Friday, 4 May 2018

White Witch “White Witch” 1972 + “A Spiritual Greeting ” 1974 US Heavy Glam Rock


White Witch “White Witch” 1972 + “A Spiritual Greeting ” 1974 US  Heavy Glam Rock 
White Witch “Illusion"1972 on dailymotion
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x25n4v9

full two albums on google+

https://goo.gl/photos/PUaJWTdorwVka6KY6



Formed in Florida by Buddy Richardson, a veteran of the Tampa scene (Outsiders, Soul Trippers and Noah’s Ark), White Witch played a mix of Southern heavy rock and hard/glam rock, with painted faces, powerful vocals and some strange lyrics. 
GREAT LP! How many bands do a concept LP on their first release? The layered vocals of Ronn Goedert are brilliant. He does go a bit camp with his high wailing voice, (Which I like!) but that same voice drops down & lays out some brilliant Beatle-esque vocals. Buddy Richardson bows his guitar & Pendergrass wraps that space moog around all of it. It’s pre-glam space rock & it’s on a southern rock label! 
White Witch formed in 1971 in Tampa. The band originally featured lead singer Ronald "Ronn” (or “Ron”) Goedert, guitarist Charles “Buddy” Richardson, keyboardist Hardin “Buddy” Pendergrass, drummer Robert “Bobby” Shea and bassist Loyall “Beau” Fisher. Several of the band members had belonged to a popular late-60s Tampa-area band called The Tropics. 
After touring small venues around the southeast for almost a year, White Witch signed with Capricorn Records, a label that included outfits such as the Allman Brothers Band and the Marshall Tucker Band. Though somewhat uneasy about being the only non-southern rock performers signed to the label, the members agreed to the contract without a manager or any legal representation  and quickly recorded their self-titled debut album in Capricorn’s Macon, Georgia studios. The band toured extensively to support the record, opening for established acts like Alice Cooper, Grand Funk Railroad, Billy Preston, and others. 
Fisher left the group sometime after the first album and was replaced by Rabbi Barbee, who left before the group went back in into the studio in 1974. Bassist Charlie Souza and drummer Bill Peterson also joined the band before the second album. 
Due to displeasure with their record label’s lack of promotion and its interference in the band’s recording sessions, Buddy Richardson left the group immediately after the second album (A Spiritual Greeting) was completed.[4] He was replaced by guitarist George Brawley, who had spent the previous year as a session guitarist in Los Angeles after leaving the southern rock group Brother from Columbia, SC. Drummer Bobby Shea stayed with the group as percussionist and back-up singer. 
White Witch did a bit more touring and recorded four tracks on demo, but broke up in the late 1970s before a third album was recorded. After White Witch, Goedert made some solo recordings, Pendergrass wrote commercial jingles and opened a recording studio, and Richardson played in other bands (“Revolver”). 
Some of the original group members began planning a reunion in the late 1990s which became impossible when lead singer Ron Goedert died of cancer on July 16, 2000. Pendergrass also became a victim of cancer on March 16, 2003…~ 




White Witch ‎ “White Witch” 1972

It seems that White Witch’s second album, A Spiritual Greeting, is seen by most people as their most progressive. Which really confuses me. 
Now don’t get me wrong, both WW albums are a mix bag of stuff. Ranging from spaced out heavy prog to psychedelic pop. BUT when it comes to prog rock, and which album is more consistently prog, then this album is what you’re looking for. 
The album opens up with Parabrahm Greeting/ Dwellers Of The Threshold, which is a great heavy prog/space rock intro with soaring vocals, great keyboard and guitar effects. The song then starts picking up and turns into a heavy prog wonder. Awesome. The song then segues into Help Me Lord. 
Help Me Lord is an organ led prog number. Great vocals and keyboards throughout. 
Don’t Close You Mind is perhaps their most progressive song. A lot of synthesizer use in this one. As usual great vocal harmonies thanks to Ronn Goedert. There’s some nice added touches of the wah-wah pedal. About midway through there is a brief bass and acoustic guitar part which quickly changes to a great guitar and keyboard jam. A truly great song throughout. 
Your the One is where WW starts to turn out their wonderful prog with pop sensibilities. Another wah-wah and synthesizer led beauty which segues into Sleepwalk. 
Sleepwalk is just one of their most beautiful songs. This song is led by synthesizers with some nice acoustic guitar playing along, then near the end Buddy Richardson does a brief jazz guitar solo and breaks out a searing guitar solo. 
Home Grown Girl is a blues/boogie number, which I could do without, but is still a great song. Singer Ronn Goedert has a rougher style on this song, as apposed to a more melodic and mellow style on most of WW’s material. 
And I’m Leaving is another catchy song. Supposedly this was a minor hit for them in the US in 1972, barely missing the top 40. 
Illusion is another highlight of this album. One of their heavier songs with Ronn Goedert giving his performance of a life time. As apposed to the rest of the album, this song is mainly guitar led. Keyboard wise there are organ and synthesizers playing along with the main guitar riff. Absolutely amazing song. 
The album takes a huge turn with It’s So Nice to be Stoned. As you can guess this is a stoner’s anthem, its a wonder that its not more well known. 
The album then closes with Have You Ever Thought of Changing?/Jackson Slade and The Gift which follows suite with the rest of the album. 
This album is White Witch at their best, absolutely amazing. 4 Stars….by AmericanProgster…..~

I’ve always wondered how a Tampa, Florida-based, prototype glam/hair band like this came to be signed by Phil Walden’s Southern-rock oriented Capricorn Records. These guys would seem to have had about as much in common with The Allman Brothers, or Marshall Tucker as T. Rex. 
Having previously played in Noah’s Ark, The Outsiders and The Soul Trippers, lead guitarist Buddy Richardson pulled White Witch together in the early 1970s. A series of auditions saw the band gel around the talents of Richardson, bassist Beau Fisher, singer Ronn Goedert, keyboardist Buddy Pendergrass and drummer Bobby Shea. A steady stream of tours attracted a small cult following and the attraction of Capricorn Records which signed the band even though they lacked any type of management agreement. 
As long as you’re not expecting to hear Allman Brothers-styled jams, musically 1972’s cleverly-titled “White Witch” isn’t half bad. With Goedert and Pendergrass responsible for the majority of material, the set’s quite diverse, touching on a wide array of genres, including progressive (the weird opener “Parabraham Greeting/Dwellers of the Threshold”), Wet Willie-styled blue-eyed soul (“Help Me Lord”), conventional rock (“Illusion”) and even English-styled pop rock (“And I’m Leaving”). Along with the eye shadow, that very diversity is also one of the band’s biggest problems. You simply can’t tell what these guys are about. They try to do a little bit of everything and in the end don’t end up particularly impressive at anything…..Bad Cat….~

“Just as the moon reflects the light of the sun, so the mind reflects the light of the heart. There’s a being within the depth of the soul, latent, sleeping…Arise…Arise!” Parabrahm Greeting by White Witch 
Ever wondered what Abbey Road-era Beatles would’ve sounded like playing The Move’s “Brontosaurus”, sped up to 45rpm? Or, what the Sensational Alex Harvey Band would’ve been like had they been Floridian glam-rockers on America’s best-known Southern Rock label? Or how Santana’s first Hammond-loving organist would’ve sounded like had he been kidnapped by a band of glam-rocking occultists who forced him to use an analogue synthesiser, only for him to eventually empathise with his captors in a Patty Hearst-like manner? Or how America’s ‘occult’ ‘rockers’ ‘Coven’ would’ve sounded like had they had talent and integrity and been on Capricorn instead of Buddha? 
No? Well never mind, because White Witch did in the early 70s, spreading the resultant endeavour like thick glam-jam over 2 LPs on Capricorn records. Ah, Capricorn Records! Amongst the many Allman Brothers records there lurked occasional beauties – indeed, even amongst their own corpus: (“Eat a Peach” and its immense epic of mercurial chromium guitars and muscular fluid bass, “Mountain Jam”). Bands such as Captain Beyond and this little known occult offering from hard-glam-progressive act, White Witch made for rock solid debuts. 
Apparently, one of White Witch’s main objectives was to counter a lot of the ‘negative’ energy brought into rock by Black Sabbath. I’m sceptical. To hear the first track you’d think the opposite was true. In any case, these seers were surely Sabbath fans to a man – but right alongside Altamont-era Stones, SAHB, Peter Banks’ Flash, The Who, and countless other rockers still flying freak flags high in 1972 – oh yeah…and possibly Manfred Mann’s Earth Band! There’s mucho moog my friends. 
Whatever the Sabbath connections, White Witch obviously chose the depths of hell to begin their crusade! “Parabrahm Greeting” begins as a hugely gluttonous moog demon is summoned via arcane filters out of the fires as the guitarist’s Kenneth Anger-era Jimmy P guitar laps all around it, sinuous flickering flames of alchemical Gibson Les Paul. Monolithic Ur-vocalist, Ronn Goedert (who in the space of this one LP will adopt the styles of Mick Jagger, Alex Harvey, Paul McCartney by way of Buck Dharma, Ian Gillan, Arthur Brown, and even Axl Rose whilst never falling hostage to any of them) spews forth some mystical poetry, as the whole crazy scenario erupts into a first-track-of-a-Moody-Blues-psychotic-studio-enhanced-episode, ushered into infinity as the track leads into the fabulously-named “Dwellers on the Threshold.” 
Stern guitars and a chromatic two chord see-sawing piano erupt amidst swirling mists of organ and Promethean guitar, rising and rising until it eventually spills over into thee most huge glam swagger riff, yet more ominous guitar, rolling drums and again the gallop or organ and guitar return. “Help me Lord” follows a as the vocalist stretches his Gillan larynx over Hair – The Musical backing singers chanting said title to a funky syncopated riff and resonant moog filters through the melody like grease on a Harley. 

“Don’t Close Your Mind” is a psych-progressive rocker of epic proportions: A sort of industrial strength Mott-the-Hoople on steroids jaunt that could easily have come off the 1st Flash LP. Huge rolling chord structures and sleazy glam descends turn up a rolling bass riff and vamped piano – sounds like an American Canterbury band – music perfectly formed for driving around corner bends in the road. An organ solo follows over clipped bass and still the harmonised vocals return: Don’t Close Your Mind! 

“Your The One” is a bright breezy late psychedelic Abbey Road-era McCartney type track replete with three part harmonies straight from “Because” and brief, ringing Hackett-Rutherford 12 strings. Trespass with balls! The versatility of the vocalist really comes to the fore here. Has such a pleasing grain to his vocals. Rolling glass Rhodes feeds out on a bed of barely there vocals into “Sleepwalk” – this chord structure reminds me of another song that I just can’t pin down. Parachute-era Pretty Things, comes to mind. Mid-song is dissolves into one of those great jazzy acoustic struts over which a glassy keyboard solo, then a jazzy guitar, then organ, then a distorted guitar all tale turns to solo before again changing pace as congas and more keyboard fight it out for whose going to have last say. A ghostly reprise of the track is the last thing that’s heard. The whole LP is awash to its core with early seventies-ness – Bowie, Purple, Pretty Things, Flash, Mott, Captain Beyond, Dust, Sabbath. 

A walloping drum beat opens Side Two with “Home grown Girl” a classic bar room boogie with lyrics such as “Your awful young to be a whore!” I think we can pretty much leave that there! 

“And I’m Leaving” is another heavy ballad, with SF Sorrow-era backing vocal sighs and swoons. Bluesy piano liven the track up for the chorus, until a very polished sounding Moog solo swoops all over the track. 

“Illusion” is a Fireball-style Purple romp through foxy-sounding wacka-wacka guitar and staccato riffage, as keyboardist (Jon) Lords it over the track in style. What startles is just how Axl the vocal sounds – more thundering rhythm section, here beefed up by a gloriously gluttinous moog that snakes along with the bass, before spaced out keyboard is splashed all over the track Pollock style – the singer grumbling all the while like a disconcerted space-tramp. These cats ain’t nearly finished as the track breaks down into low, low left hand distorto-organ and creepy right hand flourishes, speeding up like a bastard in thee most Arthur Brown/Kingdom come style. A blasting guitar solo, a halt, and the riff is fired off again, as if from a gun. 
“It’s So Nice to be Stoned” sort of speaks for itself. Amidst rambling moog lead and rag-time Rainy Day Woman/Don’t Bogart that Joint/Something Happened to me Yesterday accompaniment. Sample Lyric: “Guns and tanks and riot gas can’t stop you from smoking grass.” 
More space-rock echoed guitar introduces “Have You Ever Thought of Changing/Jackson Slade is another brash, chest beating riff, off set by a touching, vulnerable chorus. Until another very Beatles-like melody ushers in another great poised Ronson-to-the Max guitar squirm. 
A massive scream ushers in thee most doom laden Sabbath-ian riff, like a vortex of gushing wind blowing around bushels of analogue synthesiser melody. “The Gift” is a semi-spoken prayer to the gods of rock. Unabashed, heathen, visceral, primal! This is the sound of White Witch. … by aether…Head Heritage….~

White Witch, a prototype hair-metal band from Florida, also verges on Deep Purple parody as vocalist Ronn Goedert shrieks like Gillan and Buddy Pendergrass commands the keys like Jon Lord. The selections here veer abruptly from the genteel, “flower people” era-Spinal Tap-sound of the seven minute, “Don’t Close Your Mind,” to the shrill, heavier metal of “Help Me Lord,” and the Southern boogie of “Home Grown Girl.” The opening salvo, with the incredible title, “Parabrahm Greeting/Dwellers of the Threshold,” sounds a little like the music at Disneyland’s haunted house….by Denise Sullivan….~

Having previously played in Noah’s Ark, The Outsiders and The Soul Trippers, lead guitarist Buddy Richardson pulled White Witch together in the early 1970s. A series of auditions saw the band gel around the talents of Richardson, bassist Beau Fisher, singer Ronn Goedert, keyboardist Buddy Pendergrass and drummer Bobby Shea. A steady stream of tours attracted a small cult following and the attraction of Capricorn Records which signed the band even though they lacked any type of management agreement. 

Bass player Charlie Souza and keyboard player Buddy Pendergrass were both veterans of The Fabulous Tropics, a band that scored an American number 1 with ‘Take The Time’. Souza had also performed as part of the Gregg Allman band on his 'Laid Back’ album, Florida’s Bacchus and With Cactus. White Witch also inducted drummer Bill Peterson, another ex-Bacchus man, for 1973’s 'Spiritual Greetings’. 
Vocalist Ron Goedert later cut a solo album. Souza later joined Tom Petty, Galeforce and Fortress. He has also been a member of Sly And The Family Stone and worked with ex-Santana man Leon Patillo. 
Souza and Pendergrass reactivated The Fabulous Tropics in 1999. Ron Goedert passed away on 16th July 2000…..~

Beau Fisher (drums, bass, vocals) 
Ronn Goedert (vocals, percussion) 
Buddy Pendergrass (keyboards, backing vocals) 
Bill Peterson (percussion) 
Buddy Richardson (lead guitar) 
Bobby Shea (drums, percussion, backing vocals) 
Charlie Souza (bass, percussion)

Tracklist 
Parabrahm Greeting / Dwellers Of The Threshold 3:13 
Help Me Lord 3:09 
Don’t Close Your Mind 7:00 
You’re The One 3:15 
Sleepwalk 4:27 
Home Grown Girl 3:05 
And I’m Leaving 2:58 
Illusion 5:11 
It’s So Nice To Be Stoned 3:38 
Have You Ever Thought Of Changing 3:30 
Jackson Slade 1:45 
The Gift 1:45 







White Witch ‎ “A Spiritual Greeting"1974

Despite the Top 40 dominance of singer/songwriters and mellow sounds like the Carpenters, hard rock bands sold millions of albums during the early- to mid-'70s. Alice Cooper had a string of improbable hits with their cartoon perversity and gory theatricality, while Grand Funk Railroad rode their stripped-down "power trio” format to massive success. And Black Sabbath was producing their most influential records, the ones that would inspire countless metal bands to emulate their sound and demonic affectations. Whitewitch may have been as good as any hard rock band of their day – and was certainly better than many – but, where Ozzy and company capitalized on an implied link to Satanism, White Witch worked the other side of the philosophical street, suggesting some vague association with “white” (good) magic. The lack of white magic-influenced bands in subsequent years indicates which approach was more successful and appealing to audiences. It couldn’t have helped that they were on Capricorn Records, the label that was home to the Allman Brothers and many Southern rock bands they influenced. (Reportedly, unsold White Witch albums were melted down to press Dickey Betts’ solo records.) Regardless of their obscurity, White Witch was versatile, often surprising, and always listenable. On their second (and best, and final) album, they integrating progressive, glam, and psychedelic elements into something of a hard rock sampler. Lead singer Ron Goedert (d. 2000) was a vocal chameleon, and the band was equally adept at playing heavy and with finesse. The addictive “Showdown” sounds like a gutsier version of Supertramp or a poppier Deep Purple, and trippy tracks, “Crystallize and Realize” and “Class of 2000” could almost pass for lightweight early Genesis. “Walk On,” the album’s best song, is a lilting stroll that would stand out on any of the Kinks’ '70s concept albums. While the group’s philosophy is never exactly clear, lyrics referencing the Book of Revelations and Jean Harlow (in a single song) make for interesting listening. And whether sounding like a leather-lunged Brit screamer or a ringer for Ray Davies, Goedert delivers even when the songwriting doesn’t. Although A Spiritual Greeting was, in fact, the band’s farewell, it’s a satisfying slice of vintage hard rock….by James A. Gardner …allmusic….~

Some 30 years ago I found both the vinylalbums of White Witch, from which seemingly no one had ever heard, in a recordshop in Amsterdam and more out of curiosity I bought them. But unknown to the masses doesn’t also mean bad, on the contrary I came to like them very much. It is clearly seventies rock towards pop, with a high pitched singer, but the songs are very good, all of them strong and first class (self written) melodies, finally crafted by a well to do band, musically spoken, that is. Both albums are equal in material and performance. There are acoustic ballads, hardrock songs and even progressive rock (think for instance Deep Purple Mark I and II or Uriah Heep in the David Byron area), all cleverly played. For a long time they were hard to find on CD. Why would a recordcompany release them anyway, the band is long gone and forgotten, they didn’t succeed in gaining the heights they surely deserved. I am glad with both CD’s out now (the soundquality is flawless, crystal clear) and enjoying this music tremendously. Strongly recommended….by… J. Talsma….~

This music is so progressive, diverse, well-composed, and flawlessly executed that you will not believe it. Very catchy melodies, very heavy rhythms, very innovative sounds (for the 70’s), great musicianship, it has it all. The compositions are not the kind that just take a couple of chord progressions and repeat them endlessly. Intead, they take you on a ride that doesn’t often repeat itself. I have always considered it a major mystery that this group is not more well-known. I have and treasure the original albums, and wanted the music on CD so much that I carefully recorded them and transferred it to CD. Now that the real CDs are out, I will buy them both just to support whoever had the brilliance and good taste to release them….by….T. Thompson…~

The period of 1972-1975 was a really weird time for American popular culture, and of course that included music. Progressive music, such as we had managed to generate on this side of the pond, was largely in decline in favor of Southern boogie bands, dance music and the dulcet, silky smooth tones of the likes of Barry Manilow, Hall & Oates, the Carpenters and whatever Steve Miller had turned into. 
Fundamentalist Christians were hard at work saving their children from certain destruction and a fast- track to hell by salaciously burning every ‘heathen rock’ album or 8-track they could lay their hands on. I personally witnessed everything from Black Sabbath to Rod Stewart go up in smoke in the parking lot of my parents’ church during Sunday evening ‘sin roasts’. Collectors today can probably thank those lunatics for single-handedly helping ensure the scarcity of a lot of original vinyl from those days. 

Out of the deep South (and especially Florida), Southern boogie was thriving on the heels of the megalithic Lynyrd Skynyrd juggernaut. Spin-off and clone bands like .38 Special, Molly Hatchet, Rossington-Collins, the Outlaws and Blackfoot were filling stadiums and the airwaves with varying degrees of success. On the other side of the musical spectrum acts like KISS, Alice Cooper, the Stooges and Suzi Quatro were mixing stage antics with simple, heavy rhythms to popularize an American version of glam rock. Disco and punk were yet to invade the landscape in any appreciable way (although those days weren’t far away). 

In the religious vein the Jesus Freak movement had pretty much died along with the flower-power era, with groups like Water Into Wine Band, Children of the Day and Silmaril giving way to the more contemporary and commercial sounds of Andraé Crouch, Amy Grant and Petra. There were still a few Christian-leaning groups like Kansas and Ambrosia who managed straddle the line between progressive and religious music, but for the most part it was really a time to choose sides for American bands who wanted to attract one audience without alienating the other. Into this environment strode White Witch toward the middle part of the decade. 

White Witch were either ahead of their time, incredibly naïve, or maybe a little of both as they launched their career from suburban Tampa Florida, quickly signing with Georgia-based Capricorn Records, flagship of hard-core Southern rock acts like the Allman Brothers and Elvin Bishop. The band’s ostensibly glam persona made them practically un-promotable by the label, and frustration with the label’s handling (particularly with some of the wholly unrelated acts they were co-billed with on tour), as well as the poor terms of their contract led to numerous lineup changes over the course of the band’s brief existence. They would disband shortly after this, their second album, was released in 1974. 

I was introduced to the band’s music by the same guy who turned me on to David Bowie and T. Rex, and they seemed to mostly fit into the same general glam-rock category. Their music doesn’t fit into any clear category though, and their attempt to ride the musical mainstream while at the same time flying the Christian flag surely alienated a lot of religious parents anyway, and probably limited them as far as career options as well. 

The most well-known and memorable track on this album (and probably in the band’s career) is the reality-challenged “Class of 2000”, a Bowie-esque rambling tale of kids growing up on the Moon getting high off sound waves, school deans with “mind whips” and class lessons recorded on “Saturn history tapes”. Despite the cheesy lyrics the tune features some decent guitar work and what actually sounds like a suspiciously Allman-like instrumental break toward the end. “Slick Witch” is another track that wanders well into boogie blues territory despite the glam trappings (Alice Cooper was guilty of that pleasure at times himself). 
The rest of the album shifts around musically. “Showdown” is an organ heavy anthem-like rocker, while “Crystallize and Realize” manages to come across as a sort of psych-inspired pop tune in the vein of Klaatu or maybe something Jeff Lynne might have penned. “Auntie Christy, Harlow” leans straight into heavy prog with a wicked bass line and plenty of percussion backing vocalist Ron Goedert’s rather preachy lyrics about worshiping “the Beast” and hell and damnation, etc., etc. 
My personal favorite is the uncharacteristically laid-back “Walk On” with its simple beat, bluesy guitar breaks and harmonized vocals. Not progressive, boogie or really even rock, but a catchy tune nonetheless. 
White Witch unfortunately didn’t have a chance in the time they existed considering the social climate and temperament of the religious class they claimed kinship with but failed to embrace theologically. Too bad, as they did exhibit a decidedly experimental and broad stylistic bent. This is the better of their two studio albums but still doesn’t merit much more than a ‘decent’ rating; so three stars out of five it is and a mild recommendation to fans of glam rock and American heavy rock from the mid- seventies….~

So if I were to ask you who your favorite Christian glam/hard rock band from Tampa, Florida in the 1970s is, what would you say? Wait! Don’t answer yet. You still haven’t heard White Witch, a band so excellent you might just forget that they were Christian, or from Tampa. “A Spiritual Greeting” (1974), the band’s second album, was a vast improvement over their 1972 self-titled debut (an overpowering hackneyed pop influence, despite vocalist Ron Goedert’s struggle to take things beyond mediocre). “A Spiritual Greeting” has slight tinges of Bowie, Alice Cooper, Queen, The Sweet, and even shades of the lighter AOR fluff that predominated at the time, but remained pretty unique. Lyrically, White Witch’s narratives imparted a veiled religious message and the just flat-out goofy. “We’ll All Ride High In The Saddle” kicks off the album with a tale of a Scrooge McDuck-style tycoon unable to enjoy his wealth due to a spiritual bankruptcy. Another highlight is “Class of 2000,” a naive look at the future complete with silver suits, an obligatory sexy android (a R.I.L.F.?), and machines that get people stoned. What kept White Witch from superstardom? Why does an album this good still rot in obscurity? My guess is that this great band from Florida could not win over the more sophisticated audiences and critics in New York and the UK. And perhaps the world wasn’t ready for Ron Goedert’s crazy vibrating, over-the-top wailing. The guy was fucking nuts, and that is a huge part of why this album is so good. You get that while Bowie may have wanted you to think he was really strange, Ron actually was. He takes on a sort of insane Master of Ceremonies role, presiding over his talented minstrels with a foamy-mouthed madness. Though my cd copy regretably contains no photos of the band, they were very visual in their presentation (as the music and name almost demand) with face paint, gaudy clothes and capes. Ron Goedert died ironically enough in the year of 2000. He didn’t live long enough to see robots we can fuck or White Witch inducted into the Florida Rock n’ Roll Hall of Fame (which they recently were) but, one imagines that he rests a bit easier in Heaven knowing that his White Witch is hailed along side of such luminaries as Molly Hatchet and Miami Sound Machine…….~

This music is so progressive, diverse, well-composed, and flawlessly executed that you will not believe it. Very catchy melodies, very heavy rhythms, very innovative sounds (for the 70’s), great musicianship, it has it all. The compositions are not the kind that just take a couple of chord progressions and repeat them endlessly. Instead, they take you on a ride that doesn’t often repeat itself. I have always considered it a major mystery that this group is not more well-known. (T. Thompson)…..~

The band’s second album was released in 1974. In its creation, Beau Fisher did not take part anymore, as former member of The Tropics Charlie Souza took his place. On “A Spiritual Greeting” Buddy Richardson joined the two former songwriters, and although the number of songs decreased, they did not become less diverse. After the release of the band, Richardson left the band. He was not able to find a decent replacement and after some time the “White Witch” fell apart. The group planned to reunite in the late 90’s, however, this became impossible after June 16, 2000, died of Ron Goedert cancer. Buddy Pendergrass also became a victim of cancer and died on March 16, 2003….~

Critics tend to go with the debut, but I’m going to tell you that the band’s sophomore album is the one to locate and buy. Produced by Ron and Howard Albert, 1974’ “A Spiritual Greeting” isn’t really that different from the debut. While 'Showdown’ and 'Crystallize and Realize’ recall the more progressive stuff from the debut), elsewhere the sophomore album’s certain more diverse and commercial than the debut. To my ears the band also sounded more comfortable in the studio with the writing team of Ronn Goedert (note the extra 'n’ this time around), Buddy Pendergrass, and Buddy Richardson turning in several highly likeable tunes. That said, the same strengths and weaknesses found on the debut were similarly present here as well. As lead singer Goedert’s shrill falsetto remained an acquired taste, but the biggest flaw was the fact these guys never settled on a particular style giving the album a chameleon-like quality. 'Auntie Christy / Harlow’ sounded like heavy metal, 'Slick Witch’ sported a Southern rock feel (and stands as one of the few songs I’ve ever heard that included the word 'Lollapalooza’ in the lyric), 'Auntie Christy’ displayed Sabbath-styled metal moves (with a weird religious oriented lyric), 'Walk On’ was a great slice of top-40 pop (that should have given the a massive hit, with its interplanetary plotline 'Class of 2000’ showcased their Bowie-influenced glam moves, etc., etc. The end result is hit or miss for me, but there are plenty of folks out there who will argue that these guys were great (they were also apparently a pretty good live act)…..Bad Cat….~


Line-up / Musicians 

- Buddy Richardson / guitars 
- Bill Peterson / drums & percussion 
- Hardin Pendergrass / keyboards 
- Charles Souza / bass 
- Ron Goedert / vocals


Tracklist 
We’ll All Ride High (Money Bags) 5:08 
Slick Witch 4:51 
Walk On 3:35 
Class Of 2000 6:15 
Showdown 4:07 
Crystallize And Realize 4:53 
Black Widow Lover 3:53 
Auntie Christy/Harlow 5:17 









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