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Tuesday, 29 May 2018

Gordi “Čovek"1978 Yugoslavia Prog Rock


Gordi “Čovek"1978 Yugoslavia Prog Rock
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GORDI was formed in November 1977 by Zlatimir Zlatko Manojlović. The band’s first lineup consisted of Zlatko Manojlović (guitar, vocals), Zlatko’s brother Goran Manojlović (keyboards), Stevan Milutinović Steva (drums) and Dragan Janković (bass guitar). After Zdenko Pomper replaced Janković on bass guitar, the band released its debut album "Čovek” in 1978. Album featured song “Misli”, which was previously released on the B-side of the single “Žeđ”, the last single released by Manojlović’s previous band Dah. The album was progressive rock-influenced and in an interwiev for Rock Express Zlatko Manojlović described the band’s sound as “psychedelic”. Soon after the album release, Pomper was replaced by Slobodan Svrdlan, and Gordi released their second studio album “Gordi 2”. The album was released in 1979. While the band’s first album was mainly progressive rock-oriented, “Gordi 2” featured more hard rock elements. In 1980 Zlatko Manojlović released his first solo album “Zlatko i njegove gitare” and in 1981 the band released their third studio album “Gordi 3”. Although progressive/hard rock-oriented, “Gordi 3” also featured pop music elements. The same year, Gordi performed as the opening band on Ian Gillan Band concert in Beograd. In 1981, Gordi became a power trio, after Stevan Milutinović was replaced by Čedomir Petrović “Čeda”, and Goran Manojlović left the band. The band signed for Jugoton and released the album “Pakleni trio” which marked Gordi’s shift toward’s heavy metal and is considered one of the milestones on the former Yugoslav hard rock and heavy metal scene. In 1982, the band released “Kraljica smrti” album, however, they failed to sustain their popularity and disbanded two years after the album release. …~


We’ve covered bands from many countries over the course of Sunday Old School’s history. From Mezarkabul in Turkey to Aria in Russia and Holy Dragons from Kazakhstan across to Asian bands like Crash from South Korea and Sigh, Loudness and Church Of Misery from Japan. However, one thing we haven’t done as of yet, is look at a group who’s entire history took place in a country that no longer exists. Of course the land is still there, but the nation formerly known as Yugoslavia has since become several countries and the former capital city of Belgrade is now the capital of Serbia. Despite being gripped in the rule of Marshal Tito, a dictator whose legacy remains disputed, rock and metal music was able to find it’s way into the country and was pioneered when it came into the hands of the proud ones, or rather, Gordi. 

Gordi, which as the previous paragraph alluded to, is Serbian for “the proud ones,” was formed in 1977 in Belgrade by guitarist, Zlatko Manojlovic, along with his brother Goran, drummer Stevan Milutinovic Steva and bassist Dragan Jankovic, who was soon replaced by Zdenko Pomper. It was only after this change that the group were able to record and release their first album, “Covek,” through the Ljubljana based major label, ZKP RTLJ. It was very much a progressive rock affair, with Zlatko Manojlovic later describing it as “psychedelic.” 

Following their debut, Gordi moved to the state owned label PGB-RTB, (as you can see, Yugoslavia was big on catchy names,) and once again replaced their bass player, this time bringing in Slobodan Svrdlan. Though still essentially a prog album, their sophomore full length, “Gordi 2,” marked the first signs of their future sound, with more hard rock and early heavy metal traits seeping into the music, which remained on their third album, appropriately enough entitled, “Gordi 3,” though this was considered to be a more “poppy” album than the previous two releases. 

After opening for the Ian Gillan Band at the Pionr Hall in Belgrade, Gordi began to incorporate a much harder sound into their music, and with it, a more uniform heavy metal look, such as leather jackets et al. By now, they had become a power trio after Zlatko’s brother, Goran Manojlovic left the group and Stevan Milutinovic was replaced by Cedomir Petrovic “Ceda.” They again changed labels, this time teaming up with the Zagreb based company, Jugoton, and released their fourth album, “Pakleni Trio,” which was well received by rock critics at home and those who could get their hands on it abroad. 

It appeared that with “Pakleni Trio,” the band had found their sound and kept it for their next full length record, “Kraljica Smrti,” (“Queen of Death,”) which once again was met with generally favourable reviews. Despite the plaudits the band were beginning to receive and the tag of being one of Yugoslavia’s most popular heavy metal bands, Gordi decided to call it a day in 1984, with many members going on to perform with other heavy metal groups both in Yugoslavia and abroad, while Zlatko Manojlovic went on to have a respected solo career….~






Zlatko Manojlović (guitar, vocals) 
Goran Manojlović (keyboards) 
Stevan Milutinović Steva (drums) 
Zdenko Pomper (bass)


Tracklist 
A1 Čovek
A2 Budi Gord I Jak
A3 Imam Snage
A4 Borba
A5 Sutra Može Biti Kiše
B1 Misli
B2 Mr. Alkohol
B3 Život
B4 Odlazim U Noć
B5 Jugoslavijo 

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