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Sunday, 10 June 2018

Chaka Khan / Freddie Hubbard / Joe Henderson / Chick Corea / Stanley Clarke / Lenny White ‎"Echoes Of An Era" 1982 Jazz Bop Fusion


Chaka Khan / Freddie Hubbard / Joe Henderson / Chick Corea / Stanley Clarke / Lenny White ‎"Echoes Of An Era" 1982 Jazz Bop Fusion 
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https://www.deezer.com/en/album/86790

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Echoes Of An Era, a selection of well-chosen standards done the old-fashioned way with mics on everybody, no more than two takes of anything, no overdubs—but departing from the norm by featuring the vocals of R&B siren Chaka Khan. Khan skillfully runs through the paces on a series of Corea’s athletically demanding arrangements. First, the Pinkard/Tracy/Tauber standard “Them There Eyes,” then the Ella Fitzgeraldesque swoop-and-scat “All Of Me,” followed by a galloping romp through Thelonious Monk’s “I Mean You” that is full of unison jumps and masterful comping and soloing from Corea, as he does some of the best interpreting of Monk since Monk. The titles are all familiar—George Gershwin’s “I Loves You Porgy,” Billy Strayhorn’s “Take The ‘A’ Train,” Frank Loesser’s “I Hear Music”—but Khan’s fresh approach is anything but familiar. – AllAboutJazz…..~


The comments harsly critiquing Chaka’s foray into Jazz are simply ill conceived. First, the jazz greats like Chick Corea, Joe Henderson, Stanley Clarke, et.al., were the best judges to decide whether or not Chaka was up to snuff. Secondly, jazz, despite great efforts to the contrary, is not an elitist artform. There is not one right way to perform a piece. There is not one level of proficiency that legitimizes talent. There is abundant room for interpretation; this is at the core of jazz expression. It would be like comparing Ella with Sarah for the purposes of eliminating one. They were both talented, but their approaches and technical prowess were quite different; they each have their place in jazz history. 

A more accurate way to describe Chaka’s seminal jazz effort is to say that in these early recording she expressed a natural feel for jazz, but did not exhibit the fine expression seen in one singing jazz as a lifetime endeavor. That said and notwithstanding her need for woodshedding, she demonstrates a natural talent for jazz that some current jazz singers would kill for. It’s also worth mentioning that they took no more than two takes on each of the recording to try to get a fresh and retro sound. 

Producers like Quincy Jones and Herbie Hancock have it right; get the artists together and let them create something new, perhaps unexpected, and replete with energy and enthusiams. For example, Christina Aguilera performance on “A Song For You”. Hers is a worthy jazz vocal effort. Just like Chaka’s venture into jazz a few decades ago. These efforts by non-jazz artists serve to influence and inspire young artists of every genre and attract a wider audience base to the the jazz genre in general. 

Jazz is not what one thinks it ought to be. It simply is. It is alive and as such its boundries are shaped by the past, not limited by it. The problem with critics, such as those seen here, is that they forget that they themselves are limited by their personal experiences and understanding of something that is not the same as it was yesterday. In a word, they are suffering from a severe case of nostalgia These limiting attitudes about jazz are what may cause its demise. If jazz is going to continue as an evolving artform, it must be infused by views that are unique and sometimes tangential (like Parker). It must be inviting to both the listener and the performer alike. 

So, is Chaka on a par with Sarah Vaughn with respect to jazz vocal/musicianship? No, but neithter was Ella. For that matter, Tony Benett is not on a par with Mel Torme’s scatting ability, but both are legitimate voices in jazz. However, Chaka’s “Echoes of An Era” is filled with fresh and richly unique interpretations of jazz standards. It will definitely find its place in your jazz collection. 

By the way, Chaka recorded Dizzy Gillespie’s “A Night In Tunisia” under the name “The Memory Still Lingers On”… and guess who played the trumpet solo?… that’s right, Dizzy. You don’t get a much better validation than that…..by….R. J. Lopez….~


I bought this “album” back when it was orignally released. I was completely blow away by Chaka Khan. Back in the 1980’s no one; ok obviously Lenny White did, but other than him who would have expected this type of peformance from Chaka (Yvette). Thanks Rhino for bringing this album to CD. My album is locked up for prosperity. Few of my generation would beleive Chaka had the capabilities she demonstrates on this album. Thanks Lenny White for having the confidence in her and the other accomplished musicians for giving her the opportunity to strut her stuff with such talent…..by…. Kenneth Burns….~


I purchased this album when it first hit the market in 1982, I believe. In my mind the only two women who could possibly bring Billie Holiday back to life is, Chaka Khan and Diana Ross. This album shows the unique talent of Chaka Khan and her ability to…on the spot, do just that. Record this wonderful album in only two days. Not to mention the talented musicians like, Chick Corea, Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard, Stanley Clarke, and Lenny White himself who supported and blended so well with her. Lenny White out did himself with this production. I have searched for this album off and on for years. Not long ago, I searched Amazon.com. I asked if you could please find this album. Out of sheer frustration, because my album is getting old, I checked again and to my surprise here it is! If you are a lover of music, no matter what era, this album will not disappoint you. Amazon, you have made my day!! 
I now have to order two of them. One for myself and one for a friend. 
Thank you sooooooooo much!!…by sha….~





Echoes of an Era buy CD music Drummer, Lenny White, assembles an allstar cast to showcase Chaka Khan’s first presentation as a jazz singer. Echoes of an Era songs The band is great, especially Chick Corea (piano) and, the always outstanding, Freddie Hubbard (trumpet). Echoes of an Era album for sale Lenny White, as a producer, was determined to do this album in one take. This put unnecessary pressure on Chaka. On her heroic performance of the demanding,‘Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most’ we can actually hear one of the strongest singers around crack notes- three times! 'High Wire’, 'I Loves You Porgy’, and 'I Mean You’ are the best among many highlights, but White should’ve given Chaka a little rest and a coupla retakes. Chaka wouldn’t record a jazz record again for 20 years (see 'ClassiKhan’). This great record could’ve been greater if White would have been more sensitive toward his famous star vocalist. By St.Davey (Windham, Me.)…~



Echoes of an Era buy CD music Drummer, Lenny White, assembles an allstar cast to showcase Chaka Khan’s first presentation as a jazz singer. Echoes of an Era songs The band is great, especially Chick Corea (piano) and, the always outstanding, Freddie Hubbard (trumpet). Echoes of an Era album for sale Lenny White, as a producer, was determined to do this album in one take. This put unnecessary pressure on Chaka. On her heroic performance of the demanding,'Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most’ we can actually hear one of the strongest singers around crack notes- three times! 'High Wire’, 'I Loves You Porgy’, and 'I Mean You’ are the best among many highlights, but White should’ve given Chaka a little rest and a coupla retakes. Chaka wouldn’t record a jazz record again for 20 years (see 'ClassiKhan’). This great record could’ve been greater if White would have been more sensitive toward his famous star vocalist. By St.Davey (Windham, Me.)…~



Best known in the mainstream for her superb 1984 cover of Prince’s “I Feel for You,” R&B singer Chaka Khan enjoyed solo success as well as popularity as a member of the group Rufus. Born Yvette Marie Stevens in Great Lakes, IL, on March 23, 1953, she was raised on Chicago’s South Side, and at the age of 11 formed her first group, the Crystalettes. While still in high school, she joined the Afro-Arts Theater, a group which toured with Motown great Mary Wells; a few years later, she adopted the African name Chaka Khan while working on the Black Panthers’ breakfast program. After quitting high school in 1969, Khan joined the group Lyfe, soon exiting to join another dance band, the Babysitters; neither was on the fast track to success, but her fortunes changed when she teamed with ex-American Breed member Kevin Murphy and André Fisher to form Rufus. 

Debuting in 1973 with a self-titled effort on the ABC label, Rufus was among the pre-eminent funk groups of the decade; distinguished by Khan’s dynamic vocals, the group earned half a dozen gold or platinum albums before she went solo in 1978. Produced by Arif Mardin, Chaka proved to be a significant hit on the strength of the single “I’m Every Woman” (a hit over a decade later for Whitney Houston); however, Khan’s success was somewhat tempered by her public rivalry with the remaining members of Rufus, to whom she was still contractually bound for two more LPs. (Their differences were eventually resolved in a 1982 concert at New York’s Savoy Theater, issued as Stompin’ at the Savoy.) As a solo artist, Khan recorded backing vocals for Ry Cooder’s 1979 effort Bop Till You Drop, then cut her sophomore album, 1980’s Naughty; it was not a hit, however, nor was its follow-up, What Cha’ Gonna Do for Me. 

In 1982, Khan recorded Echoes of an Era, a collection of jazz standards featuring performances from Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Stanley Clarke, Chick Corea, and Lenny White. Her pop career was on shaky ground when she released 1984’s I Feel for You, a platinum-seller launched by its title cut, a Grammy-winning, rap-inspired rendition (featuring memorable cameos from Melle Mel and Stevie Wonder) of a fairly obscure Prince album track. Still, while subsequent LPs like 1986’s Destiny and 1988’s C.K. kept Khan riding high on the R&B charts, her standing in pop’s mainstream again began to wane, and at the end of the 1980s, she relocated to Europe. 

In 1990, she won another Grammy for “I’ll Be Good to You,” a duet with Ray Charles. Come 2 My House, released on Prince’s independent label, appeared in 1998, years after Khan had a falling out with Warner Bros. Just after penning the autobiography Chaka! Through the Fire, she collected another Grammy – in 2004 – for performing Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” with the Funk Brothers in Standing in the Shadows of Motown. Classikhan, featuring several interpretations of jazz standards, followed later that year. As she continued an active touring schedule, she recorded Funk This, a set of relatively funky originals and covers (produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis), released in 2007….~ 




Credits 
Chaka Khan - vocals 
Stanley Clarke - acoustic bass 
Chick Corea - piano 
Lenny White - drums 
Freddie Hubbard - trumpet, flugelhorn 
Joe Henderson - tenor saxophone












Tracklist 
Them There Eyes 3:50 
All Of Me 4:31 
I Mean You 3:25 
I Love You Porgy 6:25 
Take The A Train 6:23 
I Hear Music 4:20 
High Wire - The Aerialist 6:31 
All Of Me (Alternate Take) 4:15 
Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most 8:25 

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