sounds like a man untroubled by anything. Even when he sings “I know one day I must die”, he still manages to sound totally at peace. He sounds like a man you’d like to know. 
'Transa’ is quite simply an album you need to hear. A melodic masterpiece….by…weekend Cigar Smoker ….~


Caetano never considered himself as a musician of great qualities. He often says for himself that he`s just a guy that likes to make some music just for fun, oftenly diminishing his abilities in comparison to such great talents like Joao Gilberto, Jorge Ben, Milton Nascimento and so on… 
Sure… melodies on this album are not that complex, often time they come up as repetitive, but one cannot help himself to just feel Caetano´s voice; full of emotion, honest and direct. Some words he just repeats over and over and over again till they just stay with you, and won´t get out of your mind. And I presume that is where the title of album comes from. 
Since it was recorded in London, nostalgia is oozing from his voice, as well as music, even in some more upbeat tracks. Obviously Caetano was not that comfortable with his new setting, showing his angst with prejudices in “You Don’t Know Me”, and criticizing rock lifestyle with the classic line from ˝Nostalgia˝: “You sing about waking up in the morning but your never up before noon”. 
Music often seems unconscious, improvisational, due to Caetano´s often mixing of English and Portugese, and it makes a certain comfort zone - a dreamlike state you dont want get out of. Last track it up perfectly, making the melancholy not that overbearing, and marking a begining of a new phase, a brand new start, as a last album in the exile…by…Kupusa …~


The highest rated album (#190) on my contacts top 500 that I had not yet heard before today. I was not overly impressed with the C. Veloso albums that I was familiar with but I trust my Taste Tribe unfalteringly and in this instance that faith is rewarded capaciously. Simply put music does not come any more enjoyable, vibrant, life-affirming and wonderful than this, and you get the feeling that if it did it would have been included. Music this simply “good” defies my metaphorical crutches….by…unearth …~


Transa is an album I constantly return to. Today, it is finally a pleasure to listen to the thing properly on a slab and not via some cheap download. If you are anything like me, you get all of your shit done (ie. dishes, laundry, washroom cleanup, et al.) then you crank your stereo and you listen to an album properly on vinyl. Maybe you listen to a few other albums and then you investigate all of the shit that you’ve downloaded out of curiosity on your computer, or on shittier speakers. Anyway, for months I focused on the Brazilian music that this site introduced me to, just listening to this on my imac and wondered why I liked it so much. And this beguiling piece of Brazilian rock history became the focal point of my musical obsession. I am still sure that it is great, even one of the best of all time - but why? What is it about Transa? Is it a dinky set with two throwaways at the end, or something like another reviewer puts it, a compilation of Caetano’s darker songs, half-sung in English and prepared for that market? 

Having very little to do with the type of music that I usually play (country-rock, folk) or what I would like to play (jazz), I ponder why it appeals to me. Maybe Transa appeals because it almost sounds like a difficult Van Morrison record to me in places, where no matter what language he’s singing (English or Portuguese) it seems like he mechanical repeats phrases or bits of lyrics. At any rate, the repetitive nature of the record almost gives it that feeling of motion, and I would argue that is indeed the theme of Transa. Its a weird-un in places, but of course his next record took things a bit further into the weirder, actually it took things to an avant-garde musical territory that I am less interested in. Shades of that on Transa as well, but the overall, relatively coherent material here is much easier to digest, particularly when the backbeat is as joyous as it is on Nine Out of Ten. 

A quick listen to this song could make one think that maybe there was not really much that could be taken from the lyrics of Caetano at this stage. I have found this notion to be a false one. The lyrics seem to be very much about his exile, but less transparent than they were on the third album. Like his last album, the majority of the lyrics are sung in English, true, but via very much more literal use of language, wherein he told everyone explicitly that he was very blue indeed. On this followup (his first properly titled album, the rest were eponymous releases) he seems to have straightened out his thinking somewhat and reverted back to the poetic finesse that he seemed to have in spades when he wrote in his native tongue. 

So this is the first album that Caetano released when he returned after exile from Brazil, and seemingly it was well received upon release in his home country. Much like the other great Brazilian poet/songwriter of the era, Chico Buarque, Caetano hid his criticism of the government behind his use of lyrics. In the opening track, the brilliant “You Don’t Know Me,” he again uses English to make a simple point that seems to be that some people have setup a wall against Caetano and they will never hear him anyway. From what I understand of my translation of the Portuguese lyrics in this song, he makes a simple declaration of his origins - as if to tell everybody in his homeland that he is back, and it doesn’t really matter if you don’t like him, he’s gonna continue to provoke. After the aforementioned (and probably my fav) Nine Out of Ten, Triste Bahia emerges as the true set piece for the entire album. I say that it is worth the price of admission for having Ma Amazon the thing for me for Christmas. Over nine minutes and some very sympathetic playing by a funky bassist and some percussionists, Caetano takes us back to his homeland with simple melodies and droning folk guitars. Its the Brazilian equivalent for me to Venus in Furs, all mood and passion with the artist revealing as he did on Asa Branca (from his previous album) a fusion of musical styles that probably have strong roots from his upbringing in Bahia, and including lyrics by Gregorio de Mattos. The entire musical performance begins with a slow crawl, but eventually explodes the first side with an increasingly furious tempo excelerating. 

Which brings us to Lado II, and I admit that I think it is not as strong as the previous side. Still it is fun and classic with Mora na Filosofia being the standout, and opening with the tune It’s a Long Way, which has a gentle groove if it is not slightly overwrought with sentimentality. But on Mora na Filosofia, once again, Caetano with great feeling from his band (shameless uncredited on my reissue copy!) builds the piece to an incredible climax, putting a new spin on the only song that would’ve been previously known to audiences in Brasil. And of the two closing tracks, Neolithic Man is a strange, but not unattractive track almost reminding me of Talking Heads with a clock tick or a metronome-sounding click bouncing from speaker to speaker. I dig the mood of the whole thing actually, and adore the throwaway, Nostalgia, in the same way I love short pieces like Crippled Creek Ferry on After the Goldrush or Her Majesty which closes Abbey Road. Really I put this album and this artist in the company of folks like that, artists I have appreciated for years…by..funky caravan…~


I find this an extremely frustrating album because it brushes with greatness but in the end falls well short for reasons fully avoidable. When you strip out the lyrics, the songs and the melodies are very well-crafted and the musicans execute throughout with a deft and accomplished subtlety. 
The main issue here is the lyrics. Virtually anytime he sings in English, which is about half of the album, I am ready to lift the needle, hit skip, hit eject - whatever it takes -and then make myself a strong drink. The epitome of this is the track “Nine Out of Ten”. You know in the movies when they are torturing prisoners and they blast loud music at them for days on end? Well, instead of playing speed metal, they should just loop in “Nine Out of Ten”. They’ll get their answers right quick. 
The other issue is his over-reliance on refrains, repeating them over and over ad nauseum, again with the aforementioned song being the worst culprit. 
All of which is a shame because he is, of course, a strong lyricist with a great voice and a nuanced delivery if only he would have stuck to his native Portuguese. And because, otherwise, this album is really killing it…by..TheCoolRuler …~


I was very surprised the first time I heard this album. I hadn’t really read anything about it and was just going through Caetano’s discography (kinda in random order) after hearing Domingo and his first album. I think this might have been the third or fourth album I heard by him. Its kind of weird that this ended up being my favorite album by him, taking into consideration that it is so radically different from the album that started my obsession with his solo career: his self titled album which was released in 1968 (also known as Tropicália). That album was completely in Portuguese (except for parts of Soy Loco Por Tí América) and is full of strings and horns and very representative of the Tropicália sound of the time. On the other hand, on this album Caetano pretty much left his past sound behind him completely and opted for a less orchestral presentation of his ideas and sung in English much more than he ever had before. Gone are the strings and horns and the past, which were replaced by Caetano’s acoustic guitar playing and his band (bass, percussion, and an occasional electric guitar). This is definitely his most intimate and raw album, to the point where it at times sounds like it is a live album: a private acoustic concert between Caetano, his band and the listener. From a singing/songwriting point of view, I think this is Caetano’s peak. Songs like “Nine Out Of Ten”, a song about how art makes him feel, features some great interaction between the electric and acoustic guitar (one plays solos while the ladder plays chords). In addition “You Don’t Know Me” and various other songs on the album make a great use of the mix of English and Portuguese in a way Caetano had never done on his previous projects. In terms of albums by singers/songwriters that can be thrown into the Rock/Folk umbrella, I can only think of one, maybe two albums that have impressed me as much as this one. It sucks that the Brazilian government exiled him to London, but at least he made a great use of his time there…by..cosa12…~


Caetano Velloso was an amazingly talented Brazilian musician (compared to composers as Bob Dylan, Bob Marley and Lennon/McCartney), very connected to typical genre’s from his own state (Bahia). In the other hand, in 1968 when his most famous hit (“Alegria, Alegria”) was released, he was alredy extremely influenced by psychedelic rock, especially by The Beatles. “Alegria, Alegria” is his “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” version, with possible mentions to LSD. 
After being arrested, during Brazilian military dictatorship, Veloso decided escaping to England, in 1969. His exile lasted until 1972, when he came back to Brazil. During that time, extremely influenced by Rock 'n’ Roll, he recorded “Transa”, perhaps the greatest Brazilian rock album ever, combinating Rock and Bahian music, English and Portuguese lyrics. 
In 1971, Caetano Veloso changed Brazilian music, forever. Unfortunally, his post-80’s accomplishments created a kind of rejection toward him, by young Brazilians…by…Zitarrosa ….~


Recorded after Veloso’s return to Brasil in 1972, Transa marks a step into an entirely different musical direction. Veloso cuts all connections to the bossa nova sound and instead comes up with an extremely lightweight, summery, unmistakeably Brasilian pop sound that is recognizably influenced by the electric rock he was exposed to during his exile in London. That said, the album is still largely acoustic, but it’s no stranger with the likes of Cat Stevens or Nick Drake. 
The song structures are repetitive to a point of being hypnotic, but no longer as simplistic as on his previous albums, which makes this album a significantly more agreeable listen. Veloso sings in Portuguese and English, but avoids any too direct political references, which remain hidden between the lines. 
There is an unique detached elegance in both the music and Veloso’s delivery of the lyrics, an elegance not found on his previous albums, and it’s exactly this detachment that makes songs like “You Don’t Know Me” or “Triste Bahia” so strong, just as his emotional involvement made songs like “Asa Branca” special. 

It’s this special quality (and the total absence of duds, a rarity on Veloso albums) that makes Transa an album worth owning, even if it may be the least bossa- and the most rock-influenced album. …by…hprill …~


“Transa” is really a phenomenal, albeit somewhat brief, album. This Brazilian classic is easily relatable to a North American audience thanks to its use of English lyrics (about 50% of the vocals are in English and the other half in Portuguese, but the underlying instrumental music and beat transcend all categorizations of language and culture). As Veloso sings in “Nine Out of Ten,” “I’m alive and vivo muito vivo….feel the sound of music banging in my belly….I’m alive!” The tropicalia beats and philosophical lyrics are powerful, intoxicating, and vivifying.
“Transa” is really a phenomenal, albeit somewhat brief, album. This Brazilian classic is easily relatable to a North American audience thanks to its use of English lyrics (about 50% of the vocals are in English and the other half in Portuguese, but the underlying instrumental music and beat transcend all categorizations of language and culture). As Veloso sings in “Nine Out of Ten,” “I’m alive and vivo muito vivo….feel the sound of music banging in my belly….I’m alive!” The tropicalia beats and philosophical lyrics are powerful, intoxicating, and vivifying……By Shanna Nelson…..~


Originally released in England in late 1971, “Transa” (Making Out), was the last of the three albums that Caetano Veloso recorded while in London. The songs are longer and a bit more complex, and five of the seven tracks are written in English. The fabulous “Triste Bahia” features excerpts from the poetry of Gregório de Mattos. Shortly after his return home in 1972, “Barra 69” (a live recording of the last show Caetano and Gilberto Gil did before their exile) came out, followed by the Brazilian release of “Transa” (complete with a 3-D album cover), insuring Caetano’s triumphant comeback. This disc is a milestone in his career, marking the end of his 'English’ period and hinting at the musical experimentation that he would push further on subsequent releases. It’s among the best of his early records and definitely worth checking out….ByMichael Sean….~


I became an addicted listener to Caetano Veloso when I was around 15. Twenty years have passed but my great genius of the Brazilian music still keeps visiting my home day after day and heartbeats assault me nervously whenever a new cd springs up or a show calls for me. To tell the truth, I still can’t help feeling excited with Caetano Veloso, really. 
The 'Transa’ record goes back to 1972 and it’s among those Top10 records of our lives which I would take to that desert island all of us have already been invited to visit. 'Transa’ was recorded during the London phase of Caetano, when he and Gilberto Gil were forced to exile for political and dictatorial reasons. It is a superb record, full of a wide musical richness, where silence achieves a never-heard dimension. Marked by solitude and also by the fact that he was living in a foreign country, 'Transa’ shows a Caetano with traces of musical psychedelism, geniously seasoned with musical flavours from Northeast of Bahia, his homeland. The father of Tropicalism gave birth to an album with a strong identity, strongly winking at the European sound (many of his songs are sung in English), with several references to rock (one of the flagships of Tropicalism), to the Beatles ('woke up this morning / singing an old, old Beatles song’ , in 'It’s a Long Way’) , but still deeply Brazilian. It’s a record made by an unknown singer in the London of that time, a record by someone that lived in a country that he didn’t know and that wouldn’t dare to expect his music being fully understood by those to whom he would open the door of his talent. Solitude and depression that he was facing at that time blurred some musical freshness, categorically evidenced in some of his Brazilian albums. There is no room for doubt when Caetano sings: 'You don’t know me / bet you’ll never get to know me / you don’t know me at all.’, in the opening track. 
'Transa ’ is a conceptual album about homesickness, about absence, about his anguish imprisoned in European walls, about nostalgia and its own marks engraved on music, on his Popular Brazilian music, on rock'n roll which Tropicalism merged with to expand and that definitely changed everything about the sound produced in Brazil. As Caetano sings in 'Nostalgia’, the last track of the record: 'That’s what rock'n roll is all about / I mean, that’s what rock'n roll was all about.’ 
The best justice that we can do to 'Transa’ is, obviously, listening to it from the bottom of our hearts….ByCarlos Lopes…~










Tracklist 
A1 You Don’t Know Me 3:50 
A2 Nine Out Of Ten 4:55 
A3 Triste Bahia 9:32 
B1 It’s A Long Way 6:05 
B2 Mora Na Filosofia 6:16 
B3 Neolithic Man 4:42 
B4 Nostalgia (That’s What Rock'n Roll Is All About) 1:20 


Discografia 


Domingo (1967) – com Gal Costa 
Caetano Veloso (1968) 
Caetano Veloso (1969) 
Barra 69 – Caetano e Gil ao Vivo (1969) 
Caetano Veloso (1971) 
Transa (1972) 
Caetano e Chico Juntos ao Vivo (1972) 
Araçá Azul (1972) 
Temporada de Verão ao Vivo na Bahia (1974) 
Jóia (1975) 
Qualquer Coisa (1975) 
Doces Bárbaros (1976) 
Bicho 1977 (1977) 
Muitos Carnavais (1977) 
Muito – Dentro da Estrela Azulada (1978) 
Maria Bethânia e Caetano Veloso ao Vivo (1978) 
Cinema Transcendental (1979) 
Outras Palavras (1981) 
Brasil (1981) 
Cores, Nomes (1982) 
Uns (1983) 
Velô (1984) 
Totalmente Demais (1986) 
Caetano Veloso (1986) 
Caetano Veloso (1987) 
Caetanear (1989) 
Estrangeiro (1989) 
Sem Lenço, Sem Documento (1990) 
Circuladô (1991) 
Circuladô ao Vivo (1992) 
Tropicália 2 (1993) 
Fina Estampa (1994) 
Fina Estampa ao Vivo (1994) 
Tieta do Agreste (1996) 
Livro (1997) 
Prenda Minha (1999) 
Omaggio a Federico e Giulieta ao Vivo (1999) 
Noites do Norte (2000)
Noites do Norte ao Vivo (2001) 
Eu Não Peço Desculpa (2002) 
Todo Caetano (caixa com 40 CDs) (2002) 
A Foreign Sound (2004) 
Ongotô (2005) 
Cê (2006) 
Cê ao Vivo (2007) 
Zii e Zie (2009) 





watch…..
Caetano Veloso “Caetano Veloso"1968 Brazil Tropicalia Psych Latin,Folk,Pop 


watch
Caetano Veloso "Caetano Veloso"1969 Brazil Latin Bossanova,Psych Rock Tropicalia,Samba,MPB

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

vinyl

vinyl