Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Cuprum “Brahma Višnu Šiva” 2014 Czech Prog Rock


Cuprum “Brahma Višnu Šiva” 2014 Czech Prog Rock
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Progressive-rock due to the multifacetedness of its artisanal. And if some of its varieties (say, the avant-garde) imply the possibility of unceasing development, others (for example, proto-art) do not welcome a significant deviation from the given landmarks. In this regard, the Czechs Cuprum did not cost anything to become hostages of the form. Although after the enchanting debut of “Musica Deposita” (2011) another from them was not required. The guys continued to create in a select, appetizing manner (a forgotten prog-hard of the early seventies), admirers would only thank them. But, apparently, self-copying was not included in the plans of members of the sextet. The second full-size release Cuprum “Brahma Višnu Šiva” on the mood in some way contradicts the first-born. By the way, the schoolboy and the graduate of the university differ in this way. The album was created slowly, for several months (from October 2013 to February 2014). And this solidity caused a moderate glow in the emotional spectrum. 
The release opens with a track “Cizí město v hlavní zemi”, kept in the tradition of Jethro Tull with some admixture of Traffic. It would seem that all the attributes are in place: both the guitar flute riff-bunch, and alternate solos on the same instruments + the unchanged “Hammond” by Stepan Vodenka. However, it sounds without the utmost drive, juiciness, with less density of texture. Even the timbre of frontman Richard Malat has lost its characteristic militancy. Excitement turned serious. As a result, thoughtful “adulthood” has become a concomitant factor of the program. The next attempt to inflame the musicians are taking in the context of the play “Urnový háj”. Yann Drhal, whose guitar ‘wah-wah’ effects at times revitalize the palette, looks more cheerful than others. Union of folk overtones with rock is a win-win piece. But even in such an eventually saturated area, the Czechs manage to snatch their piece of reflection. The etude “Iluzionista” is perfectly constructed. Without unnecessary bravado, the group is implementing a proprietary electroacoustic melos, similar in spirit to the works of Ian Anderson. Composite harmony is in harmony with carefully selected sound means (is it not the main thing for any art opus?). The purely gaming element of the mosaic under the hat “Časostroj”, despite the conditional membership of the proto-progressive, contains a certain degree of contemplation. That within the framework of the indicated direction is perceived by a certain innovation. The title thing is a genuine balm for connoisseurs of the previous work of Cuprum. 'Vltava-rock’ as it is - with flamboyant passages of flute, guitars, ingenious rhythm lines and mellotron background in addition. On the features of the fresco “Chvíle v Canterbury” it is easy to guess from the title; it’s true, typical Caravan’s kind squint next to the rusty Slavic restlessness. “Pracuju na pásu” serves as a legitimate pretext to fool around on the basis of the sparkling hard. The point at the end of the way is posh jam “Labe 02 (frag. VI)”, showing the exceptional strength of the sourdough of the guys from Cuprum. 
I sum up: a worthy continuation of the disc “Musica Deposita”, one of the undoubted progressive successes of 2014. I recommend…..~

Prague band Cuprum publishes a new album after three years. Great expectations and tensions come every single day before “Brahma Vishnu Shiva” finally gets into my hands … 
Cuprum floats here in the waters of their usual, progressive early rock, strongly influenced by the blues-rock sensation and the atmosphere of the late 1960s, when new bands emerged in Czechoslovakia as mushrooms after the rain. It’s hard for the Cuprum musicians to be evil that they have inspired this exceptional era in the history of rock music to inspire, however, it must have a fatal impact on the rating. When a band uses the word “progressive” when describing their own music, one usually expects something new, not heard or at least composing a little more complex than usual. However, the Prague Six is ​​holding up imaginary mantinels and the “Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva” album makes it clear that he is not interested in letting his imagination stand out and provide listeners with any overlap in other genres. It is therefore very difficult to look under the surface of this formation and find out whether it is a natural development or a certain calculus. Although I can not (and do not want) to be sure about this issue, I personally tend to second possibility; I also admit that I can confuse myself. 
Things that could potentially fool the potential listener is also the name of the album. “Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva” reveals some inspiration in Indian culture, but - I suppose - in more than pejorative meaning, which, among other things, has the task of slightly ridicule the classic genre cliché. Like the name, the artwork has the ambition to become slightly controversial, but it only confirms me that Cuprum does not take too seriously and will also give the listeners some insignificant, perhaps humorous, artistic expression. Therefore, where another band is likely to find an overly purposeful concept of the meaning of life and the spiritual path, Cuprum simply makes fun. “Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva” has a very honest and unobtrusive impression, which I certainly do not only acknowledge. Even the lyrics are more than telling in this matter (sample from the text of the title song:Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva / What was not anymore, it is so / And it is only in the dream of sin / The old man who lost the fight with the bald ). 
As I have already said, Cuprum is not a musical discourse, and it takes on a conventional approach (unlike playlists or artwork) which, however, may look different from another point of view. It is hard to guess whether Cuprum is a well-meaning parody of the 1960s and 1970s, or because its music is really serious. This will probably remain hidden for a long time; with every other song, it’s getting harder to crack this mystery. 
Let’s stay in the fact that “Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva” is a reflection of the real band’s potential and the feeling of all six musicians. In this case, there are many avenues. The first one could be a similarity to Flamengo, which I do not believe would be a mere coincidence. A nice fact that could have escaped the inconvenient fan is that Vladimír Mišík was the godfather of this record. Another thing that I personally perceive is far from beneficial is the need to include Hammond’s organ in every song, which is an extremely interesting element, but after a while, the audience begins to eat. From time to time, I can see that the same problem was suffered by the cuprum first musical “Musica Deposita” - both of them reflect the need of the band to have the “retro sound” at all costs. 
The most dramatic piece on the album is to find the very first “Foreign City in the Main Country”, which is interesting to play with words. Instrumentation is absolutely classic, but because it is the first song, it has no chance to get bored. Here, it is worth highlighting the great flute of Richard Malat and a truly memorable melodic line, which after a few listenings seems to be the most striking element of this record; an element that you can not forget as one of the few on “Brahma Viṣṇu Shiva”. Another nice moment that made me memorable is a very nice work with guitar / flute motifs in “Urn Paradise”. With other songs I have no problem, all of them are the princes of the sweet singing melodies, the lyrics are clouded by the ubiquitous recession and the face after listening means a smile. So that’s how. 
The album is slightly controversial, but good recommendation. ….~

Line-up / Musicians 
- Richard Malát / flute, vocals 
- Vladimír Posvic / acoustic guitar, vocals 
- Jan Drchal / electric guitar 
- Stěpán Vodenka / Hammond organ, other keyboards 
- Jaromír Hynek / bass guitar 
- Jan Jezek / drums

Tracklist 
1 Cizí Město v Hlavní Zemi
2 Urnový Háj
3 Illuzionista
4 Časostroj
5 Brahma Višnu Šiva
6 Chvíle v Canterbury
7 Pracuju na Pásu
8 Labe 02 (Frag. VI)

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