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Friday, 25 May 2018

Trio Mocotó ‎ “Trio Mocotó” 1973 Brazil Latin Funk, Samba Funk


Trio Mocotó ‎ “Trio Mocotó” 1973 Brazil Latin Funk, Samba Funk one of the best Brazilian albums recommended…~
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https://open.spotify.com/album/0Go7lwU4ezAru4cp5glWzB


Perfect mix of dancefloor-oriented samba percussion, funky guitars and Brazilian pop with a soulful twist. Originally released on RGE Discos in 1973, it has remained unavailable on vinyl for a long time.
Here we have a band that is both authentically Brazilian, using Samba, Bossa Nova and MPB styles, and blending them with Funk and Soul and Cuban elements. All the elements the band employed to make their album Beleza! Beleza!! Beleza!!! so catchy, they’re here, more than thirty years earlier. The arrangements are great, discreet yet elaborate. 
The inclusion of Gotas de chuva na minha cuíca - Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head wasn’t necessary, though it’s meant ironically, it doesn’t fit in this context. As for the rest of the album, there are lots of highlights; try the fast and immensely danceable Desapareça and the singalong Palomares. 
DJs, wake up!……music emporium….~


The Trio Mocotó is a group that shaped a style that would be known as samba-rock, resulting in the fusion of the two genres. The trio influenced many artists who were searching for some kind of fusion between Brazilian and American pop music, like Tim Maia and Jorge Ben, whom they backed in recordings and performances both in Brazil and internationally. 

Jorge Ben [Criola] The trio was formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub (São Paulo) by Fritz Escovão, Joãozinho Parahyba, and Nereu Gargalo, who were the regular backing musicians for the featured artists, such as Clementina de Jesus, Nelson Cavaquinho, Cartola, and other performers. The Jogral was one of the most important nightclubs of Brazil in that time, and international artists like Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson, and Earl Hines also performed there, accompanied by the Trio Mocotó. As Jorge Ben (later Jorge Ben Jor) used to sit in often, the trio became Ben’s backup band. The result was the sound that Ben was searching for, a kind of fusion between samba and rock. The trio accompanied Ben in virtually all the tracks on Ben’s album Jorge Ben (Philips, 1969). As Ben’s supporting band for the performance of “Charles Anjo 45” at the IV Festival Internacional da Canção, the trio had to choose a name, so Mocotó was adopted as a reference to a slang word for ladies’ legs. (The polemical and somewhat aggressive song was met with massive booing in the packed Maracanãzinho). “Eu Quero Mocotó,” another composition by Ben (dedicated to ladies’ legs, not to the trio), was also performed in the same festival by Erlon Chaves and Banda Veneno, with Ben and the trio as guests. 
During the early ‘70s, the trio was very busy. They hit the charts with the single “Coqueiro Verde” (Roberto Carlos/Erasmo Carlos) and soon departed to Cannes, France, where they accompanied Ben in his performance at MIDEM (which launched a European tour with the composer/musician). In Japan they all recorded a live album (unreleased at the time in Brazil). Upon their return, they accompanied Ben and Toquinho for the recording of “Que Maravilha” and departed once more for an international tour with Ben. Returning to Brazil, they were invited by Toquinho and Vinícius de Moraes to back them in some recordings as well as accompanying them (together with Marília Medalha) in the Encontro show, touring the country in the college circuit, and then through Mexico. 

Their first LP came in 1971, Muita Zorra! Ou São Coisas Que Glorificam a Sensibilidade Atual (Philips), followed by two others in 1973 (RGE) and 1975. With advent of the disco craze and the subsequent waning of interest in live music, the group ran out of work and dissolved. In 2000, after 24 years without performing together, they teamed up again to play in the Jô Soares TV show commemorating the group’s 30th anniversary…. by Alvaro Neder….all music….~


Trio Mocotó are mostly known for being Jorge Ben’s backing band at the peak of his career, during the early 70s. They shaped what has been called samba rock sound, resulting in the fusion of Brazilian sounds and American pop-rock.After forming in Sao Paulo’s Jogral nightclub, where Fritz Escovão, Joãozinho Parahyba and Nereu Gargalo would work as regular backing musicians for the featured artists, Jorge Ben recruited them for his own band. They took part in the recording of Ben’s self-titled LP from 1969, “Força bruta” and “Negro é lindo” albums. Their first solo album, “Muita zorra! (…São coisas que glorificam a sensibilidade atual)”, came out in 1971 and hit the charts with the single ‘Coqueiro Verde’, opening a very busy period in their career.Their second, and self-titled, album was released by RGE in 1973 and is a perfect mix of dancefloor-oriented samba percussion, funky guitars and Brasilian pop with a soulful twist. The opening track, ‘Desapareça, vá, desapareça’, is a killer tune and the perfect introduction to the vibe of the entire album, mixing samba and funk like no others had done at the time. ‘Swinga Sambaby’ would also be an obvious choice for those into party tunes, making the album sparkle with this fierce combination of irresistible rhythms and deep vocals. Even the jazzy touch is here, just listen to ‘Palomares’ or ‘Tô Por Fora da Jogada’ and enjoy dreaming of the golden sand of the Brazilian beaches…….~


The Trio Mocotó is a group that shaped a style that would be known as samba-rock, resulting in the fusion of the two genres. The trio influenced many artists who were searching for some kind of fusion between Brazilian and American pop music, like Tim Maia and Jorge Ben, whom they backed in recordings and performances both in Brazil and internationally. 
The trio was formed in 1968 in the Jogral nightclub (São Paulo) by Fritz Escovão, Joãozinho Parahyba, and Nereu Gargalo, who were the regular backing musicians for the featured artists, such as Clementina de Jesus, Nelson Cavaquinho, Cartola, and other performers. The Jogral was one of the most important nightclubs of Brazil in that time, and international artists like Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson, and Earl Hines also performed there, accompanied by the Trio Mocotó. As Jorge Ben (later Jorge Ben Jor) used to sit in often, the trio became Ben’s backup band. The result was the sound that Ben was searching for, a kind of fusion between samba and rock. The trio accompanied Ben in virtually all the tracks on Ben’s album Jorge Ben (Philips, 1969). As Ben’s supporting band for the performance of “Charles Anjo 45” at the IV Festival Internacional da Canção, the trio had to choose a name, so Mocotó was adopted as a reference to a slang word for ladies’ legs. (The polemical and somewhat aggressive song was met with massive booing in the packed Maracanãzinho). “Eu Quero Mocotó,” another composition by Ben (dedicated to ladies’ legs, not to the trio), was also performed in the same festival by Erlon Chaves and Banda Veneno, with Ben and the trio as guests. 

During the early '70s, the trio was very busy. They hit the charts with the single “Coqueiro Verde” (Roberto Carlos/Erasmo Carlos) and soon departed to Cannes, France, where they accompanied Ben in his performance at MIDEM (which launched a European tour with the composer/musician). In Japan they all recorded a live album (unreleased at the time in Brazil). Upon their return, they accompanied Ben and Toquinho for the recording of “Que Maravilha” and departed once more for an international tour with Ben. Returning to Brazil, they were invited by Toquinho and Vinícius de Moraes to back them in some recordings as well as accompanying them (together with Marília Medalha) in the Encontro show, touring the country in the college circuit, and then through Mexico. 

Their first LP came in 1971, Muita Zorra! Ou São Coisas Que Glorificam a Sensibilidade Atual (Philips), followed by two others in 1973 (RGE) and 1975. With advent of the disco craze and the subsequent waning of interest in live music, the group ran out of work and dissolved. In 2000, after 24 years without performing together, they teamed up again to play in the Jô Soares TV show commemorating the group’s 30th anniversary……~



discography

http://www.slipcue.com/music/brazil/trio-mocoto_01.html






Tracklist 
Desapareça 2:35 
Nó Na Garganta 4:05 
Vem Cá 2:30 
Recordar 2:50 
Não Vá Embora 2:30 
Desculpe 2:10 
Maior É Deus 2:40 
Samba Da Preguiça 2:00 
Palomares 4:45 
Swinga Sambaby 1:40 
Tô Por Fora Da Jogada 2:05 
Gotas De Chuva Na Minha Cuica (Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head) 2:15 



watch

Trio Mocotó “Samba Rock"2001 CD Brazil Samba Rock,Latin Funk 
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2018/05/trio-mocoto-samba-rock2001-cd-brazil.html

watch
Trio Mocotó ‎” Trio Mocotó" 1977 Brazil Latin Funk,Samba Soul 
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2018/05/trio-mocoto-trio-mocoto-1977-brazil.html

watch
Trio Mocotó "Muita Zorra” 1971 Brazil latin funk soul Samba Rock 

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