body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

Sunday, 27 May 2018

Jean-Bernard Raiteux “Les Demons” 1973 France Soundrack,Psych,Avant Garde,Folk,Pop


Jean-Bernard Raiteux “Les Demons” 1973 France Soundrack,Psych,Avant Garde,Folk,Pop
full vk
https://vk.com/wall312142499_10753

full mixcloud

https://www.mixcloud.com/Sequencesonore/s%C3%A9quence-sonore-e19-les-d%C3%A9mons-jean-bernard-raiteux-1973/

full youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOhZSCTNCu0


In 1973, legendary Spanish independent filmmaker Jess Franco made an X-rated version of The Devils meets The Witchfinder General, spawning this as-yet-unreleased masterpiece of funked up, wah-driven pornadelica. Ominous piano chords and funereal organs (The Inquisition) give way to wig-out jazz funk of the title and then it’s into the fluid groove of Kathleen Writhing. Taking in psychedelia, folk and pop on the way, Les Demons is the motherlode of vintage Euro-porn soundtracks. ….~


If that creepy cover image alone isn’t more than enough to make you want this record, the magical music within will certainly tip the balance! Jean-Bernard Raiteux may be best known for his French funk sounds in the Harlem Pop Trotters, but he’s even more weird and wonderful here – turning in a wickedly groovy score for Jess Franco’s film Les Demons (aka The Devils), with trippy sounds that are every bat as great as the music used in Franco’s classic Vampyros Lesbos! The music has currents of jazz, funk, and psych – often all operating at once, with cool keyboards, fuzzy guitar, and lots of these fluttering flute lines that almost sound like Harold McNair or Roland Kirk on acid – blowing their minds, as they blow their minds out through their reed instruments too….Dusty Groove…~


The unreleased Euro pysch score to the French/Portuguese X-rated version of The Devils meets The Witchfinder General! Synchronised by Spanish anti-establishmentarian, sexual liberator, die-hard independent filmmaker and unrepentant voyeur Jess Franco (Vampyros Lesbos/De Sade). Composed entirely by French composer Jean-Bernard Raiteux aka Jean-Michel Lorgere (Sinner/Harlem Pop Trotters) and presented here in full soundtrack form for the first time. 

Proudly claiming the dubious accolade of the Spanish sexploitation version of The Devils as the distributor’s most bankable asset, this previously banned 1973 European witch flick would rip the art house facade from Ken Russell’s well polished box office smash and push the envelope way beyond the closet titillation of the gentrified new wave controversy seekers. 

Delivered on a comparable shoestring budget as the 55th feature in Jess Franco’s filmography of approximately 203 completed movies, The Demons (Les Démons), directed under the Anglicised pseudonym Clifford Brown, took many of the Franco’s sexually stylistic watermarks (epitomised in his Vampyros Lesbos trilogy) adding witchcraft, possession and nunsploitation against a rural Mediterranean backdrop before disappearing into the woods. 

Whilst clearly taking inspirational plot cues from Michael Reeve’s The Witchfinder General (UK 1968) and drawing comparisons with scenes from Eiichi Yamamoto’s Belladonna Of Sadness (Japan 1973) this B-Movie reduction of Franco’s wide palette of colourful ingredients has in recent years provided enthusiasts/champions/defenders of the workaholic horrotica bastion with a rare and treasured addition. 

Future-proofed by an essential component, omnipresent in Franco’s films, it is the mysterious commercially unobtainable soundtrack music that cements the unwaning interest in his risqué brand of unconventional shock/schlock sinema (not hindered my the enigmatic title card misinformation that often surrounds the original composers) and the music herein that has given Franco’s harshest critics a second chance/reason to reevaluate this man’s unapologetic art. 

Following on from Finders Keepers previous expanded release of Bruno Nicolai’s score for Franco’s 1970 adaptation of De Sade (FKR069) this record stands as another tribute to Franco’s life which he lived through the mechanisms of a camera with relentless zeal and a passion to challenge every aspect of movie making along the way. 

UNDERground, OVERambitious, RIGHT on, LEFTfield, BELOW the radar but ABOVE criticism. INdulgent and OUTrageous, but never middle of the road, Jess Franco was many things but he wasn’t pretentious and never delivered art for art’s sake and I feel honoured to have spent time with him. Franco was in fact a realist, he kept both feet firmly on the ground and a keen eye behind the right side of the lens and if Jess did have any demons his films were his exorcisms, the critics were the bloody judges and his legacy (through the medium of X-rated cinema of variable quality) is immortal……~


Following on from Finders Keepers previous expanded release of Bruno Nicolai’s score for Franco’s 1970 adaptation of ‘De Sade’, this record stands as another tribute to Franco’s life which he lived through the mechanisms of a camera with relentless zeal and a passion to challenge every aspect of movie making along the way. 
“Proudly claiming the dubious accolade of the Spanish sexploitation version of The Devils as the distributor’s most bankable asset, this previously banned 1973 European witch flick would rip the art house facade from Ken Russell’s well polished box office smash and push the envelope way beyond the closet titillation of the gentrified new wave controversy seekers. Delivered on a comparable shoestring budget as the 55th feature in Jess Franco’s filmography of approximately 203 completed movies, The Demons (Les Démons), directed under the Anglicised pseudonym Clifford Brown, took many of the Franco’s sexually stylistic watermarks (epitomised in his Vampyros Lesbos trilogy) adding witchcraft, possession and nunsploitation against a rural Mediterranean backdrop before disappearing into the woods. 
Whilst clearly taking inspirational plot cues from Michael Reeve’s The Witchfinder General (UK 1968) and drawing comparisons with scenes from Eiichi Yamamoto’s Belladonna Of Sadness (Japan 1973) this B-Movie reduction of Franco’s wide palette of colourful ingredients has in recent years provided enthusiasts/champions/defenders of the workaholic horrotica bastion with a rare and treasured addition. Future-proofed by an essential component, omnipresent in Franco’s films, it is the mysterious commercially unobtainable soundtrack music that cements the unwaning interest in his risqué brand of unconventional shock/schlock sinema (not hindered my the enigmatic title card misinformation that often surrounds the original composers) and the music herein that has given Franco’s harshest critics a second chance/reason to reevaluate this man’s unapologetic art.”



Tracklist 
A1 The Inquisition
A2 Les Démons
A3 Kathleen Writhing “Kathleen”
A4 The Weakness Of Rosalinda “Melodious Modulation”
A5 The Visit / Margaret’s Hallucination
A6 Three Serpents To Karen’s Dwelling
B1 The Second Inquisition
B2 A Witch’s Daughter?
B3 The Seduction Of Winter “The Last Frolic”
B4 Kathleen & The Horses
B5 The Stake
B6 Kathleen & The Serpents 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

vinyl

vinyl