Sunday, 6 May 2018

Tudor Lodge “ Tudor Lodge” 1971 UK Prog Folk


Tudor Lodge “ Tudor Lodge” 1971 mega rare Vertigo Press  UK Prog Folk
Tubor Lodge.“The Lady's Changing Home ” 1971 {HQ} with lyrics on google+
https://photos.app.goo.gl/rzX9s640k4zQCQSg1

full vk
full album on vimeo

https://vimeo.com/103047110

official website

http://www.tudorlodge.com/


An exquisite reissue on the Italian Akarma label, the eponymous debut album by Tudor Lodge taps into both the perpetual collectibility of the early-‘70s Vertigo label catalog and the mid-2000s’ growing fascination with British folk-prog of the same era. The trio of Lyndon Green, John Stannard, and Ann Steuart, backed by a heavyweight band of folk and classical legends (the redoubtable rhythm section of Danny Thompson and Terry Cox included), Tudor Lodge were unashamedly pastoral – their music is the sound of a summer’s day in centuries past, where “grey-backed squirrels run to safety,” (“Forest”), ladies “disappear into the sunset, shrouded in organdie and wine” (“Willow Tree”), and even bloody battlefields become a place for quiet contemplation (“Help Me Find Myself”). And, all the while, clarinets twinkle, violins sigh, and cellos call to one another across the verdant fields. Recorded in a mere two weeks in early 1971, Tudor Lodge is very much a child of its times – hopeful, gentle, and so delicately melodic that, even with harmonies hurtling like asteroids across “I See a Man,” there is a Spartan simplicity to the record that surely exacted a major toll on the latter-day likes of Belle & Sebastian – a comparison that the almost raunchy guitar and psych-soaked wah-wah of “The Lady’s Changing Home” only amplifies. In its original vinyl form, Tudor Lodge was released in a grandiose six-panel die-cut sleeve, decorated with the intricate penciled sketches of artist Phil Duffy. In common with Akarma’s other Vertigo reissues, this fabulous packaging has been restored in its entirety. Like the music, it’s breathtaking…..by Jo-Ann Greene…allmusic….~


The original album and single, issued on Vertigo Records in the “Spiral Years”, were recorded in Lansdowne Studios, Holland Park, London, engineered by Peter Gallen and produced by Terry Brown. Danny Thompson and Terry Cox from Pentangle featured on double bass and drums. Sonny Condell from Tir Na Nog played African drums on “Recollection.” Mike Morgan played electric guitar on “The Lady’s Changing Home.”….~




Surely there’s not another highly collectable album available at The Sound Machine!? Well, actually yes there is! It’s the gorgeous 1971 Vertigo ‘swirl’ album by Tudor Lodge and again it’s in fabulous condition. But who just who were Tudor Lodge? 
Interestingly Tudor Lodge were formed in Reading in 1968 by John Stannard and Roger Strevens who were more than familiar with the local folk scene at this time. Initially performing as a duo they could often be seen at The White Horse, however in 1969 Roger moved on to be replaced by Lyndon Green who had recently returned to England after sampling the delights of the happy hippy trail to Turkey. 
Within a year the new duo were joined by American singer and flautist Ann Steuart and as a trio they toured the English folk scene for a couple of more years before releasing their delightful self -titled album in 1971. In the same year they could be seen performing at the ever popular Cambridge Folk Festival as well as the legendary Weeley Festival near Clacton in Essex where the crowd reached a staggering 150,000. 
The album itself is simply superb with Ann’s stunning vocals and flute playing alongside the acoustic guitars and harmony vocals of Lyndon and John bringing the best from some beautifully crafted songwriting. Add to this accompaniment from seasoned musicians including Danny Thompson on bass, Tony Coe on clarinet and alto flute, Graham Lyons bass and Terry Cox on drums as well as some violins and cello and you have a classic piece of what we now call ‘acid folk’. Check out the brilliant Willow Tree as an example. 
In ’72 Ann left the group and was replaced for a while by Linda Peters who became better known through her work with husband Richard Thompson. Tudor Lodge then toured Holland but sadly on their return called it a day and the members went their separate ways. 
Various reformations have occurred since this period with the occasional album resulting and John is still performing in the Reading area with his current outfit John Cee Stannard and Blues Horizon and their CDs are also on sale at The Sound Machine…..by Mike Warth…..~


The LP has become one of several expensive Vertigo obscurities that divide people. Some consider it a folk classic, while others find it insipid. Contemporary reviewers had the same problem. 'In order to strengthen the impact of their music, a surplus of orchestration has been added,’ griped Melody Maker on August 21st 1971. 'More often than not this is superfluous. There is a lack of aggression and variation of mood within the basic framework of the music. If more of the album had relied on the guts of rock accompaniment, then it would have been improved.’ Disc & Music Echo were somewhat keener on September 4th, writing that 'Tudor Lodge have put up a good show for their first album, and come over as completely unpretentious. The trio have had a lot of experience in folk clubs, and it’s paid off for them… The entire album is well thought-out and presented.’ Sounds, however, was less convinced. 'I’m afraid the recording just doesn’t do justice to this fine trio,’ it carped on October 23rd. 'The arrangements are exteremly pretty, but whilst I’m in favour of some albums being deliberately cooked slightly under, producer Terry Brown seems to have gone too far, and in doing so has detracted from the impact of the Tudors.’ 
The upshot was that barely anyone bought it, causing a perfect copy to sell on eBay in October 2010 for over £2000…..~



As I was you-tubing the Akarma vinyl reprint label’s catalog my eye fell on this folky songwriters album from the obscure Tudor Lodge. When I finally unwrapped this beautiful animated record I was happy to find a great album with nothing but strong songs well performed and well arranged with the help of a variety of musicians (wind, strings, percussion). The recording quality (on my Akarma reprint) is sublime! Warm, soothing and very professional. I don’t think that an album like this would be added under the current progarchives restrictions, but it’s a great folk record that will be very hard to dislike for everyone interested in early seventies music. 

I quickly found that the women in my life also like this record, an effect other recent purchases like T2 and The Human Beast did not have. The special designed fold-out sleeve with fantasy drawings of the three band- members are also an eye-catcher. I myself like the relaxing atmospheres and the tenderness of it all. Some songs do have some harmonically interesting parts and especially the wind-instruments may remind me a bit of King Crimson’s 'I talk to the wind’ - but let’s not stretch it too much….by friso ….~


Although generally considered to be part of the progressive folk scene (and indeed it was originally released on the famed Vertigo label), the emphasis is very much on the folk side of the equation here, and fans of Fairport Convention and other pioneers of British folk rock would probably have just as much chance to enjoy this one as pursuers of folk-prog. The warm, evocative production in particular makes the album a pleasant and approachable listen, and the very occasional inclusion of more psychedelic or electric elements stops things getting samey; on top of that, the band manage to deal with the inclusion of a chamber orchestra on most of the tracks without allowing the orchestra to overpower them or make things too schmaltzy…by Warthur ….~


There is something very special about the british folk-boom of the 60’s and 70’s. Sure, the boom was not all british but came to be in parts all over the world. But for me it’s the british folk-scene that is most intriguing and brings me to think of green pastures, meadows, the past, love and death, hardship and amazing musicianship. I am a great fan of Pentangle, Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span (to name but a few, though well known bands). But there are also great albums from other constellations, lesser knownor with a lifespan considerably shorter, like Tudor Lodge. 
I’ve been slightly hesitant towards Tudor Lodge. From what I had heard it really wasn’t quite what I was looking for in british folk, being slightly too american for my taste. At least that was my conception. Now, in possession of the Repertoire papersleeve reissue, I find myself nodding in recognition of my fears but also acknowledging the fact that it was not so american as I’d thought. 

Surely there are american nods on here but not in a totally unattractive way, as on the Baby Whale album. The sounds of the british isles blend very well with the ever so slightly spiced americana, creating a very cohesive sound and record. I wish there would have been more of the traditionally sounding british prog folk but then again, it actually sounds great. 

The music on Tudor Lodge is very mellow, harmony drenched and dreamy. It sounds extremely professional and thought through. Considering the mere two weeks it took to record it I find myself baffled and in awe. I suppose the group must have been very tight, having played and rehearsed alot before entering the studio. 

The instrumentation on the album is amazing. All kinds of acoustic playing can be heard, only once or twice becoming electrified. I am amazed, really. What I had thought before seem now like totally untrue. The truth is that Tudor Lodge is a great album, full of the folk I adore. This is classic and really comparable to other stars of the same era, though sounding in a really personal fashion, not copying any of it’s peers in Pentangle, Fairport or whoever. 

In short: Tudor Lodge delivers an album of amazing, delicate, gentle folk in a completely individual fashion. It’s a shame (or is it a blessing?) they did not make another album at the time. On the other hand the impact seem so much greater now, the legacy more intriguing and mysterious. Although the album may be a footnote in the history of music it remains a vibrant footnote. If you’re into this kind of stuff I really recommend you get hold of a copy. Like, now? Yes. Right now…..by GruvanDahlman ……~


Once again Esoteric continue to mine the seams of those long lost treasures of yesteryear, presenting forgotten gems at affordable prices. Original LP copies of this 1971 album were known to fetch silly amounts of money; a combination of the sought after Vertigo `spiral’ label, and the genuinely excellent contents within. 
Ostensibly an acoustic folk trio, they are augmented by the Pentangle rhythm section of Danny Thompson and Terry Cox among many other contributors, which gives a huge clue as to the level of musical accomplishment on show here. There are inevitable comparisons with Pentangle, but the trio of Lyndon Green, Ann Steuart and John Stannard are individual enough to make this a wonderful and beautifully recorded album full of truly memorable self-penned tunes and infused with that uniquely English rustic sound. 

Vocal duties are equally shared but Ann Steuart in particular, has a crystal clear voice which is well up there with her peers, and on the opening track `It All Comes Back To Me’ it shines out amongst chiming acoustic guitars, double bass and flute. `Two Steps Back’ is also a particularly fine example of a beautifully arranged timeless melody which delights the ears and recalls sweeter, simpler times. The album maintains a consistency, the guitar arrangements are beautiful and the trio is augmented by some 12 guest musicians adding their brush strokes along the way. This was seemingly an album made with much care and attention, although we are told the studio time only totalled two weeks… 

It is somewhat of a mystery that this album did not find a wider audience in it’s own lifetime. A wonderful discovery which sounds fresh and assured and easily worth five stars….by beebfader…..~


I found a Repertoire’s re-issue vinyl of this album when I searched for psych folk albums with lady singers at my youth. I was mostly stunned by the promises of beautiful psychedelic drawings of the album sleeve, and these expectations were quite well met on both musical and aesthetic levels too, though some maturing was needed from my own part. 
The medieval elements are mostly focused to instrumental classic guitar song “Madeline”, and to the chamber music sequences of wonderful “Willow Tree”, which has also fine psychedelic load in the freely weaving starting part. There are also some anti-war 60’s folk songs resembling Peter, Paul & Mary like “I See A Man”, and more casual folk charmers like “Two Steps Back”. A small chamber orchestra is participating on majority of the tracks, and this brings lots of more to listen, but also deepen some slightly banal “Disney emphasizing” of the music. Well, Ann Steuart’s voice is very lovely, and his hippie boyfriends do decent support with harmonies and guitars. “Lady’s Changing Home” is the solitary folk rock number here with amplified instruments, and “Forest” is also a song worth to mention, painting a light and relaxing scenario of lovely day among the glades. 

This album has been produced quite well, so there are no amateurish playing nor arrangements found here, and the sound quality of the recording is excellent. Though there were some characteristics in few compositions which first felt bit unpleasant to me, maybe it is fun to learn adopt all sweet and positive things as favorable experiences. However there are many beautiful scenarios on this album, and I can’t emphasize too much to get it as a vinyl with wonderful opening gatefold artwork….by Eetu Pellonpaa ….~


Yet another folk-rock group from the early 70'ss which made a superb album, actually released on the famous Vertigo â??swirlâ? label with a stunning fold-out artwork, which under its original and mint state will fetch almost a four figure price. Actually I can only tell you that unless you plan to frame the artwork and hang it on your wall, this price is really overdone, especially now that this has been released under three (four with the vinyl re-issues) different forms: a Repertoire release in the early 90â??s, a rather expensive Japanese mini-Lp release (but the fabrication is outstanding) and again another Repertoire release but this time in a mini-Lp format (not as outstanding but at half the price of the Japan version). If I must give you an advice (should you choose to investigate this beautiful and pastoral folk rock), I would encourage you to take the third choice. 
However, enjoyable this group might be, it is of a limited interest for the proghead looking for intricate music. Despite its historic Tudor-allusion in its name, one cannot say that the music is much different than Fairport Convention or Amazing Blondel, do not look at ancient music influences here, although here and there, there are hints of it. Often compared (and sometimes mixed-up with) to Trader Horne, the music does bear resemblance also to Fotheringay, 

Full of hippy ideals, this singing guitar trio (Ann Steuart also plays piano and flute) gets some help from other horn musicians and a string section and most of all, the participation of giant double-bass master Danny Thompson (of Pentangle, John Martyn and Tim Buckley fame) even if he stays more discreet (not mixed loud enough) on this album than in others. The music stays completely acoustic (except for the odd electric guitar on one superb track - The Lady Is Changing Home), and sometimes also instrumental (Madeline) displaying a certain kind of virtuosity that every proghead will love. 
If you have enjoyed the afore-mentioned groups in this review, no doubt you will appreciate this record and therefore only the tough choice I presented you with in the first paragraph, but even then I help you out, you lucky SOB ;-) Run for it!!!!….. by Sean Trane ….~


Tudor Lodge was originally formed in 1968, featuring John Stannard and Roger Strevens. The group started playing at the White Horse in Reading, England and later made appearances at other clubs on the folk circuit. In 1969 Lyndon Green replaced Roger. Lyndon had just returned to England after treading the hippy trail to Turkey and within a year they were joined by American singer and flautist, Ann Steuart. Tudor Lodge then toured the English folk circuit for over two years, teaming up with manager Karl Blore in March 1970, and releasing their first album in 1971: “Tudor Lodge” (Vertigo 6360043). Later that year, the group appeared at the prestigious Cambridge Folk Festival and also at Weeley Festival in Essex. 
Annie left the group in 1972 and was briefly replaced by Linda Peters, who became better known through her work with husband Richard Thompson. That year saw Tudor Lodge touring Holland where they featured on Dutch Radio after which the group disbanded with their various careers diverging. 
John, Lyndon and Annie did get back together in 1980 but Annie left soon to live in New Hampshire. Lynne Whiteland replaced her, and in 1988 Lyndon retired from performing. He is currently living and working in Japan. Since then Tudor Lodge has been a duo presenting their own brand of music: New and Old, Original and some well known songs — Humour, Harmony and a touch of Nostalgia. 
In September 1999, Tudor Lodge went to Japan and played two very successful gigs in Tokyo. Lynne and John were joined on stage by Lyndon and two excellent Japanese musicians, Bice (keyboard and vocals) and Shimizu Hirotaka (bass). The group performed songs from all four albums, to the delight of their many Japanese fans. The popularity of Tudor Lodge is set to continue: their CD “Runaway” was released on May 24, 2003, and their fifth studio CD “Unconditional” was released in September 2006. 
May 2013 saw the release of Tudor Lodge’s 6th full studio album, “Stay”, featuring 14 new songs by Lynne and John. This album was three years in the making and Lynne and John are thrilled with the result. There is a fuller, more complete band sound throughout and the additional musicians, including orchestrations on three tracks, makes it even more special. The feedback so far has been terrific, with listeners describing the album as “… absolutely the best work you’ve ever done.” 
The first video below is one of the outstanding tracks from the “Stay” album: “Emily’s Song.” 
Tudor Lodge played at the 14th Annual Wittenham Free Charity Music Festival on Saturday 29th June 2013. It was a great success having followed closely behind the most excellent Boars Bridge Festival. 
On October 19th 2013, Tudor Lodge played at Milk, a bar in Reading, as part of Oxjam – Reading Takeover, a charity event for Oxfam. 
John and Lynne recorded an interview in which they talked about the history of the group and their reminiscences of their meeting and getting together.
The latest Tudor Lodge studio album, “SPACES,” was released in June 25th 2016. …..~


The sole album by this trio of singer/guitarists seems to me to be more mainstream than folk, though that’s not a criticism. All but one of the songs are self-penned. There are no dark corners in Tudor Lodge’s world. Though some of the lyrics are sad, this is a light, airy, feelgood vibe album that doesn’t always have a lot to say. I’m thinking particularly of 'Forest’ which is little more than a description of woodland. The band’s strongest point is American Ann Steuart, who not only adds piano and flute, but has a voice of shimmering beauty. The album is bostered by several other musicians and there’s a generous dose of woodwind across the tracks. Perhaps the one faux pas is the male vocal on 'Recollections’ which I imagine is that of the writer, Lyndon Green. He makes up for it though on the brilliant acoustic instrumental, 'Madeleine.’ Well worth investigating….by….D. J. H. Thorn ….~



Formed in 1968 and named after their local Berkshire pub (the Tudor Lodge in Reading), guitarists John Stannard and extrovert Roger Stevens almost immediately disbanded, leaving the former to fulfil booking commitments. With fellow singer-songwriter, Australian-born Lyndon Green on board, the duo played a residence at the Windsor folk club early ‘69. By that summer, the pair had found a third member, American Ann Steuart, who’d been studying to become an opera singer, while also on a 2-year music course at college. In 1970, and with the aid of manager Karl Blore, the trio inked a deal with Phillips fledgling rock offshoot Vertigo (then stamping ground for heavies, BLACK SABBATH and URIAH HEEP). Premiering their new songs supporting prog rockers KING CRIMSON (at The Marquee in early ‘71), the twee triumvirate of TUDOR LODGE recorded their eponymous studio in only a fortnight. 
TUDOR LODGE (1971) {*7}, was well received, although poor sales limited its wider appeal – its subsequent value rose to over £120. Featuring additional musicians, including PENTANGLE’s rhythm section of DANNY THOMPSON and Terry Cox, bassoon-player Graham Lyons and jazz muso Tony Coe, the album has since become a staple of every Brit-prog-folk aficionado. Light and airy, over half the songs stemmed from Stannard, the most gracious of them being breezy opener `It All Comes Back To Me’, The MAMAS AND THE PAPAS/LOVIN’ SPOONFUL-like `Would You Believe?’ and the PETER, PAUL & MARY-esque `Help Me Find Myself’. Steuart, herself, was responsible for `Two Steps Back’ (and the darkly-dark group composition `Willow Tree’), while Green’s contributions comprised of `Recollections’ (featuring TIR NA NOG’s Sonny Condell on African drums), `Forest’, baroque instrumental picker `Madeline’, and flop co-penned 45 `The Lady’s Changing Home’. The only cover to surface from the dainty dozen was a cover of RALPH McTELL’s `Kew Gardens’, another strictly for the PP&M purists. 
On the back of two high-profile slots at the Cambridge Folk Festival and on stage at 5 a.m. at Clacton’s Wheeley Fest, the pastoral trio supported the likes of FAIRPORT CONVENTION, STEELEYE SPAN and GENESIS, but all was not well with homesick Steuart; she upped sticks and returned to the USA, while replacement Linda Peters (soon to be wife of RICHARD THOMPSON) depped for a short stint in early ‘72. In 1981, John, Lyndon and Ann reunited for a one-off gig, while unknown singer Lynne Whiteland joined old retainer John in an all-new TUDOR LODGE duo. 
Their long-awaited return was complete via DREAM (2000) {*5}; Whiteland was now responsible for more than half the songs, while 2003’s RUNAWAY {*5} she was afforded more with Stannard on only two; latter-day sets comprised UNCONDITIONAL (2006) {*5} and STAY (2013) {*5}. Their heyday over, TUDOR LODGE will be remembered for their melody driven debut, with its numerous re-issues from all around the globe…..~







Credits 
Bass – Danny Thompson 
Bassoon, Clarinet – Graham Lyons 
Cello – Suzanne Perreault 
Drums – Terry Cox 
Drums [African] – Sonny* 
Electric Guitar – Mike Morgan (4) 
Flute [Alto], Clarinet – Tony Coe 
Horn – Douglas Moore (3) 
Oboe, Cor Anglais – G. Wareham 
Viola – Fred Buxton 
Violin [1st] – Sergei Bezkorvany 
Violin [2nd] – David Marcou 
Vocals [Singer], Guitar – John Stannard (2), Lyndon Green 
Vocals [Singer], Guitar, Piano, Flute – Ann Steuart










Tracklist 
A1 It All Comes Back To Me
A2 Would You Believe?
A3 Recollection
A4 Two Steps Back
A5 Help Me Find Myself
A6 Nobody’s Listening
B1 Willow Tree
B2 Forest
B3 I See A Man
B4 The Lady’s Changing Home
B5 Madeline
B6 Kew Gardens 

Signing our contract with Vertigo Records









Discography
1971 LP: “Tudor Lodge” (self-titled) — UK/Vertigo 
1971 Single: “The Lady’s Changing Home” b/w “The Good Times We Had” — UK/Vertigo 
1997 CD: “Let’s Talk” — UK/Cast Iron Recordings 
1998 CD: “It All Comes Back” — US/Scenescof 
1999 CD: “Dream” — UK/Cast Iron Recordings 
2003 CD: “Runaway” — Japan/Belle Antique 
2006 CD: “Avalon” — UK/Cast Iron Recordings 
2006 CD: “Unconditional” — UK/Cast Iron Recordings 
2013 CD: “Stay” — UK/Cast Iron Recordings 



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