Friday, 25 May 2018

Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk


Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk 
full bandcamp
https://triomocoto.bandcamp.com/album/samba-rock

full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/5aEvx8thqk7yiwO1rKTx9B


The unique samba soul sound of legendary ‘70s band Trio Mocotó returned in 2001 with ‘Samba Rock’, their first release since 1975. First brought to fame as Jorge Ben’s original backing band, the Trio’s three founding members Fritz, Nereu and João Parahyba (more recently known as Suba’s right-hand man) came back to rock the boat, bringing their energy and good vibes into our souls and dancefloors once again. Referred to by many as the “Fathers of the samba soul beat”, the band was formed in the late '60s and recorded three albums, which have now become collectors’ items sought out by DJs the world over. The Trio was back at full strength: their super-original grooves and vocals, their innovative power and tremendous humor and charm are not only intact, they are rejuvenated by Fritz, Nereu and João Parahyba’s fresh new take on the style they contributed to create…..~

Waiting 26 years between releases has to be some kind of record. But so is Samba Rock. Having first gained notoriety as Jorge Ben’s backing band in 1969, Brazilian "samba soul” pioneers Trio Mocotó released three influential albums in the 1970s before packing it up. Renewed interest in vintage Latin recordings spurred the Trio to reunite for their latest release, and it’s far from an exercise in nostalgia. The group holds on to its core style of innovative vocal arrangements and flirtations with soul, funk, and jazz while also presenting a cartoonish ambiance that leaves lesser mortals frowning in the dust. But the 21st-century Trio also seamlessly blends modern sensibilities with its venerable minimoog, updating “Voltei Amor” with subtle electronica and energizing Jorge Ben’s “Adelita” with a vigorous tropical rock attack that complements the all-out party atmosphere. Even Antonio Carlos Jobim’s classic “Aguas de Marco” (“The Waters of March”) gets an unexpectedly loosey-goosey reading via an instrumental whose lead voice is provided by the percussive whine of the cuica (best known for the background whoops in Paul Simon’s “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard”). Backed by supple horn players, keyboardists, drummers, and more, the Trio miraculously fuses various styles from different eras without ever straining the essential samba sensibility. While the out-there approach may not suit every listener, it will definitely delight anyone with a healthy sense of fun. –Bob Tarte……..~
First, I’d have to agree with Amazon’s chosen critical review wholeheartedly. It isn’t that the group sounds like Brave Combo as such, but they do have a similar, unleashed sense of fun romping around various musical styles, and sometimes you end up with a huge, somewhat baffled smile on your face. “Cyrano” sounds like a strange combination of 70’s rock, samba, and theme music for a TV show of the Munsters variety. It is a blast. “Pensando Nela” is a bossa nova with a really relaxed, happy groove and a consciously loungy air that will have you smiling even if, as the case with me, you generally don’t care for songs of that description. In his famous song “Chiclete com Banana,” Jackson do Pandeiro satirically called for a fusion of American and Brazilian music he named “samba-rock.” He would definitely enjoy these unimagined results. Have yourself a “Tudo Bem” day…… John P. Rickert….~

Contrary to part of its title and for those of you who may not be so familiar with Brazilian music or Brazilian terminology of music, this is not a rock CD or in any way a fusion of samba and rock music. Instead it is a delightful collection of original, funk-soul-samba inspired songs with a dash of modern ingredients. Trio Mocoto is a wonderful, soulful group who performed with the great Jorge Ben in the 70’s and had a lot of success during that era when funk-soul-samba fusion music was at an alltime high. They were and still continue to be one of the best groups from that era and have had more staying power than other equally talented groups/artists from that era (like Banda Black Rio, Azymuth, Wilson Simonal, Tim Maia, etc.), whom many of them unfortunately died out with the passing of the 70’s and early 80’s. A wonderful CD to revive the career of a wonderful group! Every song is energetic, original and equally as good as the other, I highly recommend checking out this CD. You will not be disappointed…..by…. M Katayama…..~

A mocoto’ is a cut of meat, and apparently in carioca slang a few decades ago it was sometimes meant to describe a woman with shapely legs. This trio was Jorge Ben’s band for some of his best work, and now they reappear with one of the greatest party albums imaginable. With Jorge Ben-like ease, they swing through these loose and loopy numbers with tremendous instrumental prowess. Great imagination in the arrangements, with the cuica 'singing’ the melody of 'Aguas de Marco’ being the obvious example. This is what the 60’s would have sounded like with digital technology. This dinosaur band has come back to like in the very prime of life, apparently. (How often does that happen?) Simply put, every track makes you want to dance and this album does not disappoint anyone seeking an injection of funky soulful Brazilian rock. Swing it, baby…..by.. Eric C…..~

A new album after a hiatus of some 25 years?! 
Instead of leaving the battlefield of re-awakened demand for Brazilian beats (due to the lounge compilations) to the copycats, Trio Mocotó decided to deliver the original groove. 
As if no time passed, those three guys lay down an album full of infectious beats and melodies as if there was nothing to it. Those tight, jazzy, funky beats keep coming, this is just the right CD for a BBQ or after dinner, to get the digesting crowd on their hoofs. 
I just can’t understand why such a super group would remain unnoticed to the iniciated RYM community!…by….yofriend ….~

The Trio Mocotó is a group that shaped a style that would be known as samba-rock, resulting in the fusion of the two genres. The trio influenced many artists who were searching for some kind of fusion between Brazilian and American pop music, like Tim Maia and Jorge Ben, whom they backed in recordings and performances both in Brazil and internationally. 

The trio was formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub (São Paulo) by Fritz Escovão, Joãozinho Parahyba, and Nereu Gargalo, who were the regular backing musicians for the featured artists, such as Clementina de Jesus, Nelson Cavaquinho, Cartola, and other performers. The Jogral was one of the most important nightclubs of Brazil in that time, and international artists like Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson, and Earl Hines also performed there, accompanied by the Trio Mocotó. As Jorge Ben (later Jorge Ben Jor) used to sit in often, the trio became Ben’s backup band. The result was the sound that Ben was searching for, a kind of fusion between samba and rock. The trio accompanied Ben in virtually all the tracks on Ben’s album Jorge Ben (Philips, 1969). As Ben’s supporting band for the performance of “Charles Anjo 45” at the IV Festival Internacional da Canção, the trio had to choose a name, so Mocotó was adopted as a reference to a slang word for ladies’ legs. (The polemical and somewhat aggressive song was met with massive booing in the packed Maracanãzinho). “Eu Quero Mocotó,” another composition by Ben (dedicated to ladies’ legs, not to the trio), was also performed in the same festival by Erlon Chaves and Banda Veneno, with Ben and the trio as guests. 

During the early '70s, the trio was very busy. They hit the charts with the single “Coqueiro Verde” (Roberto Carlos/Erasmo Carlos) and soon departed to Cannes, France, where they accompanied Ben in his performance at MIDEM (which launched a European tour with the composer/musician). In Japan they all recorded a live album (unreleased at the time in Brazil). Upon their return, they accompanied Ben and Toquinho for the recording of “Que Maravilha” and departed once more for an international tour with Ben. Returning to Brazil, they were invited by Toquinho and Vinícius de Moraes to back them in some recordings as well as accompanying them (together with Marília Medalha) in the Encontro show, touring the country in the college circuit, and then through Mexico. 

Their first LP came in 1971, Muita Zorra! Ou São Coisas Que Glorificam a Sensibilidade Atual (Philips), followed by two others in 1973 (RGE) and 1975. With advent of the disco craze and the subsequent waning of interest in live music, the group ran out of work and dissolved. In 2000, after 24 years without performing together, they teamed up again to play in the Jô Soares TV show commemorating the group’s 30th anniversary. ~ Alvaro Neder….allmusic….~

“Trio Mocotó is a Brazilian band, originally formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub in São Paulo, and reformed in 2000. The group was influential in forming the musical style that became known as samba rock or samba soul. In 1969, they were backing Jorge Ben, being featured on seminal albums Força Bruta, Negro É Lindo and Tábua de Esmeralda. 

In 1971, they had a hit with the single "Coqueiro Verde” (written by Erasmo Carlos). Their return to the studios with Samba Rock in 2001 was followed by tours and live appearance in main music festivals in Europe and Japan, with renewed energy and public. The group received in 2001 the APCA (São Paulo Art Critics Association ) award for Best Group, and in 2006 Nereu’s album as solo artist “Samba Power” received again the APCA, this time with Best Album of the Year.“ wiki 

The band’s early material is definitely better suited to The Crypt as it more Samba Jazz (I’ll post a 1974 set with Dizzy Gillespie over there soon), this one is a whole different animal entirely! All three guys had remained very active during their 25 years apart and had absorbed all kinds of new sounds and rhythms including rock, soul and hip hop. It all combines in a wonderful, fun ride here. You will not be able to sit still for very long with this one coming out of your speakers!!!….~

Tracklist

Trio Mocoto - Voltei Amor 
Trio Mocoto - Tudo Bem 
Trio Mocoto - Pensando Nela 
Trio Mocoto - Adelita 
Trio Mocoto - Os Orixas 
Trio Mocoto - Aguas De Marco 
Trio Mocoto - Nao Sei Porque 
Trio Mocoto - Kriola 
Trio Mocoto - A Tonga Da Mironga Do Kabulete 
Trio Mocoto - Kibe Cru 
Trio Mocoto - Nereu Nereu 
Trio Mocoto - Cyrano Do Beijorac 
Trio Mocoto - Mocoto Beat 
Trio Mocoto - Fui 





watch….
Trio Mocotó ‎ “Trio Mocotó” 1973 Brazil Latin Funk, Samba Funk 

watch
Trio Mocotó “Muita Zorra” 1971 Brazil latin funk soul Samba Rock 

watch
Trio Mocotó ‎” Trio Mocotó" 1977 Brazil Latin Funk,Samba Soul 

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