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Tuesday, 8 May 2018

Elvin Bishop “Juke Joint Jump” 1975 US Southern Blues Rock,Country Rock


Elvin Bishop “Juke Joint Jump” 1975 US Southern  Blues Rock,Country Rock
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Elvin Bishop official website

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Elvin Bishop’s Macon Takeover continued on his second Capricorn album, which had a slightly less country feel than Let It Flow but continued to be dominated by twin guitar playing (courtesy of Bishop and Johnny “V” Vernazza) and honky tonk piano playing (from Phil Aaberg). The song quality wasn’t quite as consistent this time, but “Sure Feels Good” became Bishop’s second singles chart entry….. by William Ruhlmann….~


In 1974, Elvin Bishop relocated from California to Georgia and began recording for Phil Walden’s Capricorn Records label, then the epicenter of Southern Rock. He assembled a hot new touring band and recorded four albums, heralding a more commercial and soulful sound, but still containing plenty of loose, infectious romps through various blues, country flavored rock, and rhythm & blues stylings that made him so popular on the ballroom and nightclub circuit. Not surprisingly, Bishop’s live performances took a decidedly Southern Rock turn during this time, often with the trademark twin guitar leads (courtesy of Bishop and Johnny Vernazza) and his albums featured guest appearances from label-mates like Charlie Daniels, Dickey Betts and Toy Caldwell. 

During his Capricorn era, Bishop’s group returned to the Bay Area many times. The Record Plant was an old familiar haunt to Bishop, having recorded many previous sessions there, and he and his new band participated in a couple of live broadcasts when they swung through the area. This one captures them at a particularly good time, when the band had a wealth of strong material from the 1974 album Let It Flow, his popular Juke Joint Jump album (released earlier that year), as well as material destined for his next album, Struttin’ My Stuff, which would be released a few weeks after this performance. Add to this several good time, high energy covers, and you have a rejuvenated Elvin Bishop Group delivering exuberant rock ‘n’ roll that rarely lets up. 

They kick things off with the title track to their previous album, “Juke Joint Jump,” with its Stevie Wonder-like keyboard parts, and then things take a barn-dance turn over the course of the next 20 minutes, as they debut new material. “Hey Hey Hey Hey” and “Joy” are paired up, as are “Hollow And Shout” and “Slick Titty Boom,” all soon to be featured on Struttin’ My Stuff. Next up is “Stealin Watermelons,” one of Bishop’s most joyous songs from the 1974 Let It Flow album, followed by a sneak preview of the funkified title track to the forthcoming album. 

At this point, Bishop invites the special guest of the evening up. Label-mate Charlie Daniels straps on a guitar and joins the fray on the next two numbers, covers of “Deep Elem Blues” and “Still In Love With You.” Charlie Daniels handles lead vocals on these songs as well as adding a third guitar to the mix. Next is “Calling All Cows” from the 1974 album, which comes closest to straight rhythm and blues, with strong sax and guitar soloing over a Bo Diddley beat. The rest of the set hits a more soulful New Orleans-flavored groove, with Mickey Thomas belting out a medley of “Let The Good Times Roll,” “A Change Is Gonna Come” and “Bring It On Home To Me.” 

Thomas would be a key element to the success of the forthcoming album, as his vocal on “Fooled Around And Fell In Love” would take the Elvin Bishop Group sailing up the single charts and bring Capricorn Records its first top ten hit since the Allman Brothers’ “Ramblin Man.”…Paste music….~



A veteran guitarist who fused the blues with gospel, R&B, and country traditions, Elvin Bishop was born in Glendale, California, on October 21, 1942. He grew up on a farm in Iowa with no electricity or running water, and eventually moved to Oklahoma with his family when he was ten. Raised in an all-white community, his only exposure to African-American traditions was the radio, which introduced him to the sounds of blues stations in Shreveport, Louisiana. The piercing sound of Jimmy Reed’s harmonica won his attention; Bishop would later liken it to a crossword puzzle that he had to figure out. What was this music? Who made it? What was it all about? Inspired, he began to put the pieces together. 

However, it wasn’t until he won a National Merit Scholarship to the University of Chicago in 1959 that Bishop found the real answers to his questions. He found himself in the middle of the Chicago blues scene and immersed himself in the genre. After two years of college, Bishop dropped out and pursued music full-time, eventually meeting Howlin’ Wolf’s guitarist Smokey Smothers and learning the basics of blues guitar from him. In the early '60s, Bishop teamed up with Paul Butterfield helped form the core of the Butterfield Blues Band. Although he had only played guitar for a few years, he practiced frequently and played with Butterfield in just about every place possible, including campuses, houses, parks, and – in the venue that helped launch the band – Big John’s on Chicago’s North Side. Bishop also helped shape the sound of several Butterfield albums, including The Pigboy Crabshaw, whose title refers to Bishop’s countrified persona. 

In 1968, Bishop left Butterfield’s band following the release of In My Own Dream. He launched a solo career and relocated to the San Francisco area, where he made frequent appearances at the Filmore with artists like Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Jimi Hendrix, and the Allman Brothers Band. Bishop recorded four albums for Epic Records and later signed with Capricorn in 1974. His recording of “Traveling Shoes” (from the album Let It Flow) made a dent on the charts, but the single “Fooled Around and Fell in Love” (from Struttin’ My Stuff) made a bigger splash in 1976 when it peaked at number three on the Billboard charts. Over the next few years, the Elvin Bishop Group dissolved. He released his album Best Of in 1979 and laid low for several years, eventually resurfacing when he signed with the Alligator label in 1988. 

Bishop then released Big Fun in 1988 and Don’t Let the Bossman Get You Down in 1991, both of which were well-received. He also participated in Alligator’s 1992 20th Anniversary cross-country tour; three years later, he toured with veteran bluesman B.B. King and released an album entitled Ace in the Hole. The Skin I’m In followed in 1998, and 2000’s That’s My Partner saw him teaming up with Smokey Smothers, the same musician who had originally taught him guitar. After a five-year hiatus, Bishop released Gettin’ My Groove Back in 2005 via Blind Pig Records; he then jumped to the Delta Groove Music label for 2008’s The Blues Rolls On, which featured guest spots by B.B. King, Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, and others. Red Dog Speaks (the title refers to his beloved red 1959 ES- 345 Gibson guitar), arrived in 2010, with the joyous and gritty Can’t Even Do Wrong Right appearing in 2014. ~ Michael Erlewine & Steve Leggett…..~




Credits 
Acoustic Guitar – Elvin Bishop, Johnny “V” Vernazza* 
Backing Vocals – Don Baldwin*, Johnny “V” Vernazza* 
Bass – Michael “Fly” Brooks* 
Cowbell – Don Baldwin* 
Drums – Don Baldwin* 
Electric Guitar – Elvin Bishop, Johnny “V” Vernazza* 
Electric Piano – Philip Aaberg 
Guest, Acoustic Guitar – Johnny Sandlin, Stephen Stills (tracks: A3) 
Guest, Backing Vocals – Jo Baker (tracks: B2), June Pointer (tracks: B3), Micky Thomas*, Ross Hayashida 
Guest, Bass – Ross Mason (2) (tracks: B1) 
Guest, Electric Guitar – Johnny Sandlin 
Guest, Harmonica – Rick Kellogg (tracks: A3, B1) 
Guest, Percussion – Johnny Sandlin 
Lead Vocals – Elvin Bishop 
Organ – Philip Aaberg 
Piano [Acoustic Piano] – Philip Aaberg 
Slide Guitar – Elvin Bishop, Johnny “V” Vernazza* 
Synthesizer – Philip Aaberg 
Synthesizer [Bass WIth Moog Synthesizer] – Philip Aaberg (tracks: A2, A4) 
Timbales – Don Baldwin*







Tracklist 
A1 Juke Joint Jump 5:32 
A2 Calling All Cows 4:30 
A3 Rollin’ Home 4:57 
A4 Wide River 5:54 
B1 Sure Feels Good 2:48 
B2 Arkansas Line 3:22 
B3 Hold On 3:42 
B4 Crawlin’ Kingsnake 3:51 
B5 Do Nobody Wrong 4:50 

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