Sunday, 20 May 2018

Cartola "Cartola"1976 Brazil Latin Samba


Cartola  "Cartola"1976 Brazil Latin Samba, one of the best Brazilian albums ever made
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https://open.spotify.com/album/7x7UYZtatkx5fnqBOhmx1b

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https://open.spotify.com/artist/0RSWHhBUwW7lhCqXqxKxWN


Having released his first album, eponymous in 1974, at age 66, Cartola showed why he had long been considered one of the greatest representatives of samba. The sequence of the work of this great master, arrived in the stores two years later, in 1976, with “Cartola”. Bringing some more great hits from his career, such as “The World Is A Mill” and “The Roses Do not Speak,” the album returns to the 180-gram vinyl shelves by Polysom’s “Clássicos em Vinil” collection. 
The disc, as well as the first one, brings arrangements of Horondino José da Silva (Dino), with production of Juarez Barroso. Of the 12 tracks, 10 are by Cartola, one in partnership with Alcebíades Barcelos. Completing the album, are “I Need to Find Me”, by Candeia, and “Senhora Tentação” by Silas de Oliveira. Among the special guest appearances are Creusa, Cartola’s daughter, who sings two tracks with him….~



The second album by Cartola, released by the label Marcus Pereira, in 1976. It was a critical success, which is not surprising, since the album brings, among other sambas, “The Roses Do not Speak” and “The World Is A Mill ”(Recording accompanying the Guinga guitar), which are masterpieces of popular music, in addition, we have" My “,” Reception Room “,” Happened “,” I Know “,” Steel Strings “and” Ensaboa “….~


This is one of those must-have, must-listen to albums. If you are curious about familiarising yourself with some classic repertoire of Brazilian samba, Cartola is one of the quintessential names to know (and love!). There is also a great documentary about him (Cartola)which is how I got to know of him and his music not too long ago. In any case, this man can do no wrong….by… RoseGonzalez…~


Cartola was one of those unbelievable portraits of sheer genius marred by a life of poverty… exactly the kind of thing that should never happen. 
He was born in 1908 in Rio de Janeiro and throughout his life, Cartola composed roughly 500 sambas. One of them, called O SOL NASCERÁ (The Sun Will Rise) was covered 600 times in 4 or 5 decades. 
This CD gives you some of his best known works like O MUNDO É UM MOINHO (The World Is a Mill), PRECISO ME ENCONTRAR (I Need to Find Myself) and AS ROSAS NÃO FALAM (Roses Do Not Speak). 
His voice is clear (he is more a poet than a singer) and the arrangements are beautiful. Brazilian classic samba at its best! 
It is sad that such talent was overlooked for so many years. Cartola should be rich. His music ranks among the best ever composed in Brazil. Endlessly imitated, endlessly covered. Truly unique….by… Paulo Leite…~


Even twenty years after his death, Cartola remains a milestone in brazilian popular music. When he made this album he was 60 years old already, but his raucous voice fits perfectilly with the beautiful acoustic arrangement.Most of the foreign listeners don’t know how good is samba outside the boundaries of bossa nova.They must start from here. This is the very authentic "samba of roots”….~


Even twenty years after his death, Cartola remains a milestone in brazilian popular music. When he made this album he was 60 years old already, but his raucous voice fits perfectilly with the beautiful acoustic arrangement.Most of the foreign listeners don’t know how good is samba outside the boundaries of bossa nova.They must start from here. This is the very authentic "samba of roots”….~

There is something strange in the story of Agenor de Oliveira, the Cartola, and this is not only due to the famous disappearance of the samba for almost a decade where nobody knows where he walked. This is little compared to trying to understand how the samba scene in Rio left one of the most brilliant interpreters and composers in the history of Brazilian music to enter a production company to record an album at the age of 66 in 1974. samba since 1928 (in the group of young - and troublesome - sambistas Bloco dos Arrengueiros, who later became the beloved by Cartola First Station of Mangueira). 

The fact is that when he entered the studio of Marcus Pereira Records to finally conceive an album of his own, Cartola was a unique phenomenon. He was a gentleman - sparing us of the euphemisms - old, recording his debut after a life suffered, without recognition, where he went from bricklayer and car washer to restaurant owner. The effect was the homonymous album of 74. Artistically mature and self-assured in its twelve sambas. But the apex would come in 1976 with another album of the same name - and do not ask me why the absence of a different title, the result is a “small” big difficulty to refer to the albums, some prefer to call them “Cartola I and II, "others choose to refer to the year - which is now a full work, the peak of samba as a cultural expression of a people, an absurdly melancholic album in the melodies and endowed with a pessimism and cynicism almost sloppy and mocking in the letters that speak of everyday life. 

The album opens with The World Is A Mill, that’s all. One of the most beautiful songs I have ever heard is, in its four simple verses, bitter and sincere. It’s also the album’s most visceral and painful song. Cartola strikes us hard in verses like "Of each love you will inherit only the cynicism” and “… the world is a mill / It will crush your dreams so petty.” Perhaps it is to diminish the album in a whole but scares how this song by itself is able to synthesize so much. 

Next we have three more songs by Cartola, all with an incredible instrumental that escape the obvious and go well beyond the conventions common to samba transforming the songs into samba orchestras, Can not Live without it, for example, has backing vocal, trombone and up matchbox, all perfectly synchronized. Reception Room stands out for the duet with the samba singer Creusa and for the ode to Mangueira. 

The fifth track is one of the two that the composition is not from Cartola, it’s about the genial I Need to Meet, famous Candeia song about the farewell. The following follow the formula, moving sambas, without definite themes, just Carole’s reveries about what life had shown him to this day and his disappointment with much of it. The witty and uncompromising Ensaboa breaks the rhythm with another duet with Creusa and a Cartola this time looking at the little pleasures of life and relationships. In Strings of Steel, which closes the disc, Cartola, in a farewell tone, gives a great thank you to the guitar, to music for all that it has provided; the pleasure of composing and interpreting. 

In his own way, Cartola delivers one of the greatest exponents of Brazilian music, a samba without strings, owing nothing to anyone and without fear of being happy - or sad - worried only about the beat, with his guitar, his cavaquinho and his song, with music as a way of promulgating feelings and sensations….by….Mike Dias….~



The cover of the disk was a window. Cartola signed the work in bold letters, but the cover was divided between the samba artist and his wife, Dona Zica. In her head, a scarf with green and pink motifs, the colors of Mangueira, the samba school that was the window of both to the world. In his head, his already bleached hair was on top of the unflinching dark glasses, the thin mustache, and the peculiar coloring of his nose. Between Zica and Cartola, Zicartola, a vase, a cactus, a plant that stores water to better put up with the desert outside. The window lasted a lifetime, but at the same time it was just inaugurated: it was only two years ago that Cartola had succeeded at the age of 65 to record the first LP, accumulating sambas of a lifetime. Like the other, this second was called Cartola and had been released independently. The last phase of Cartola’s presence in MPB was consolidated. Poor, black and dweller of the hill, he had been over the years bricklayer, typographer, bohemian, watchman, car washerman, ministry continuum. To the sobs in the intervals of the anonymous read, he had come to the window of popularity and supplied the samba with some of the most beautiful songs that Brazil had heard about. In the thirties, it had been recorded by Francisco Alves and Carmen Miranda. In the 1960s, driven by the uneasiness of Nara Leão, he became a jewel in the crown of the post-Bossa Nova politicized youth, the protest song, the pre-Tropicália. The window then opened on the figure of a musical restaurant. the Zicartola. The last and most vigorous of her creative vintages began. Thus would be the 1976 LP, with the old (“Reception Room”, 1941, “I Can not Live Without It”, 1942, the oppressed “Chest Empty”, 1961, “Lady Tentation” by Silas de Oliveira ) and some very new and unforgettable sambas. If a synthesis needed to be done, it would be easy: “The Roses Do not Speak,” nothing more, nothing less. Or rather, there were more: there were “Steel Strings”, “I Need to Find Me” (from Candeia), the lundu of lamentation to the semi-enslavement “Ensaboa” (sung with the adopted daughter Cleusa). Two more LPs would be released before the co-founder of Mangueira and the sad samba died in 1980 at age 72. But that of 1976 might have been the one that best condensed the delights and displeasures of the poet’s imagination. Here was the cleavage of Cartola between two poles, the idyll and the pain. In the first, everything was ode: to the guitar (“Steel Strings”), to samba schools (“Reception Hall”), to hard life on the hill (“Soap”), to flowers (“Roses Do not Speak”) . In the field of pain, lay the consciousness of abandon, “The Roses Do not Speak”, making the link between one pole and another: “I return to the garden / with certainty that I must weep / well I know that you do not want to return / me”. Though elegant and delicate as anyone, Cartola followed the vicious river of popular music and projected the ills from within the breast into the female figure. Rejection themes overflow in “Mine” (in “false” gypsies and “lying” fortune tellers), “I Can not Live Without It,” and “I Can Cry.” It was the cactus, a thorny flower planted in the window-frontier-abyss between men and women. The same material molded the precocious testament “The World is a Mill”: “Pay attention, dear / of each love you will inherit only cynicism / when you notice you are on the edge of the abyss that you dug with your feet”. Even recognized as the genius artist he was, the poet indulged in the cult of defeat, almost exultant skepticism, a cactus aridity. Inside, on the window sill, the water would gush juicy at the first bite, and perhaps that would mean the very loving music that Cartola produced, thirsty, until he died: cactus bark on the outside, drinking water in the sap. Immortal. Cartola is, at the same time, the mirage and the oasis, for those who like thorny bark and for those who like fresh water….by….Alexandre Sanches….~




Musicians
Angenor de Oliveira [Cartola] (vocal e violão); Horondino José da Silva [Dino 7 Cordas] (violão de sete cordas e arranjos); Jaime Tomás Florence [Meira] (violão); Waldiro Frederico Tramontano [Canhoto] (cavaquinho); José Menezes França [Zé Menezes] (viola de dez cordas); Altamiro Carrilho (flauta); Nelson Martins dos Santos [Nelsinho] (trombone); Elton Medeiros (ganzá, tamborim e caixa de fósforos); Gilson de Freitas (surdo); Carlos Althier de Sousa Lemos Escobar [Guinga] (violão); Jorge José da Silva [Jorginho do Pandeiro] (pandeiro); Realcino Lima Filho [Nenê] (cuíca e agogô); Wilson Canegal (reco-reco e agogô); Airton Barbosa (fagote); Abel Ferreira (saxofone tenor); Creusa Francisca dos Santos [Creusa Cartola] (vocal); Joab Lopes Teixeira [Joab] (vozes e coro); além de Mário, Zezé, Marly e Vera nos vocais de apoio.






Tracklist
A1 O Mundo E Um Moinho 3:58
A2 Minha 2:21
A3 Sala De Recepcao 3:29
A4 Não Posso Viver Sem Ela 2:45
A5 Preciso Me Encontrar 3:01
A6 Peito Vazio 2:56
B1 Aconteceu 2:50
B2 As Rosas Não Falam 2:56
B3 Sei Chorar 2:30
B4 Esaboa Mulata 3:26
B5 Senhora Tentacao 3:08
B6 Cordas De Aço 2:19 



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