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Wednesday, 2 May 2018

The Move ‎ “Move” 1968 UK Psych Pop debut album


The Move ‎ “Move” 1968 UK Psych Pop debut album 
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A delightful artifact of pop-art, post-mod psychedelia, the Move’s debut roars with 13 songs of snazzy, hard rocking pop that reads like the hyperactive love child of Magical Mystery Tour and The Who Sell Out – only the three perfunctory covers (Eddie Cochran, Moby Grape, and the Coasters – Cochran’s “Weekend,” is good fun, but all three are unnecessary) mar an otherwise near-perfect album. The Move at this stage are presented at their most pop and accessible, bashing out one potential single after the other; it’s hard to choose between the sugary goodies. The bizarre juxtaposition of lightweight bubblegummy and heavy apocalyptic elements stakes an entirely unique turf for the Move, ensuring that no other band would ever sound quite like them – the anthemic opener, “Yellow Rainbow,” combines that hippy-dippy image with the earth falling into the abyss. “Kilroy Was Here,” employs such a corny lyrical conceit to supremely catchy affect, while “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree,” and “Flowers in the Rain,” (I get'em confused sometimes) are the type of mid-‘60s nursery rhyme singles that you catch yourself stupidly humming while your rational brain in vain tries to reject such bubblegum rot. The two message songs, “Walk On the Water,” (“Please don’t drink and drive”) and “Useless Information,” (about, you know, useless information like some old lady telling you about her operation and the weatherman telling you it’s going to be cold in December), are better. The two orchestrated ballads, “Girl Outside,” and “Mist on a Monday Morning,” are lovely, but the cabaret lizard in lead singer Carl Wayne is already obvious. “Fire Brigade,” remains a stunning whirligig single that obviously had the blinding effect of fresh sunlight upon a young Bryan Ferry. Another single, “Cherry Blossom Clinic,” was hastily withdrawn at the last minute due to its controversial subject of mental insanity; it was vastly improved on the next album, as the version here is much too muddy (plus it’s only 3 minutes long, without the cool coda of “Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited”). All of the elements for rock stardom are here, and the Move were in England; but undoubtedly due to the fact that they only toured America once for three weeks, they went practically unheard on the other side of the Atlantic….~


The 1960s albums are sometimes hard to rate, because they actually don’t sound very good. You know: if you turn on your computer, load your Cubase / Nuendo / Pro-Tools with a synth software, and create some material with a basic idea of musical scales, the result immediately sounds more hi-fi or even high-quality than the average damn-hard-worked stuff from the sixties. The Move isn’t a most smashing experience on mono, but here you have stereo versions of 16 songs as well and, abracadabra, hocus pocus, that something is really changed. Listening to the 2-CD issue you can ignore the mono versions except where a stereo mix isn’t available (“Yellow Rainbow”, “Disturbance”, “Wave the Flag and Stop the Train”, “I Can Hear the Grass Grow”, and “Hey Grandma” if you need that at all) and the only exception where the mono mix is probably better, “Cherry Blossom Clinic” (the stereo mix having dropped the horns). 
Besides, this issue contains a whole lot of great outtakes and tracks from early single releases. “Move”, the band’s unofficial theme song, is great: why on earth did they shelve this? “Don’t Throw Stones at Me” is fine too. And what could a Move re-issue be without “Night of Fear” and “I Can Hear the Grass Grow”? Here you have them…..by….fairyeee …~


One of the things i always wonder is how do certain bands come up with such LAME band names? Well THE MOVE literally refers to the shifting positions of band members from one band to another. Yeah, lame, i know but luckily the music of THE MOVE on their debut album MOVE is far from lame. This is yet one of a gazillion bands to have emerged from Birmingham, England in the 60s. This is a band that had significant success in their native UK by scoring a total of 20 hit singles in a five year span but had absolutely no success in the US or other English speaking countries which meant their career was a fairly short seven year span but a sweet one nonetheless. While the band was known for its innovative and progressive leanings beginning on their second album “Shazam,” on this debut album they are all about psychedelic pop and were one of the main shakers of the short lived genre called “freakbeat” which incorporated many aspects of the early British beat scene with psychedelic elements like studio effects and stereophonic embellishments as to give it a strange contemporary achronistic feel at the same time. 

What can i say about THE MOVE’s first album? Well, it is very catchy psychedelic pop music from 1968. The main influence seems to be The Beatles, who apparently left a vacuum in the 60s pop world when they jettisoned the predictability of the early and mid 60s and moved on to proto-progressive releases such as “Sgt Pepper’s” and ushered in an entirely new “free expression” musical world. Well, not everyone was ready for the liberation of this sort and that’s why bands like The Monkees were manufactured and other bands like THE MOVE hungrily moved into the formerly occupied musical territory. While the 60s were burgeoning with psychedelic pop bands from all corners of the globe, THE MOVE were actually quite talented in this niche and they nailed the psychedelic pop sound they were going for. Yes, this does sound like it should have been released 3 or 4 years prior before the advent of Hendrix, Pink Floyd and Zappa, however for 60s pop music that takes its antecedents and compiles them into a whole and fine tunes all of these elements, this is pretty good. There is not one bad track on here and it sounds like every track on this debut could have been a pop single of the era. 

The Beatles seem to have the biggest influence on this one with extremely catchy hooks that mostly utilize guitars, bass and drums but have piano, harpsichord, brass and woodwind orchestral embellishments on many (especially ending) tracks. There is also an element of sunshine pop like the type of The Turtles but also the cover tracks by Eddie Cochran and The Coasters bring an element of good old fashioned 50s rock ’n’ roll to the mix. This album also has a very strong sense of pacing. It begins quite innocently in the sunshine psychedelic pop arena but as ti progresses adds more complexity, most of the time bringing The Beatles to mind, but often meandering into the Baroque pop of The Beach Boys. While this is 60s pop through and through, the sophistication of it all is very much appreciated. Yes, the sound is a bit anachronistic but only by a few years. The fact is that every track on here is extremely catchy and well performed. I particularly love the energy delivered by bassist Ace Kefford who ups the energetic feel of the era a bit. While the ideas may be recycled for the most part, the delivery is very contemporary. This album was a grower. Nothing progressive at this point but if you like excellently performed 60s psychedelic music then you cannot forego such a wonderful experience as THE MOVE’s very first album. I personally enjoy this one very much….by….siLLy puPPy ….~



Psych Pop Majesty 
The Move’s take on psychedelia is in a similar vein to The Zombies with their album of the same year Odessey and Oracle. That is to say it’s not very psychedelic, rather just very well made pop rock tracks with light touches of experimentation, though I would say this is album is probably a bit more psychedelic than Odessey. 

Side 1 of this album is immaculate you have seven tracks of pop majesty each one providing a brilliant catchy chorus, great harmonies and lovely instrumentation, but nothing very progressive. “Flowers In The Rain” is the particular highlight of side 1 for me and was released as a stand alone single by them in the previous year I believe. There’s also a half decent cover of Moby Grape’s great “Hey Grandma” too that ends this side. 

Side 2 starts with “Useless Information” which is my favourite track off this album with it’s fantastic vocal melodies and interesting lyrics which are as profound as we get on this record. Then the album starts to explore different sounds with “Zing! Went The Strings Of My Heart” which is an old fashioned doowop tune. The rest of the album returns again to the pop rock sound but with a bit more unconventionality amongst the instrumentation than most of the tracks off the first side, but it’s still quite conventional music compared to what else was going on in '68. The album finishes off with “Cherry Blossom Clinic” which would be revisited on their next album “Shazam”. 

But all in all this is a very strong psych pop album and delivers more than a handful of catchy immaculate tracks to sing along too. I have to say I’m slightly confused as to why The Zombies Odessey and Oracle is considered to be of a much higher calibre as I find both that album and this to be very similar in terms of quality and sound. So suffice to say if you are a fan of The Zombies like myself you will find a a lot to enjoy on this release, it’s a great record….by….psychlove ….~


Great pop rock album from the often overlooked band, The Move. All but three songs on this album are absolutely terrific from “Kilroy Was Here” to “Cherry Blossom Clinic”. There’s the pop rock of “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree”, “Flowers In The Rain”, and “Fire Brigade” and there’s also the orchestral rock of “The Girl Outside” and “Mist On A Monday Morning”. Other outstanding cuts include their cover of Eddie Cochrane’s “Weekend”, “Walk Upon The Water”, and the bizarre “Cherry Blossom Clinic”. This album never hit big in the states and it’s a shame because we missed out on a fantastic group. If you like 60s pop rock or just rock in general you should enjoy this album. If you can find it you should definitely Check This Out!….by…bvb1123 S…~


The only real difference I could find between this Japanese edition and the German reissue on Repertoire is, obviously, the pricetag. I guess I expected more in the way of a good booklet, but it’s mostly Japanese text with little info on the actual tracks themselves, which is detailed better on the DEU release. There’s the LP replica packaging, lyrics (in both English & Japanese), and the 20-bit remastering (according to the obi). Unless you’re hemorrhaging money, I’d say go for the Repertoire release. 

As for the music, it speaks for itself, a brilliant debut and one of the best surprises of 1968, even if it was mostly ignored in the States. It just seems impossible to tire of “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree” and “Fire Brigade”, but the song that really hits me the hardest with each succesive spin is “Walk Upon the Water”. That said, “Zing Went the Strings of My Heart” is rubbish. As for the bonus tracks, I’m not a stereo fan, but these versions are very well mixed considering the year they come from, so they get the thumbs up. The bonus singles are essential to the album and should exist on every digital version. The previously unreleased b-side, “Vote for Me”, however, is quite obvious why it never appeared before now….by…SkinnyRobbie …..~


Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree 
Thunderingly told or whispered in hushed tones there is a myth that states that the Move were a great band who never really delivered a great album. Listening to the expanded edition of their debut, however, I can’t help but think the naysayers are way off. 
This is top to bottom creme de la creme British Invasion, exuberant pop art vignettes that highlight the genius Roy Wood has always possessed for short bursts of humorous, impossibly British melodies which stay with you long after their duration. 
Maybe only the Bonzos had as developed a sense of humour as the guys in the Move, other groups from the era were undeniably silly but the Move somehow managed to be genuinely funny. Who else would have written lyrics about sitting in the rainy mud watching flowers grow or put on an actual record a ridiculous oddity like “Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart” where the beyond awful deep voice of Bev Bevan gets tossed upfront. 
Because, as far as singers are concerned there’s a fair share of variety and most members do get their turn, naturally I prefer the quirky voice of Roy Wood, with his slightly macabre nasal tendencies complementing perfectly his off-kilter compositions, plus in the early days some naivete was also around. 
The Move have grown monstruosly on me, I’ve gone from liking a handful of tunes, accepting they were good and finally seeing addiction beckon in the horizon for their cartoony roller coaster. 
Classics for the ages include most songs, apart from the cover of Moby Grape’s “Hey Grandma” or “Weekend”. Particular faves would range from the lovely merry-go-round of “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree” (there’s a fine version of it by Jeff Lynne’s Idle Race), “Flowers in the Rain”, the phenomenal mid song break in “Kilroy Was Here”, the high octane drive of the “Fire Brigade”, Girl Outside" or “Useless Information”…by….Tezcatlipoca …..~


The Move’s debut album expanded to a deluxe 2 CD set. Features four Top 5 hits (including Flowers In the Rain) and a wealth of previously unreleased tracks including brand new stereo mixes of the entire album. Remastered from original master tapes by Rob Keyloch at Church Walk Studio, the music here has never sounded better. Stylish double digipack with 20 page booklet designed by Grammy award winner Rachel Gutek and containing rare and previously unseen photographs plus detailed, authoritative notes by Mojo’s Mark Paytress. In short it was pop psychedelic masterpiece and Salvo is now proud to present the most comprehensive and beautifully realised reissue of 'Move’ yet. Immaculately remastered and expanded to a 90-minute deluxe 2-CD set, it is sure to get the band’s existing fans, as well as 60s pop and psychedelic rock enthusiasts in a lather. It includes the classic hits 'Flowers In the Rain’, 'Fire Brigade’, 'I Can Hear The Grass Grow’ and 'Night Of Fear’, rare B-sides and a wealth previously unreleased songs.Salvo 2007…~


I’m not sure what cd the guy who described this wonderful release as poorly mastered was listening to, but either we got different masterings, or our ears just plain hear things starkly differently. I was, I must admit, skeptical of this release, as the 1997 Repertoire release was so wonderfully mastered and absolutely chock full of bonus tracks, 16 all told. However, the fine lot at Salvo tempted my once I obtained their wonderful sounding, but short on running time, 4 cd box set “Anthology.” Much to my relief and delight, this double disc release not only adds even more bonus tracks, 21 in all, and lovely studio banter among the band members, but is deliciously sounding. To my ears at least. No noticeable noise reduction to my admittedly amateurish sonic receptors. Sounds warm and fuzzy to me. But I’m a record collector not a perfectionist audiophile, so perhaps I’m missing something somewhere. My take on this release is that the fine folks at Salvo took great efforts to obtain the master tapes, did a bang up job of remastering the sound, and gave us about 14 minutes of additional music. Roy Wood and company’s debut album is a pure delight. While the band never quite fit into any convenient pigeonhole, they surely did produce some wonderful pop pscyh singles early on, before maturing into a heavier rock band on later releases. My advice, if you’ve got the Reperoire piece, still in print by the way, grab this one for comparison sake. It can be obtained inexpensively from drop shippers. If you don’t have this cd in your collection and psychedelic music is your preference or among your tastes, get this double disc 40th anniversary release and give it a spin. My money says you’ll be delighted. If not, bash my review and set me straight. As for the music itself, many brilliant singles appear here, among them, “Flowers In The Rain” “Fire Brigade” “Night of Fear” and “I Can Hear The Grass Grow.” The first three available in both the original as well as previously unreleased mixes. The rest of the album is good British psychedelia, including a cover of Moby Grape’s classic “Hey Grandma.” There’s nary a weak link in the chain of tunes found on this deluxe release. The piece is worth full retail, but availabale much more reasonably through drop shippers. Show your support for both Roy Wood and company, and the fledgling, but dynamic Salvo label and pick up this set. Then judge for yourself. I’m betting you love it…..by…..Kevin D. Rathert….~


What was I thinking initially criticizing the Move’s debut? I’m a foolish person. Obviously I expected something else but to criticize this album and give it anything less than 5 stars was really ignorant on my part. I apologize! This has actually been bothering me for a couple weeks now which is why I went back and listened to the Move’s debut again to hopefully get a better perspective the second time around and did I ever! For a couple weeks now I’ve been sitting here thinking “You know I really should go back and listen to the Move’s debut again”. I was probably expecting another Looking On or Shazam when I originally wrote my review and instead got a late 60’s psych/pop album instead. Well duh! This is 1968 after all. Like that’s a problem anyway, right? I was in a picky mood when I wrote my original review so here’s an updated one. The only problem is that the way the music was recorded sounds obnoxiously loud and upfront in a way that’s initially unappealing and rough as concrete which can affect ones ability to approach the music. Maybe that was another problem I had with the album originally, who knows. 

“Yellow Rainbow” begins on a perfect note. A perfect psych/pop song if there ever was one. And it’s not like this is the only example of such type of music- “Kilroy Was Here”, “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree”, “Walk Upon the Water”, and “Flowers in the Rain” are all some of the best psych/pop I’ve ever heard. HEAVY British psych might I add. “Flowers in the Rain” is probably my favorite song here. Is that a synth being played in the chorus? Its inclusion is unique. For me to originally slam this stuff is a mystery to me. I was being foolish! I can’t state this enough! I’d even go so far as to put these songs on the same level of quality as the stuff you’d find from the Who’s the Who Sells Out or Pink Floyd’s The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. Or the Lemon Pipers, Turtles, Strawberry Alarm Clock, etc. Roy Wood’s influence is all over this stuff. Proof that he’s a genius on the same level as Jeff Lynne. Well honestly if I had to pick, I think Jeff Lynne is a bit *more* of a genius pertaining to the ability to create insanely catchy and creative vocal melodies. They’re both very awesome songwriters however. 

“Hey Grandma” sounds really familiar… why is that? Nah I’m just kidding with ya! It’s a Moby Grape cover and it’s a really good one! I almost forgot all about the Moby Grape tune and thought the Move was ripping off somebody when I replayed this album earlier this morning. Nah, it’s just a cover tune. “Weekend” is another cover song and it’s an AMAZING one! It branches away from the psychedelic stuff and just rocks out. “Useless Information” is probably my second favorite song. Well honestly “Yellow Rainbow” is my second favorite tune but this one comes next! Yes my friends, the world is full of useless information. If only Roy Wood knew just how much useless stuff there is nowadays he’d scream! 

“Zing Went the Strings of my Heart” is another cover song. This is a song in the same category as “Stand By Me” or “Blue Moon” (thanks amazon for confusing me for several minutes by not posting my review and assuming I’m calling someone a racist towards Italians by describing what the song is really like even though I’m simply describing the genre it falls under- amazon has a problem with that word apparently! You know the word- it comes after “doo” and begins with the letter “w”. Amazon doesn’t like it!) Anyway I LOVE these songs! The Move does a fantastic job with this cover version. “The Girl Outside” is another highlight. Well besides the whole album being a highlight I mean, haha. This song totally sounds like early Neil Diamond with subtle Electric Light Orchestra-like arrangements. Awesome song! Very sad and ballad-like with a remarkable carefree vocal melody. “Fire Brigade” is definitely rough from a sound quality point of view which is especially the case whenever these guys rock out. The production of the recording just can’t keep up with the occasional heaviness they utilize. Awesome song though and I like how the John Mellencamp-like “The Authority Song” guitar riff appears occasionally. “Mist on a Monday Morning” is another astonishing highlight due to its colorful gentle vocal melody and vibrant variety of arrangements. Gee the whole album is a highlight folks, haha. It really is! “Cherry Blossom Clinic” ends the album on a nice psych/pop note. I wish the song was a couple minutes longer…..By Bryan…~


There’s a good reason why the Move’s eponymous 1968 debut album sounds like the work of two or three different bands – actually, befitting a band with multiple lead singers, there’s more than one reason. First, there’s that lead singer conundrum. Carl Wayne was the group’s frontman, but Roy Wood wrote the band’s original tunes and sometimes took the lead, and when the group covered a rock & roll class, they could have rhythm guitarist Trevor Burton sing (as they did on Eddie Cochran’s “Weekend”) or drummer Bev Bevan (as they did on the Coasters’ “Zing Went the Strings of My Heart”). Such ever-changing leads can lend excitement but it can also lend confusion, especially when the group enthusiastically mixes up Who-inspired art pop with three-chord rock & roll oldies and more than a hint of British eccentricity. Add to that, the album had a long, convoluted birth of 14 months, a long span of time in pop music, but it was an eternity in the mid-'60s, when styles and sounds were changing monthly. The Move were releasing singles during this time so they weren’t absent from the scene, but they did happen to be set upon a course of cutting singles when their peers were crafting album-length epics, something that separated them from the pack, making them seem eccentric…and the Move needed no help in seeming eccentric. In an age filled with outsized originals, the Move may have been the most peculiar, not quite fitting into any particular scene or sound. They rivaled the Who in their almost violent power, but were almost entirely devoid of Mod style, despite the “Ace” nickname of bassist Chris Kefford. They were as defiantly British as the Kinks, but during 1967 and 1968 they were more closely tied to psychedelia than the Davies brothers, producing intensely colorful records like “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree” and “I Can Hear the Grass Grow,” songs that owed a heavy debt to the Beatles. Indeed, the Move were arguably at the forefront of the second wave of the British Invasion, building upon the bright, exuberant sound of 1964 and 1965 and lacking any rooting in the jazz and blues that fueled the Rolling Stones, the Animals, and Manfred Mann, among countless others. 

The Move sounded so new that their 1968 debut still sounds unusual, ping-ponging between restless, kaleidoscopic pop and almost campy salutes to early rock & roll, punctuated by the occasional foray into the English countryside and, with the closing “Cherry Blossom Clinic,” psychic nightmare. Much of this oddity can be ascribed to Roy Wood, the only member to write, but the Move were certainly a collective, sounding just as off-kilter and distinctive on the aforementioned oldies covers and their version of Moby Grape’s “Hey Grandma” as they do on their originals. But it’s Wood’s originals – ranging from the stately, tightly-buttoned “Kilroy Was Here” to the carnivalesque “(Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree”; from the gentle, precious “Mist on a Monday Morning” to the perfect pop of “Fire Brigade” and “Flowers in the Rain” – that give The Move its heady rush of melody and tangible sonic textures. This is vivid, imaginative music – almost too vivid, really, as there are so many ideas that it doesn’t quite hold together as a complete LP, a curse of the prolonged sessions behind the album, surely. Nevertheless, art-pop albums are always better when there are too many ideas instead of too few, and The Move is one of the first to prove that axiom true….. by Stephen Thomas Erlewine…~


I should probably like The Move more than I do, because they hit a bunch of my soft spots: mod sound! whimsical and/or psychedelic lyrics! good musicianship! but most of their material sounds like dated reflections of more popular acts. Guitarist and chief songwriter Roy Wood had an interest in classical influences from the start, but many of his arrangements sound like someone who heard “Eleanor Rigby” and ran with it. Furthermore, producer Denny Cordell gave everything a light or tinny production, undercutting the strength of the band’s sound. If that was not frustrating enough, most of the album was only released in mono (yes, even the stereo version was mostly in mono), and not a punchy mono either. The result is that the band often sounds like A Quick One or “Pictures of Lily”-era Who, with odd little stories in their songs, lots of rhythm guitar, punchy bass and strong vocals, but then mixed with Byrdsian guitar and classical string arrangements. (The kitchen sink diversity approach extended to their vocals - despite having a dedicated singer (Carl Wayne) who was like Tom Jones if Jones was cool and not hammy, Wood also sang a lot of tracks, and the others got spotlights as well). Almost everything on Move sounds like it would fit on a single, and the best tracks were from the band’s two latest singles: “Fire Brigade” is hands-down the best track, an uptempo pop song with Wood adding little Byrdsian guitar phrases. “The Lemon Tree” and the trippy “Flowers in the Rain” are also both fine pop songs, with a good match of catchy melodies and goofy period lyrics. The remainder is a lot of pop songs with slight psych production flourishes, sometimes undone by Wood’s lyrics (“Yellow Rainbow” with some backwards drums and Wayne singing about “find the yellow rainbow”). But a lot of it sounds like a heftier take on pop acts like The Beatles, and the band comes across as followers. (There are also two out of place covers, Eddie Cochran’s “Weekend” and “Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart.” The former is understandable - even The Who recorded Cochran’s “Summertime Blues” around this time, but wisely didn’t release the studio version. The latter is junk.) Power-pop, but with the power cut. 
It probably did not help that the band’s first two singles (which are also pretty good) were on a different label, and not included on the album. The album was never released in the US. …..~


It’s one of those odd quirks of fate why sixties beat group The Move never became as big as say The Who, Kinks or the Dave Clark Five or even (crikey!) The Beatles or The Stones. There are many reasons as to why this never happened—top of the tree is the fact The Move never broke the American market which limited their success primarily to a large island off the coast of Europe. Secondly, The Move was all too often considered a singles band—and here we find another knotty problem. 

The Move, under the sublime writing talents of Roy Wood, produced singles of such quality, range and diversity it was not always possible to identify their unique imprint. They evolved from “pioneers of the psychedelic sound” with their debut single “Night of Fear” in 1966—a song that sampled Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture—through “I Can Hear The Grass Grow” and “Flowers In The Rain” to faster rock songs like “Fire Brigade”—which inspired the bassline for the Sex Pistols’ “God Save the Queen”—to the chirpy pop of “Curly” and “Omnibus” to sixties miserabilism “Blackberry Way” and early heavy metal/prog with “Wild Tiger Woman,” “Brontosaurus” and “When Alice Comes Back to the Farm.” Though there is undoubtedly a seriousness and considered process going on here—it was not necessarily one that brought together a united fan base. Those who bought “Flowers in the Rain” were not necessarily going to dig the Hendrix-influenced “Wild Tiger Woman” or groove along to “Alice Comes Back to the Farm.” 

That said, The Move scored nine top ten hits during the sixties, were critically praised, had a considerable following of screaming fans, and produced albums which although they were considered “difficult” at the time (Shazam, Looking On and Message from the Country) are now considered pioneering, groundbreaking and (yes!) even “classic.” 

The Move was made up from oddments of musicians and singers from disparate bands and club acts who would not necessarily gravitate together. Formed in December 1965, the original lineup consisted of guitarist Roy Wood (recently departed from Mike Sheridan and The Nightriders), vocalist Carl Wayne who along with bass player Chris ‘Ace’ Kefford and drummer Bev Bevan came from The Vikings, and guitarist Trevor Burton from The Mayfair Set. Each of these artists had a small taste of success—most notably Carl Wayne who had won the prestigious Golden Orpheus Song Festival in Bulgaria—but nothing that was going to satisfy their ambitions for a long and rewarding career. 

It was David Bowie—then just plain David Jones—who suggested Kefford and Burton should form their own band. They recruited Wood onto the team sheet and decided to follow another piece of Bowie’s advice to bring together the very best musicians and singers in their hometown of Birmingham. This they did. And although technically it was Kefford’s band, Carl Wayne by dint of age steered the group through their first gigs.
The Move’s greatest asset was Roy Wood—a teenage wunderkind who was writing songs about fairies and comic book characters that were mistakenly believed to have been inspired by LSD. This gave the band their counterculture edge when “Night of Fear” was released in 1966. They were thought to be acidheads tuning into the world of psychedelia a year before the Summer of Love—but as drummer Bev Bevan later recalled: 

Nobody believed that Roy wasn’t out of his head on drugs but he wasn’t. It was all fairy stories rooted in childhood. 

Young Wood and Wayne may have been squeaky clean but the rest of the band certainly enjoyed the sherbets—with one catastrophic result. 

After chart success of “Night of Fear,” The Move were expected to churn out hit after hit after hit. Though Wood delivered the goods—the financial rewards did not arrive. Ace Kefford later claimed the pressure of touring, being mobbed by fans, having clothes ripped—and once being stabbed in the eye by a fan determined to snip a lock of his hair—for the same money he made gigging with The Vikings made it all seem rather pointless. 

But their success continued apace. By 1967, The Move had three top ten hits, were the first band played on the BBC’s new flagship youth channel Radio One, and were touring across the UK and Europe. They also caused considerable controversy with their live stage act which involved Carl Wayne chopping up TV sets with an axe. While the golden youth were wearing flowers in their hair and singing about peace and love, The Move were offering agitprop political theater. 

Then they were sued by British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. 

The Move’s first manager Tony Secunda decided to promote the single “Flowers in the Rain” with a satirical postcard of PM Harold Wilson in bed with his secretary, Marcia Williams. The postcard was Secunda’s wholly idea, and had nothing to do with the band. Unfortunately, Wilson did not find the satirical caricature funny and sued for libel. He won the case. All of Wood’s royalties for the single were paid over to Wilson, who donated them to charity—a situation that continues to this day. 

By now the drugs were having a drastic effect on Ace Kefford who fried his brain with LSD. As he later told Mark Paytress for the liner notes for The Very Best of the Move his mind melted at a fancy dress party at Birmingham’s Cedar Club: 

There were all these little men sitting around me with pointed heads and big noses and long fingers that touched the floor. They were with me all night, man. Acid screwed my life up, man. It devastated me completely. 

The Move toured with Jimi Hendrix (who was a fan) and had Pink Floyd as support. They also supplied backing vocals to Hendrix’s track “You Got Me Floatin’.” Working with Hendrix sent Wood off to find a heavier sound for the band. which led to “Wild Tiger Woman” and a gradual move towards early Heavy Metal. 

When Carl Wayne quit the band—to tour the cabaret circuit—Roy Wood took over vocals and brought in Jeff Lynne from The Idle Race. Trevor Burton then quit—he (oddly) wanted The Move to be more Country and Western—so Wood brought in Rick Price from the Sight and Sound. 

Lynne proved the ideal partner for Wood. However, it was all too late and The Move were headed for the inevitable split that led to the phoenix-like creation of the Electric Light Orchestra (which originally consisted of Wood, Lynne and Bevan) before Wood quit to form Wizzard. 

How good were The Move? No point asking me, I’m biased. But if you do ask, they were very, very good. In fact, they were an excellent band who competed with The Beatles and The Stones for innovation and pop originality. However, they never won the same success, not even close. To get an idea of how good they were, take a look at their performance on Colour Me Pop from January 1969 when The Move were a four piece band consisting of Wood, Wayne, Bevan and Burton. They are tight, loud, and unlike so many over-produced bands today, sounded the same live as they did on record….. by Paul Gallagher 





Line-up / Musicians 

- Roy Wood / guitars, vocals 
- Carl Wayne / vocals 
- Trevor Burton / guitars, bass, vocals 
- Chris Ace Kefford / bass, vocals 
- Bev Bevan / drums, vocals


Tracklist 
A1 Yellow Rainbow
A2 Kilroy Was Here
A3 (Here We Go Round) The Lemon Tree
A4 Weekend
A5 Walk Upon The Water
A6 Flowers In The Rain
A7 Hey Grandma
B1 Useless Information
B2 Zing Went The Strings Of My Heart
B3 The Girl Outside
B4 Fire Brigade
B5 Mist On A Monday Morning
B6 Cherry Blossom Clinic 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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Hi`s Master`s Voice

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music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

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vinyl