Saturday, 26 May 2018

Modulo 1000 “Nao Fale Com Paredes” 1972 Heavy Psych Brazilian Monster + Love Machine "The Cancer Stick / Waitin’ For Tomorrow" 1972 rare single 7" by Modulo 1000 with name “Love Machine”


Modulo 1000 “Nao Fale Com Paredes” 1972 mega rare Heavy Psych Brazilian Monster +  Love Machine  "The Cancer Stick / Waitin’ For Tomorrow" 1972 rare single 7" by  Modulo 1000 with name “Love Machine”
full youtube
Love Machine  "The Cancer Stick / Waitin’ For Tomorrow" 1972 single 7" Brazil Psych Rock 
full single on dailymotion
https://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/x3c05z

watch interview  with Daniel Romani & Luiz Simas   by psychedelic baby

http://www.psychedelicbabymag.com/2011/07/modulo-1000-interview-with-daniel.html




This is heavy, raw and experimental Psychedelic music from 1971. I don’t think the record label really knew what to do with these drugged out hippies and their protest songs back in the day, so they really weren’t promoted at all. This album has become one of those rare and obscure collector items as a result. They recently released 500 copies of this recording on cd with 8 bonus tracks. I got mine from “Synphonic”. Thankyou Greg ! 
“Turpe Est Sine Crine Caput” is a psychedelic tune with pulsating organ and processed vocals. Fuzz on this one as well (hi Tom). I like the aggressive guitar 2 ½ minutes in. “Nao Fale Com Paredes” sounds even better with the vocals shouting out the lyrics as the raw guitar rips it up. Lots of organ and drums, the latter is especially prominant 2 ½ minutes in. “Espelho” is very psychedelic like early FLOYD. Floating organ and the vocals really fit this 60’s styled music. “Le Ed Ecalg” is uptempo as organ and guitar tear it up while drums are pounded. Some heaviness late. “Olho Por Olho, Dente Por Dente” is darker with some great sounding organ, guitar and drums. Vocals join in with attitude.They do get theatrical at times. Great guitar after 3 minutes. \
“Metro Mental” sounds really good with the intricate guitar and drums. It becomes psychedelic before it kicks in after 2 ½ minutes. It gets darker after 3 minutes. Vocals before 4 minutes. Love the instrumental section before 5 ½ minutes. “Teclados” is a short instrumental of piano and organ. I like it. “Salve-Se Quem Puder” opens with a SABBATH vibe, very dark and doom-like.The guitar, organ and vocals would definitely make BLACK SABBATH fans proud. “Animalia” is a short but cool track with different sounds coming and going. Guitar leads the way. 
The next 4 bonus tracks don’t even sound like the same band. They’re a lot lighter and more commercial sounding. Not a big fan of these. Then we get “Curtissima” which is a big improvement. I like the bass and overall sound. This song and the next were bonus tracks on an earlier re-issue of this album. Both are quite good. The last two bonus tracks were put out by the same band in 1972 but they had changed their name by then to the LOVE MACHINE, yikes ! The lyrics are in English for both songs as well.The first song “Cancer Sticks” is an anti-smoking tune that is hilarious with this guy coughing throughout.The second “Waiting For Tomorrow” is one of the best tunes on here. Great guitar and drumming, it’s a heavier track that would have fit on the original album quite well. Check out the guitar 2 minutes in ! 
Recommended to fans of heavy Psychedelic music….by Mellotron Storm ….~


Coming from the Brazilian underground, we have here a spectacular lost gem of space rock. Modulo 1000 only cut a single record, not even ever reuniting, but it is a killer. The record is somewhere between a hard take on space and psycadelia, and an oscillated sound that makes this a forgotten companion piece to “The United States of America” and the works of The Screamers. The latter part of the style was a wonderful surprise on first listen, and shows just how surprisingly far early experimentation with electronica managed to reach. The combination is excellent, and played to maximum skill and effect. This album is a trip through a cyberpunk “Alice In Wonderland”, with fantastic guitars, drums, vocals, synths, piano, and oscillators plumbing a path through the half-electro dreamscape. If “The United States of America” and “Ash Ra Tempel” either or both excite you, then this is a perfect next listen….by LearsFool …..~







Digitally remastered and expanded edition of this 1970 classic. Brazil’s late ‘60s Tropicalia movement - where electric instruments and current pop was merged with local music - has been recognized as one of the most vital, exciting music scenes in the world. Modulo 1000 took it even further on Não Fale Com Paredes (Don’t Talk to Walls). RPM International’s reissue of Não Fale Com Paredes shows that Tropicalia was part of the story - Brazil was the home to even freakier music. Although influenced by Led Zeppelin and Steppenwolf, Modulo 1000 sounded like no one else. Raw and exotic, Modulo 1000 pitched heavy guitars against songs influenced by Psychedelia. On a line between progressive and hard rock, Modulo 1000 still sounded Brazilian. RPM International’s special, band-approved issue of their only album is supplemented by all the tracks Modulo 1000 recorded for singles and rare compilation albums….~


Modulo 1000 is one of Brasil´s famous progressive rock bands of the early 1970´s, their only album frm1971 became legendary in the collectors scene, as one of the weirdest South American psych albums. The music is a synergy of British and American heavyrock (Black Sabbath, Hendrix, Led Zeppelin) and obscure Exotica, unique and catchy in its own way. As Luiz Simas (organ) remembers: “The music of Modulo 1000 had its own appeal to an audience that wanted a heavy, raw, experimental, psychedelic sound. 
Our kind of music did not make it to the radio stations. It was too wild. The distribution of the record was done in a very limited way. The record label directors, which probably didn’t understand or even didn’t like our music, did zero promotion for the LP…..~


Modulo 1000 is one of Brasil´s most famous progressive rock bands of the early 1970s. Their only album from 1971 became legendary in the collectors scene as one of the weirdest South American psych albums. The music is a synergy of British and American heavy rock (Black Sabbath, Hendrix, Led Zeppelin) and obscure Exotica. As Luiz Simas (organ) remembers: "The music of Modulo 1000 had its own appeal to an audience that wanted a heavy, raw, experimental, psychedelic sound. Our kind of music did not make it to the radio stations. It was too wild. The distribution of the record was done in a very limited way. The record label directors, which probably didn’t understand or even didn’t like our music, did zero promotion for the LP.” This LP is highly recommended as one of the most terrific psychedelic, artistic statements of the 70s progressive hippie-era!…..~ 


Brazil's late '60s Tropicalia movement - where electric instruments and current pop was merged with local music - has been recognized as one of the most vital, exciting music scenes in the world. Modulo 1000 took it even further on Nao Fale Com Paredes (Don't Talk To Walls). RPM International's reissue of Nao Fale Com Paredes shows that Tropicalia was part of the story - Brazil was the home to even freakier music. Although influenced by Led Zeppelin and Steppenwolf, Modulo 1000 sounded like no one else. Raw and exotic, Modulo 1000 pitched heavy guitars against songs influenced by Psychedelia. On a line between progressive and hard rock, Modulo 1000 still sounded Brazilian. RPM International's special, band-approved issue of their only album is supplemented by all the tracks Modulo 1000 recorded for singles and rare compilation albums.....~ 


This is an album that deserves attention. When rock in the late 60's in Brazil was more or less what has been shown here, a group would be coming up with a new proposal. It was the first time in Brazil that we heard a kind of rock that went beyond the limits of psychedelic, a new sound with pretensions far greater than a simple fad. "Do not talk to walls" was revolutionary even on the totally conceptual cover. The 1000 module appeared through this lp, which I consider a masterpiece, an early landmark of Brazilian progressive rock. As always, it was another jewel that was not well appreciated, forgotten and rarely remembered. They tell us that in the 90's, a collector from Rio de Janeiro bought the rights to Módulo 1000 with Top Tape and turned the LP into a CD with a limited number of copies (in Brazil). The CD was released by Zaher Zein / Eternal Light Project. And it seems to me that it also spread to the international market, being relaunched in Europe.....~ 


Spawning from Brazilian psychedelia and Anglo-American hard-rock, MÓDULO 1000 represented a fusion of both sonorities, coming up with something new in the Brazilian musical scene. 
The Rio de Janeiro group, featuring Luiz Paulo Simas (keyboards and vocals, later with VIMANA and O TERÇO), Eduardo Leal (bass guitar), Daniel Cardona Romani (guitar and vocals) and Candinho (drums, later with VIMANA), would put out only one album, 1971's "Não Fale Com Paredes", a clear display of their musical influences, ranging from BLACK SABBATH and QUATERMASS to OS MUTANTES through early PINK FLOYD. The nine pieces that made the album display an array of guitar-heavy and keyboard-drenched music, featuring multiple vocals singing protest lyrics - probably one of the reasons why the album was ill-received by the media. The album has achieved a collectable value today, especially in Brazil and Europe, where it reached cult status. A CD re-edition of "Não Fale Com Paredes" saw the light of day in 1998. 
An early example of Brazilian progressive rock, MÓDULO 1000 are an essential listen to anyone wishing to gather more knowledge about this musical scene. 
João Cotrim (Kotro) - January 2009.....~ 


So many dark proto-metal riffs, it's in the same league as Black Sabbath. The fuzz tone of the guitarist alone is enough to make this enjoyable, and he even plays some wonderful wah-heavy, acid rock styled lead guitar overdubbed on top of those tremendous doom riffs. The vocals are actually not that bad, with the exceptions of the first track and "Espelho", which both have some inexplicably grotesque high pitched distortion, but don't let that prevent you from listening to the first track, because its riff is easily enough to redeem it. 

Both the guitarist and keyboardist are apparently aware of their "virtuoso" status within the band, since they each dedicate an entire track to show off their playing without any of the other band members. The keyboardist gets "Teclados", where he plays a piano and an organ (possibly at the same time, I guess this is interesting for keyboard fans). But the guitarist's solo work, Animália, is far more interesting, consisting of four entire guitars (obviously overdubbed atop each other)! One acoustic guitar to play the rhythm in the background, one heavy-fuzzed riff-playing guitar in the left speaker, one cool acid noise guitar in the right speaker, and one backwords acid solo in the middle. I don't really care for the backwards gimmick, but overall it's a pretty cool, mellow track, especially if you like fuzz. Thankfully, the display of virtuosity stops there, seeing as how so many other bands made the dreadful mistake of giving the drummer his own solo. 
If you decide to get this album, be sure to find the B-sides "Ferrugem e Fuligem" and "Waiting for Tomorrow", sometimes available as bonus tracks. But beware of the "Complete Works" album; the album tracks are stretched out to a degree I don't think was originally intended by the band, and I think the only purpose it serves is to make the album seem longer.....by....Andrupchik ....~ 



I’ve never been the biggest fan of this album, but you certainly won’t hear many recordings like it out there. Right off the bat we’re treated to some absolute freakiness, with creepy organ mindfuckery and vocals being transmitted from a far off psychedelic galaxy. Then the heavy guitar comes in to lay waste to your remaining brain cells. I’ve heard a fair number of psychedelic albums in my time, but I’ve never heard the guitar sound like this before. When I say this one is other-worldly, I mean it’s OTHERFUCKINGWORLDLY. The second song takes some definite inspiration from Sabbath, but doesn’t let up with the trippy organ and vocals. Think the Sabs, but way more cosmic and way more psychedelic. I suppose Planet Caravan is like that, but the vibrations here are much more intense. The astral journey mellows a bit during song número três, but we’re still nowhere near reality yet. Far from it in fact. I don’t even know WTF is going on during the next track, Lem-ed-êcalg, but it’s quite the interesting ride, with lots of buzzing colours and chaos. Ôlho Por Olho, Dente Por Dente, which apparently translates to Eye For Eye, Tooth For Tooth, is next and is just as bizarre as everything we’ve heard so far. This song is genuinely fucked and the organ in it is very scary. Don’t ingest hallucinogenics prior to listening to this album. Your third eye might burst out of your skull during this particular track (if it hasn’t already). The band explores more mind-bending sounds with the sixth track and bust out the heavy Sabbath destruction once more midway through. Metrô Mental is certainly an appropriate title for it, as it is just fookin’ mental. I can’t stress enough how truly out there this album is. And every song, while always keeping with the sci-fi-chedelic vibe (hey, a new word!), is unique in its own way. Track seven gives you a bit of a breather and is a sort of interlude thing which leads into another very heavy number. Salve-Se Quem Puder, the second last song of the LP, is another one that should appeal to the Sabbath fans in the audience. Don’t get too caught up in all these Black Sabbath comparisons though. This band is totally unique and gives us their own fucked up trip to experience. The Birmingham doomsters are just the best reference point for any heavy music from this time period. Finally, just as quickly as it began, the ride ends with a short track entitled Animália, which contains more wild guitar effects and weird drumming. If you happen to be listening to the reissued CD with bonus tracks, you’ll be treated to an extremely abrupt shift in gears though. Gloriosa is so obviously the band’s attempt at making “suit-friendly” music for commercial appeal. The majority of the other bonus cuts follow this trend and are absolutely nothing like what was just experienced on the album. I don’t mind most of these songs, and they have a very nice Brazilian flavour, but they’re definitely not what I’m here for. The lone exception would be the track Waiting For Tomorrow, which the band recorded under the Love Machine alias. Although not quite as mental as the material from Não Fale Com Paredes, this is a nice and heavy little surprise that showed that the band should have done another album or seven. Beware the A side of the Love Machine single though. The Cancer Stick, as it’s called, is silly as hell and either annoys the piss out of me on some days, or makes me smile and entertains me somewhat on other days. But at least they were conveying a positive, anti-cigarette message, which wasn’t that common in those days I don’t think.....by.....Groovy......~ 


Modulo 1000's only album is a mega rarity as the original pressing. The band plays heavy psych with clear progressive rock elements here and there. The songs have Portuguese lyrics and while the singer isn't that good the band sounds effective. 
This album is not a personal favourite of mine but it's a nice listen. It gets 3,5 stars from me which means it's a solid and good record but nothing outstanding. If you're into the early 70's guitar driven hard rock you should check this one out. Especially if you like hard rock mixed with psychedelia and prog rock....by ...CooperBolan ....~


The turn of the 60s to the 70s was marked by profound musical transformations. The consecration of psychedelism, sedimenting the bases of progressive rock and hard rock, the mixture of styles and influences, technological evolution associated with experimentalism, all these factors have been successively recalled during the last decades and pointed out as the main responsible for a period almost unanimously regarded as the most fertile pop music in the world: the 1970s. But in Brazil? Did everything happen the same way, and at the same pace? How was the trajectory of pioneering progressive rock bands in the national territory, such as O Terço, A Bubha or Módulo 1000? Trying to reassemble a little of this history, the Musical Box talked with some old members of the Module 1000, one of the few Brazilian bands of the style to achieve some special projection
The group's trajectory began in the mid-60's, not unlike that of so many others: boys from the south of Rio, college friends, with a lot of disposition and practically no money in their pockets. After several unsuccessful experiences, Daniel C. Romani (guitar) and Eduardo Leal (bass) set up the Code 20 set, already going through, at the end of 1968, the traditional dance circuit of the clubs of Rio de Janeiro. Friends of childhood, for years they played together, with various formations and names: The Who, Brazilian Monkes (sic), The Scorpions, etc. "Daniel said he was putting together a set with Armando (drums) and that he was in need of a base guitarist," says Eduardo. Self-taught, living the beatles of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, they would save up the last penny to get some instruments. They collected scrap iron, made guitars (or something vaguely similar, which ended up gaining that name, lacking another better one ...) to sell, and played for free, because, as Armando defended it, "playing was the great thing" . The results were coming in slowly, as Daniel says: "It was Armando on drums, I playing solo, German on base guitar, and Eduardo already playing bass. Although we were not much, we were not weak, we got to play in the best places around here in terms of dancing. The great thing about this time was you playing in Fluminense, Botafogo, in great domingueiras where they also played groups like The Wilds, for example, that they threw themselves on the floor, jumped on the tables, the trousers saint-tropez fell, it was madness .. . ". At that time of events, as the band progressed in small steps, a new member appeared on the scene, who would give a great professional turn in the young set, opening several doors and making possible everything that happened later.
Paulo Cezar Willcox was a jazz musician par excellence, and a great vibraphone player, but he seemed to have arrived a bit late to the Brazilian music scene. After the boom of instrumental bossa-nova from the mid-60s, this sound was already getting too saturated, and he decided to try his luck in the growing and promising rock'n'roll market. He joined Code 20 shortly before a TV Globo amateur band competition, which offered as a prize four performances in Paulo Silvino's program, as well as a whole new set of instruments and musical instruments, something that the band urgently needed. Integrated into the ensemble, "Zé Bola", as it was called, soon put itself in a prominent position, introducing great doses of professionalism and planning the performance of the group in the grand finale. To the horror of most guys (who did not wear a jacket or marriage), they would feature Herman's Hermits' "There's a Kind of Rush", followed by "Tequila," that classic Champs title sung in unison at the end of each sentence. In the final performance on Chacrinha's program, Willcox played the vibraphone fiercely, then left the stage and came back pushing two huge orchestral eardrums, attacking them in a furious duel with the drums. This caused great fury in the public and the jurors, and made the group finally take the first prize out of literally thousands of competing young bands.
Soon after Willcox's entry, drummer Candinho (Candido Souza Farias), already with some experience and also versed in the language of jazz, had also joined the band. "In fact, Willcox and Candinho at the time almost went together," recalls Daniel. "The Willcox came to me and said that with Armando it did not work, there was no way. I argued that I set up everything with him from the beginning, but he insisted on bringing the Candinho. Armando was very annoyed, but the Willcox had knowledge, was going to open some doors for us. In fact they did not come in just because we were cool ... Deep down they saw the band more as an opportunity to make a change. We were technically and theoretically weaker musicians in front of their level, so we had to grate a lot to be able to accompany them. " And that was the time when everyone began to leave amateurism behind and to effectively mature as musicians. 

At the beginning of 1969, the set got a contract in the nightclub Catraka of São Paulo. After Bossa Nova (more specifically the Agora-4 group), keyboardist Luiz Paulo Simas joined the band on that occasion: "The group needed an organist to fulfill a long contract at a nightclub in São Paulo. They hired me because I had an Eletrocord organ, and I left the second year of architecture college in Fundão (N.R .: UFRJ) to go with them to São Paulo. It was a good salary, and a good excuse to drop out of college. " Thus, with Willcox on the vibraphone, Daniel on the guitar, Luiz Paulo Simas on the organ, Eduardo on bass and Candinho on drums, the first formation of the 1000 Module was born, a name inspired by the American and Soviet lunar modules, much in vogue at that time of space race .
In the season at Catraka, the 1000 Module played the repertoire of classics of the era, such as Beatles, Stones, Hair and Hendrix. Mirna, Daniel's sister, participated for a while, adding a female voice, more commercial and accessible, to Willcox's taste. However, his goals and the rest of the group were beginning to drift apart. "Catraka was a very large house, and we lived upstairs; only slept, rehearsed and played all day. It was there, in these essays, that we began our plot, "recalls Daniel. "Willcox realized that in those extra hours off work, the four of us would do a parallel jam session to write down some things, record others. He noted that we were always wanting to take a turn for that side, but there was no fight, we never argued. He even realized that that sound no longer housed his vibraphone or his annoyance ... We wanted to get out of that show-dance scheme, wanted to make a progressive rock band, it never left our heads. Before bidding farewell to the group, Willcox still lent a hand at Record's V Festival of MPB in November 1969. To take revenge on the hated tequila-imposed suits in the previous year, a typical "tropicalist" costume - fully carved - was hand-picked for Willcox's discomfort.
"Módulo 1000 was that band that said, 'I do not want to touch anyone else,'" says Daniel. The four musicians began 1970s willing to everything. Not that there were no exceptions - in a certain context, something like "Communication Breakdown" (for Led Zeppelin) or "Sweet Leaf" (of Black Sabbath), for example - but the goal now was to win on its own terms, definitely. Staying longer in São Paulo, where the circuit of shows offered more opportunities, the spaces were being patiently conquered. The four-hour dance shows were reduced to forty minutes. "We got a contract to play in Praia Grande, at the Siri Club. We played to dance at the club every night - seven times a week! - to a hall always crowded with young people who worshiped us. When the season came, we would only give them to the club, "recalled Eduardo and Luiz Paulo, about the club where they would still perform for another two years. Daniel also has fond memories of this period: "Module 1000 already had an acceptance; it was not a sound of a successful stop, but the staff came to see. People recorded, asked, knew the songs already by name, even sang together in Latin! Everywhere we went, there were car commissions accompanying us. " 

The convictions could be strong as to musical direction, but the goal was also to record, after all. Through a contact with the pair of composers Sérgio Fayne and Vítor Martins (later partner of Ivan Lins), the group got a hearing at Odeon, which was opening space in its cast for alternative groups. Following the advice of the pair, the set presented a much more accessible material, with influences of MPB and lighter sounds, which gave result, pleasing the producers. Six tracks were released in full by Odeon. While acknowledging that the effort was legitimate to reach an exclusive LP by the label, Daniel does not have much affection for these tracks: "We did all these songs, which I did not like at the time and still do not like, did not reflect our sound. At that time we did not do any of that. But the guys (Odeon) found the previous tracks interesting, and then I could do something different, which I liked more, it was the sound I was about to make. I composed something in a vein over Led Zeppelin, in that swing. I asked Candinho, 'I want this John Bonham-type beat,' in which he would say, 'Fuck, I'm going to make mine.' We would fight a lot, I would say that it had to be more rock, he said that he was going to give a jazz drum, and then it would be totally different ... ". The composition in question was called "Rust and Soot," and was released in Odeon's excellent "Positions" compilation, along with the track "Curtíssima" (which was actually very short ...). Next to the Module 1000 dividing the LP, there was a team of respect, counting on the groups Som Imaginary, Tribo and Team Market. Of these, only Imaginary Sound would effectively release LPs (three) by the label.The Odeon period also allowed participation in the V International Song Festival in October 1970. They defended the song "Cafusa" (by Fayne and Martins) in the national phase, where O Terço also participated with his "Tribute to the Smile" ( ranked ninth). Eduardo recalls the importance of the event: "We got a contract with Odeon and from there we were classified for the final of the FIC, which was going to happen at Maracanãzinho. That was when we returned to Rio with another status, closer to the gods. It was on this lap that we actually started composing. " Rehearsing 8 hours a day, seven days a week, before the end of the year the Module 1000 already played all the tracks that would compose his future debut LP. Basically the material was Daniel and Luiz Paulo, with Eduardo and Candinho participating in the arrangements. Because of the Latin lyrics of "Turpe Est Sine Crine Caput," at a show in Juiz de Fora the DOPS federals took the stage, turned it off, and called on the musicians to explain the "terrible ciphered and subversive lyrics." In reality it was only "It's a fact, it's a fact, it's horrible a head with no hair ...". 

Again based in Rio, the group worked with the businessman Marinaldo Guimarães, a typical character of the time, always concerned with making the public think. The show "Open for Works" may have represented the pinnacle of its aesthetic propositions. Mounted at the Arena Theater of Largo da Carioca, the public entered through narrow corridors and was separated from the stages by fences of barbed wire. Finally discovering how to get to their seats, they had to choose between looking down, where Module 1000 was, or up, where the Rosary was. Below was also a woman preparing popcorn on a stove and later, sitting in a toilet, Jorge Amiden's brother (d'O Rosário) wielding a static guitar for three hours at a time, only to rip him off at the end of everything. In the middle of the audience, several painters, among them Wander Borges, who would make the cover of the LP of the band. "Among the concerts we did in Rio," recalls Luiz Paulo, "I remember the Teatro da Praia, with the 'Lion of the Metro' projected on the curtains before they opened, mannequins scattered around the audience and I debuting with the first synthesizer in the Rio (maybe in Brazil?) - my Synthi A from the English EMS factory. Our manager was very close to happenings, avant-garde and the like, and he always gave us strength when things went that way. " The group also experimented with finding new sounds, creating the "mandum", their version of the talk-box (voice bag).
It was at that moment that Ademir Lemos's invitation to the recording of an LP by Top Tape appeared in 1971. The big problem was that the studio would only be available if the recording was done immediately, and the group was in a moment of transition between the material from the previous year and a new phase of the repertoire. However, the new material was not yet polished enough, whereas those songs of 1970 were already more than right. Not to let the opportunity escape, the solution was to record that repertoire that was already far behind, and was not even played live. 

In Musidisc's modest studio the sound technicians did not welcome the experimentation of the set. The Leslie boxes of the organ, the echoes, the placement of the amplifier in the bathroom (where else could you get that sound? Even Deep Purple did these things ...), guitars etched backwards, it was all a pain in the ass for Valter, the chief technician. The studio was available to the group, and although the technicians, unaccustomed to the whole madness, found the results horrible and "dirty", the beer always ended up distracting their attention, and the album was thus finished. The expensive triple cover, with psychedelic illustrations by Wander Borges, seems to have been inspired by the Daniel track that gave the album its name: "Walls were the obstacles people had in order to express their political, sexual, . The walls always existed inside our own house ... I was not a political guy but at the time guys always filled your bag. " The Rolling Stone newspaper, in its national issue of issue 4 (January 21, 1972), featured a full-page ad: "Our sound is the sound of the world, to be drawn and tanned" - Module 1000, quartet and the cover of the disc, bringing only the name of the band, the disc and the producer Ademir.
The final result of these troubled sessions, the LP "Do not Talk With Walls", did not have, as would be imagined, a reception of the warmest. At that time, Zezinho, the director of the Rio de Janeiro Top Tape label, was already somewhat sorry to have given carte blanche to Ademir Lemos - also known in the dances as DJ Ademir - then on Top Tape (with the success of his "Heavy" discs). At the time when the gap was opened for the Ademir to produce some records, the disc jockey soon remembered the friends of Module 1000, who had already performed several dances with him. He indicated the band, took responsibility for their quality and produced the LP himself. When Zezinho finally heard the work, the LP was already pressed and ready to go to the stores. He knew that Brazilian rock no longer gave much money, even more ... That!
The four Musicians of the 1000 Module had been very lucky to have achieved in full 1971 - even if in a small record company - that all production for an LP. Even though Musidisc's studio was modest and the sound technicians unprepared for all that news, Ademir had given them complete freedom to record whatever they wanted. When they finally talked to the director, they already knew beforehand that he was very annoyed with the record. Arriving at his office, he went straight to the point: "This record sucks!" What he did not expect was Daniel's response: "So you're going to have to eat this whole shit, because you were a bad guy, did not show up on recordings to see which band you were playing with, so fuck you." This did not really help the group's situation at the label, but either way the album eventually went to the stores. After all, people knew that it would be virtually impossible for another record company to accept what they did, without any restriction.
Analyzing the musical context of the time under perspective, the director of Top Tape had his reasons there for not having liked the work. Commercially speaking, the album was a suicide. If not even the weekly exposure on TV Globo's "Som Livre Exportação" program guaranteed a lot of return to the Mutantes and O Terço, cutting-edge ensembles of the time, what to expect then from the hard psychedelia "pauleira" of Módulo 1000, influenced by Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin, and also with letters in Latin ??? This sound practically did not exist in the country. The very little space that was given to rock was for foreign bands, and it was a sacrifice to take notice of shows and national rock releases, despite the goodwill of the Brazilian Rolling Stone (short lived in these arid soils). Since the 1960s, survival has been in playing foreign material in dances, or getting work with some successful artist such as A Bubha (Top Tape companions and direct competitors of the Module 1000, because their entrepreneurs did not get drunk a lot ..) .) would do later, playing with Erasmo Carlos.
The disagreement with the direction of the label did not, however, prevent the group from releasing another compact by Top Tape. In that decade, a great source of income from these stamps were the Brazilian artists, under pseudonyms and recording in English (the Mark Davies of life ...). Daniel remembers with difficulty the details: "Someone came and said that he had so many hours of studio, if we did not want to do something with a different name, like Love Machine. Our reaction was not euphoric, especially since the pay was not at all fantastic. Maybe we did it because Ademir was our friend, he arranged a record for us, and Zezinho might be happier if we recorded some cool songs in English. Side A, 'Cancer Stick', was almost a rap, me speaking in full voice over the malice of the cigarette, and Ademir coughing in the background. 'Waitin' For Tomorrow 'was composed the day before and quickly finished in the studio. " 

Of the group's work still in 1972, Daniel continues: "In fact, the new material was completely different from LP, it was a concern not to repeat itself. It had 'Lages Cadaverinas', 'Seven Rooms' (one song, guess what, in progress 7/4!), 'Radish Liqueur', 'Barren Look', 'Naked'. We explored the broken bars more, making a greater dialogue of riffs that did not exist before. In addition to the guitar, there was already a synthesizer, and a Farfisa organ. Sonorously the concept changed, we changed the whole style - there was a lot of random and a lot of things marked, with a punch that was missing before. We even did the use of cavaquinho and mandolin in a very different context. " This new phase was also striking for Eduardo: "We were starting a show at the Teatro da Praia in Copacabana, when I broke my bass guitar string. I tried to mend, I tried to play without using the staff, I could not. Candinho told me: 'Man, I think you need a shock to see if you change.' He was absolutely right! From then on I started to compose just like a madman. This new phase of the Module 1000, which was not registered, was very important for me, because I was assured of my capacity and creativity. If I am not mistaken, Daniel or Luiz Paulo, one of the two made a comment, soon after a show, that the best music of the Module of this phase had been created by me! "Despite the lack of prospects for a second album, several shows and events still boosted the band. In 1972 they were invited by the Government to reopen the acoustic shell of Brasilia. With no less than 46 speakers connected to the PA, the rumble could be heard 3km away. The following year the group would participate in the third outdoor festival in Brazil, "Transa-Som-Folk-Rock-Pop in the Sertão", in the Jequitinhonha Valley, alongside DJ Ademir, Rui Maurity, Jorge Mello and Serguei. "An absolutely surrealistic event, in an absolutely surrealistic place too", in the words of Luiz Paulo, "All armed by the son of a farmer of the region. The locals had never seen hairy, never heard rock. It was a scare! " 

In the mid-'73, the story of Module 1000 comes to its final chapter. "I think it was for lack of prospects and money. No one really fought, "says Luiz Paulo. That same year would be marked as the beginning of a kind of boom in Brazilian rock. Gradually, it became (relatively) easier to release and release a record. The recently launched Pop magazine was already in the position of the late Rolling Stone, and in Rio de Janeiro, the historic Eldopop FM radio was broadcasting, which would change various concepts and implement new musical patterns in the minds of many people. Despite all this, all those years of struggle had worn out the group quite a bit. In Daniel's words: "The expectation was to release a second album, but the mood was no longer the same. The last thing I remember from the band's last days was after a winter festival in Juiz de Fora. We came talking, me and Luiz Paulo, of the personal reasons that led us to some wear and tear. We set up a meeting, if I'm not mistaken in Alto da Boa Vista, and we agreed that the band should really end. Each one was going to follow his path ... Luiz Paulo, for example, was already getting in touch with Lulu Santos, of Veludo Elétrico, to set up another band ".
And that's what really came to pass. After the end of the Module 1000, Luiz Paulo and Candinho joined Fernando Gama (bass), formerly Veludo Elétrico, and formed the mythological Vímana. Shortly after Lulu Santos (guitar) completed the training that participated in the festivals Banana Progressiva and Hollywood Rock in 1975. When the group released in 1977 a piece by Som Livre, "Zebra", Candinho had already been replaced by Lobão and Ritchie Court had taken up the flute and vocals. This was the only work of the band published (in fact, a whole LP was actually recorded, never to be released). The Vímana would split up the following year, with its final months being dedicated to a partnership with keyboardist Patrick Moraz (N.E .: ex-Yes) that did not materialize, leaving only a few tracks recorded in the studio and abandoned. Some time later, Ritchie would still propose a partnership with Daniel, showing him his new job, much more direct and focused to the market. However, despite all the obvious commercial potential of those songs, "Poison Girl" was a little too far away from Daniel's goals ... Luiz Paulo, in turn, started to create tracks and jingles for movies and TV (interestingly, he is the creator of the famous "plim-plim" of Globo), also participating in tours and recordings of various artists. On a single occasion he met Daniel and Candinho again, in one of the six days of the show at the Carioca Planetarium. Other guests also participated in the event Sérgio Dias, Cláudio Nucci, Marçalzinho and Liminha. In 1989 he moved to New York, where, faithful to his musical roots, he dedicated himself to Brazilian rhythms, having already released some CDs. In 2007 he released the "Cafuné" CD in the USA and Brazil. Your current work can be checked on their website, http://www.luizsimas.com. Candinho, possibly inspired by Luiz Paulo, also migrated to the United States, and currently resides in Florida, working with crafts and still playing drums. Eduardo moved to Brasília and currently devotes part of his time to the activity of musician (now in keyboards) and composer, having two new age CDs already released, as well as own compositions recorded by local scene artists. At the moment it develops its new work, called "Opera Leiga do Cerrado". Daniel eventually turned to work as a studio musician, also devoting himself to giving guitar lessons and consulting on the instrument. For over ten years he has been working continuously on the "Four Walls" project, reflecting his development as a musician over the last three decades, as well as his interest in progressive and ethnic music. Finally, Paulo César Willcox, after leaving the group, worked as a studio musician and arranger during the rest of the seventies, very respected among his peers, having died of a heart attack at the end of that decade.Nowadays, to the surprise of the musicians themselves, who considered the album almost buried, "Não Fale Con Paredes" continues to arouse interest from collectors and fans from all over the world. Several web pages collect passionate appreciations about the band, always elevating the album to the category of "masterpiece" of Brazilian hard-prog-psych. Recent CD and LP reissues (not always official, but with reasonable quality of recording and presentation, faithfully reproducing all the graphic work and the triple cover, such as the vinyl edition and CD of the German "World in Sound" label) available on a larger scale. Original LP editions, however, remain avidly coveted around the world. Distributed in specialist retailers' catalogs and virtual auction sites, they easily reach the price of a few hundred dollars. All these factors together help keep the aura of Module 1000 still bright today, and although not responsible for creating any musical style, it was one of the honorable pioneers in the introduction of progressive rock in Brazilian lands. Ipso facto!......~








Credits 
Bass – Eduardo 
Drums – Candinho 
Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Vocals – Daniel 
Organ, Piano, Vocals, Liner Notes [Reissue] – Luiz Paulo













Recorded in Rio De Janeiro, 1971. Originally released on vinyl in the early 70's in Brazil. 
This reissue comes with the original cover artwork, presented in a triple fold hardcover.

Tracklist 
A1 Turpe Est Sine Crine Caput 6:13 
A2 Não Fale Com Paredes 3:23 
A3 Espêlho 2:45 
A4 Lem.Ed.Êcalg 1:15 
B1 Ôlho Por Ôlho, Dente Por Dente 4:52 
B2 Metrô Mental 6:16 
B3 Teclados 1:24 
B4 Salve-Se Quem Puder 3:51 
B5 Animália 1:45 

Bonus 
10 Big Mama
11 Isto Não Quer Dizer Nada
12 Gloriosa
13 Cafusa
14 Curtíssima
15 Ferrugem E Fuligem
Love Machine 
16 The Cancer Stick
17 Waiting For Tomorrow




Love Machine  "The Cancer Stick / Waitin' For Tomorrow" 1972 single 7" Brazil Psych Rock

Rare single of legendary Brazilian group Módulo 1000, but with the pseudonym Love Machine. The single was released in 1972 by Top Tape, with two songs composed by guitarist Daniel Romani. The songs "The Cancer Stick" and "Waitin 'for Tomorrow" are sung in English, bringing a good psychedelic rock. Second song is a good jam with heavy drums and guitar and the first is a message anti-tobacco and coughs in the background, with a lot of brass and percussion.. 

Credits 
Bass Guitar – Eduardo Leal 
Drums – Candinho 
Electric Guitar, Lead Vocals – Daniel Cardone 
Keyboards, Piano – Luiz Simas

Tracklist 
A The Cancer Stick
B Waitin' For Tomorrow 





























Discography

Módulo 1000 

Big Mama / Isto não quer dizer Nada 
compacto simples, Odeon 1970 

Gloriosa (Fayne - Martins) 
LP coletânea “Juventude”, Odeon 1970 

Cafusa (Fayne - Martins) 
LP do V Festival da Canção Vol. 1, Odeon 1970 

Curtíssima (Simas - Martins - Romani) 
Ferrugem e Fuligem (Simas - Martins - Romani) 
LP “Posições” junto com Som Imaginário, Tribo e Equipe Mercado, Odeon 1971. Relançado como Série Vanguarda Vol. 1 (Odeon, anos 70). 

Não Fale Com Paredes 
Todas as faixas de autoria de Módulo 1000, exceto faixa título com Vitor Martins. Produzido por Módulo 1000 e Ademir Lemos. 
LP Top Tape 1971/72 

Love, Peace & Poetry 
Latin American Psychedelic Music 
Inclui Lem-Ed-Êcalg, do LP acima, QDK 1998 

Love Machine 

The Cancer Stick / Waitin’ For Tomorrow 
compacto simples com nome e composições sob pseudônimo, Top Tape 1972 

Eduardo Leal 

Kalma 1997 Independente 
Fluxo 1999 Independente 

Luiz Paulo Simas 

New Chorinhos from Brazil, Lydjul Music 1996 
Recipe for Rythmn, Lydjul Music 1998 
Impromptu, mp3.com 2001 
Cafuné, independente 2007 


Participação especial: Luiz Paulo Simas toca sintetizador e órgão na suíte Amanhecer Total 
LP O Terço - Continental 1973 

Vímana 

Zebra / Masquerade 
lado B autoria de Simas - Ritchie - Vímana 
compacto simples, Som Livre 1977 
Faixas disponíveis na coletânea e-collection de Lulu Santos - WEA 2000 

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