Sunday, 10 June 2018

Elyse Weinberg “Elyse” 1969 (feat Neil Young) debut album + “Greasepaint Smile” 1969 released 2015 second album Canada Psych Folk,Folk Rock


Elyse Weinberg “Elyse” 1969 (feat Neil Young) debut album + “Greasepaint Smile” 1969 released 2015 second album Canada Psych Folk,Folk Rock 
full vk  “Elyse” 1969
full citizen freak  “Elyse” 1969

http://citizenfreak.com/titles/306359-weinberg-elyse-cori-bishop-elyse

full bandcamp  “Elyse” 1969

https://orangetwinrecords.bandcamp.com/album/elyse

full  “Greasepaint Smile” 1969 on spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/4SFEF4Dg6Kl5aJtmsr8V0s

full  "Greasepaint Smile" 1969 on bandcamp

https://numerophon.bandcamp.com/album/elyse-weinberg-greasepaint-smile

Elyse Weinberg  "Greasepaint Smile" 1969 full second album citizen freak

http://citizenfreak.com/titles/324730-weinberg-elyse-cori-bishop-greasepaint-smile

interview…by…Elyse Weinberg 

http://www.inmusicwetrust.com/articles/46h06.html

official website

http://www.elyseweinberg.com/



Elyse Weinberg “Elyse” 1969 (feat Neil Young) debut album 
Released in 1968, “Elyse” actually received much critical acclaim, and while not a commercial hit, the record sold fairly well, even prompting an appearance on Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show”. Two more albums were recorded but never released. Included on this CD reissue are two songs from this era, one of which, “Houses”, features Neil Young wielding his distinctively ripping guitar sound…..~

For me, receiving this CD is the culmination of life long memory. When I was 19 I lived in a semi-communal house in Milwaukee (early 70s!). It was a time of great adventures. During that time, I heard this record. Someone there owned it, and I really loved it. So for all these MANY years, I have remembered the song about Sir John Velveteen: the melody, some of the lyrics. But I could never find it. And I’ve been looking, all these years. 

So suddenly, something prompted me to search on Amazon. And there it was. I recognized the cover! Couldn’t believe it. And then receiving it, and hearing it again – seeing how accurate my memory had been – was so emotional, I can’t even express it. And at the beginning, you can actually hear someone setting the needle on the record! Someone cared enough to record this CD directly from the album. My sincere thanks go to whomever that person was. I am so, so happy to have this record again. I love her singing, her guitar playing is phenomenal (now I see that I stole some styles from her in my own playing!). It’s the feeling of recovering some lost thing that was very important in your life, that you never stopped missing, and now you have it back. Just wonderful….by…. Susan K. Noel….~


This reissue is long overdue!! I have owned the LP version of this for thirty years or so(found it in a cut out bin for less than a buck) and absolutely love it!! I have played this for friends and told everyone to buy it if they ever came across a copy. So now it is on CD so hopefully more people will hear it. Elyse Weinberg’s only recording so far as I know, this could be classified in the similar style of Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Bert Jansch,etc. Elyse’s voice is sort of like Dylan,kind of hoarse and rough but full of emotion. Her lyrics are very intelligent and the music is well played. Elyse plays 6 and 12 string acoustic and is backed on some tracks by a full electric band who sound something like Dylan’s backing bands on Blonde on Blonde or Highway 61. Colin Walcott(an excellent jazz musician who would later form OREGON) plays sitar and tabla on some tracks. Elyse does a fine version of a Bert Jansch song “deed I do” which I don’t think Jansch ever recorded. Evidently there are two bonus tracks on this CD which were not on the original LP. One apparently has Neil Young on it. I am unaware of the vintage of these two tracks. But I highly recommend this recording to anyone who loves good folk rock from the late sixties or any era…by… Ronald D. Martin….~

First, for the benefit of those clowns who ask where Neil Young is on this album, printed very clearly on the leaflet is written under track 13 “Neil Young on guitar”. It’s tragic that these idiots have dragged the star-rating of this masterpiece down. As for the quality of it, well, there’s not a lot to compare it to, Buffy Sainte-Marie’s “Illuminations”, but not much else. Women respond differently to psychedelics than how men do, but this ranks right up there alongside “Sgt Peppers” or “Forever Changes” or pretty much anything else. If you can’t love it you’re dead…..by…. Len Oakes….~

Perhaps best known to a select group of late-‘60s psych rock fans and revivalists as Elyse, Elyse Weinberg was born in Canada and, after making small waves on the Toronto folk scene in the 1960s (the same place and time as such legendary names as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell), moved to Los Angeles and scored a deal with Bill Cosby’s Tetragrammaton Records, a deal helped along from a connection to another star of the time, Mama Cass. Working with a session band – Touch – Weinberg soon recorded her debut album, under the moniker (and title) Elyse. A folk-pop record with flourishes of medieval folk and psychedelia – a pretty standard mix at that point of that particular decade – Elyse was a minor hit, placing well within the Top 40. Weinberg began hitting the Los Angeles folk circuit, playing shows at such well-known venues as the Troubadour, and even landed an appearance on The Tonight Show on NBC. 
Although comparisons to Joni Mitchell and Laura Nyro were made in the mainstream press, and Cher’s recording of the Weinberg-penned “Band of Thieves” pointed to the beginning of a illustrious career, the demise of her label – and the declining interest in the folk-rock sound as the decade ended – marked the beginning of the end of her career in music instead. With Tetragrammaton out of the picture – and Elyse’s second album (Grease Paint Smile), which featured Neil Young, now shelved – Weinberg gave it one last go, signing to the Asylum label. There she recorded her third album, Wildfire, but it was to remain unreleased as well. 

Eventually, Weinberg faded from performing, and then even changed her identity, taking the name Cori Bishop and moving away from Los Angeles to settle in Santa Fe, NM. By the 1990s, Weinberg – that is to say, Bishop – found herself in Ashland, OR, working in an insurance office. In 2000, the former Elyse Weinberg was surprised to receive a phone call from Andrew Rieger of Elf Power, who was hoping to re-release the Elyse album on his label, Orange Twin. Rieger, who had picked up the LP in a shop after liking the cover, contacted Weinberg/Bishop’s old songwriting collaborator, Rich Goldman, who then put Rieger in touch with Bishop. 

Bishop, excited at the prospect of her work seeing a new audience, jumped at the chance to give her work a CD release. Unfortunately, the original masters had been destroyed, and the new CD had to be culled from a mint-condition copy of the LP. Orange Twin was able to release Elyse to a warm critical reception in 2001. With her work finding new life and new fans appearing to hear her perform, Bishop soon formed a new, more casual band, called Baby Cori & the Buds, and began performing locally. She has also become a member of the Southern Oregon Songwriters Association….by Chris True…..~

* She released her first album “Elyse” in 1969 on Tetragammaton T 117 (USA) / Polydor (Canada). This label was the same label that released the first four Deep Purple albums as well as Carol Burnett. The album reached #31 on Billboard 
* Elyse goes by the name Cori Bishop. 
* She had recorded this album, but Tetragammaton went belly up so it was never released. 
* She then recorded the album “Wildfire” with Neil Young on the Asylum label, but it too was never released. 
* In 2001, “Elyse” was re-issued on CD on Orange Twin OT-001 and contains the bonus track “Houses”, from the unreleased album Wildfire, which featured Neil Young on guitar…..~
In 1969, Northwest singer/songwriter Elyse Weinberg released a self-titled album that attracted a small audience for its low-key blend of blues, folk and psychedelia. Weinberg then quickly faded into obscurity. More than 30 years later, a Georgia band called Elf Power found her record in a thrift store and bought it on the basis of its groovy cover. The band members were so blown away when they heard it that they tracked Weinberg down at her home in Ashland and asked if they could re-release it. 
The “Elyse Weinberg” CD release show, at which she will dust off a live set that hasn’t been performed much in the past three decades, should be a genuine case of the past coming back to life. 
9 p.m. Thursday, Medicine Hat Gallery, 1834 N.E. Alberta St.; the Places and Hutch Harris open; cover charge. 
– Stan Hall……~ 
  POSSIBLY THE most obscure Neil Young track ever recorded has been reissued after a chance discovery in Missoula, Mont.The recording is a heartfelt, penetrating guitar lead originally laid down for a friend’s vinyl LP in 1970, just before Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young shot to fame. 
Now the track has resurfaced on a CD called Elyse. The title refers to Elyse Weinberg, a gifted if largely unheralded Toronto folk singer who lived communally with Young in an apartment above a Yorkville coffeehouse in the mid-1960s. 
She moved to California in 1968, two years after Young. She stayed first at Young’s place, then moved in with Cass Elliott of the Mamas and the Papas. Later, Weinberg invited Young to record the guitar lead for her song, “Houses.” 
“I remember we sat in the production room itself, right next to the console,” she says by phone now from her home in Ashland, Ore. “I was sitting next to him, with my arm around him as he played. He said something like, 'Sit next to me,’ so I did. I guess he just felt comfortable that way.” 
The closeness of that moment still comes through. Young’s playing is strong, distinctive and warm, qualities that could equally be said of the album as a whole. 
With its mix of pastoral folk-rock and urban psychedelia, Elyse conjures up an era of collective sharing and musical adventurism that the latest CSN&Y reunion tour is also bound to recall when it arrives at the Air Canada Centre for concerts Tuesday and Wednesday. 
The CD reissue has even revived Weinberg’s performing career. After an absence of more than 20 years, she took the stage last November in Portland, Ore., backed by a U.S. punk band, Elf Power - her rediscoverers and foremost champions. “It’s just short of miraculous that somebody would find the record and then care enough to do what they did,” she says. “I’ve started doing little concerts for this and that, and I’m plotting another album.” 
The story of Elyse and the forgotten Young track begins in the late summer of 1965. 
Young, at 19, was in a bad way. After developing as a guitarist with a series of rock bands in Winnipeg and Thunder Bay, he had returned to his native Toronto to make a push with his latest group, the Squires. After five months of constant rehearsal, however, the band had not landed a single gig. 
With no money and no obvious prospects, Young disbanded the Squires and offered himself as a solo acoustic act in the flourishing Yorkville coffeehouse district. There he met a circle of folk singers and moved in with four of them, at an apartment above the Night Owl coffeehouse at 102 Avenue Rd. 
Besides Weinberg, the tenants included: Ken Koblun, erstwhile bass player for the Squires and later for Weinberg’s band, O.D. Bodkin; Vicky Taylor, an attraction at the Mousehole among other venues; and Donna Warner, vocalist for Three’s a Crowd, who played at the Penny Farthing and Yorkville’s top club, the Riverboat. 
Often, Weinberg says, visitors slept on the living-room floor in sleeping bags. “We were all really young,” she recalls. “People would come and go, discovering one another. We were discovering life and discovering the scene, and being the scene without even knowing it.” 
Out-of-town connections led Weinberg to seek a record deal in New York and later Los Angeles. By then, Young was living in Topanga Canyon and playing in his first major band, Buffalo Springfield, which also featured Stephen Stills. Weinberg arrived in time to attend their final concert at Long Beach, Calif., on May 5, 1968. 
The following year, she released her debut album, Elyse, on Tetragrammaton Records. 
By June, it had risen to No. 31 on the Record World magazine chart, immediately behind Young’s second solo album, Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere. 
Weinberg began to attract notice. She appeared on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, and was written up in Newsweek. The magazine profiled her with other such rising female stars as Joni Mitchell, praising Weinberg’s “cracked, mournful delivery” on songs that “often recall medieval ballads.” 
Three years later, Weinberg released a second album, Grease Paint Smile. A third album on Asylum Records was never released. “And then I just sort of drifted away,” she says. 
Drifted away, that is, until three years ago when a punk band from Georgia, while touring the western states, unearthed Elyse. “I often find myself searching through stacks of records at thrift stores and yard sales, always hoping to come across the Holy Grail,” Elf Power lead singer and guitarist Andrew Rieger .
“Over the years, this Holy Grail has eluded me, until one day in 1999, while on a cross-country trip, I was rummaging through a box of records in a thrift store in Missoula, Mont., and came across a record cover featuring a beautiful and strange drawing … 
"The title simply said Elyse, and the price was one dollar.” 
Rieger’s definition of the Holy Grail was “some amazing … record … by some long-forgotten obscure artist.” 

Back in Georgia, his turntable was broken. It was six months before he heard the record, but when he did he loved it. 
“What really blew me away was the singing,” he writes. “Elyse’s voice manages to be very pretty and melodic, while also sounding very desperate and ragged, quivering and shaking through songs brimming with a sense of impending doom. Scary and magical stuff.” 
Rieger resolved to get the album reissued on Orange Twin Records, an Internet label run by Elf Power’s keyboard player, Laura Carter. They doggedly tracked down Weinberg under the name Cori Bishop, a change she made shortly after recording Grease Paint Smile. 
The master tapes had been destroyed the year before, but Rieger and Carter found a pristine copy of the Elyse LP on eBay for $20. They made a digital version, improved the sound and added two tracks from Grease Paint Smile. 
One of them was “Houses,” with the Neil Young track. It was recorded in San Francisco in 1970, Weinberg says, just before Young joined David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash to form the supergroup CSN&Y, famed for their vocal harmonies and the intense guitar playing of Young and Stills. 
The final CD included 14 songs. A first edition of 1,000 copies was released. Then last November, Elf Power invited Weinberg to join them onstage in Portland. 
“I go, 'Okay,’ but I’m a little alarmed, because I listened to that album, and I don’t sing in those keys any more,” Weinberg recalls. 
“Fortunately, they picked a couple of ballads, so I practise, and I drive up there to the club. This is in some real grungy downtown industrial area, and as I walk in I hear my song coming over the speakers,” she says. 
“We had agreed that we’d try a sound check, and if it sounds okay, they’ll back me. If not, I’ll perform solo. And they played like angels, better than the album. 
"Then my next fear is, I look around and I see 20-something kids with tattoos and earrings everywhere. I’m thinking, 'They’re coming to see Elf Power, this rock band, and I’m standing up here with my acoustic guitar.’” 
In the end, Weinberg says, the show worked. “They got it,” she says of the crowd. “They were coming up afterwards and touching me and going, 'Good set, man.’” …..by…. John Goddard,…..~ 


Credits 

Bass – Bruce Hauser 
Drums – John Bordanaro 
Guitar – Joey Newman (2), Neil Young 
Guitar [Six String], Twelve-String Guitar, Vocals – Elyse J. Weinberg* 
Keyboards – Don Gallucci 
Performer [Basic Tracks] – The Band Of Thieves 
Sitar, Tabla – Colin Walcott* 
Spoons, Illustration [Drawing] – Maureen*


Tracklist 
A1 Band Of Thieves 2:28 
A2 Deed I Do 2:53 
A3 Iron Works 2:53 
A4 Spirit Of The Letter 2:22 
A5 Here In My Heart (Underneath The Spreading Chestnut Tree) 3:12 
A6 Last Ditch Protocol 2:46 
B1 Sweet Pounding Rhythm 2:38 
B2 Meet Me At The Station 2:30 
B3 Simpleminded Harlequin 2:22 
B4 Painted Raven 1:20 
B5 Mortuary Bound 3:26 
B6 If Death Don’t Overtake Me 4:25 







Elyse Weinberg  “Greasepaint Smile” 1969 released 2015 second album

The unreleased second album by an original lady from the canyon. Recorded and recanted in 1969, Greasepaint Smile is more assured than its self-titled, Tetragrammaton-issued predecessor. Weinberg’s finger-picked acoustic is layered over distant drumming, while her gravel-pit voice evokes life, love, and mortality. Fellow Torontonian Neil Young sears “Houses” with his signature fuzz-tone, casting chaos over the beautiful ballad, while J.D. Souther, Kenny Edwards, and Nils Lofgren, pick up the slack. Masterfully produced by David Briggs, Greasepaint Smile has climbed out of the canyon and is bound for every turntable east of the 405…..~

Elyse Weinberg was there and gone. While the 1960’s were closing its doors, Weinberg graduated from Toronto folk clubs to crashing on Neil Young’s Laurel Canyon couch to the Billboard charts within one prolific year. She played The Tonight Show and was featured in Newsweek. One of her songs was recorded as a title track for a cinematic Cher vehicle. It appeared, even beyond the Hollywood Hills, that Weinberg was poised to launch. But within a year, the bright lights began to dim and she quietly walked away. Informed by her astrological study and an awakened spiritual urge, Weinberg left the phony grin she sang about in Greasepaint Smite behind her and, with that, the music business. 

Weinberg got her first guitar at age 12. As she learned lo play, the young musician gravitated toward folk tunes, eventually mastering the Carter Family’s “Wildwood Flower.” By the mid-1960s in Montreal, teenage Elyse was already down the rabbit hole, reading Broadside magazine and taping records by Greenwich Village folkies—Eric Andersen, Phil Ochs, Dave Van Ronk—onto her reel-to-reel so she could slow down the tapes to learn the guitar parts. When Reverend Gary Davis came to town, she looked after him, kept him in whiskey, and studied his fingers on the guitar neck. 

Three years into McGill University in Montreal, Weinberg dropped out and moved to Toronto where the folk scene included heavies like Ian Sc Sylvia and Joni Mitchell, as well as headies like David Wiffen and Bob Carpenter. Renting a spot in a communal house on Bishop Street, she lived in a space where music and traveling artists shared real estate with a dog, pregnant feral cats, an iguana, and iwo monkeys. She formed a band called O.D. Bodkin and Company (she was O.D.) and played Toronto’s Yorkshire coffeehouse district in haunts like the Bohemian Embassy, the Gate of Cleve, and the Mousetrap. These were days of counterculture consumption, documented specifically in the song “Ironworks” on her first record. But in the 1960s, Weinberg was there for more than just the party. She was tuning in to the cognitive and creative aspects of her Scorpio identity. 

On the surface, she describes her behavior as being “a bundle of reactions,” but the songs she was writing went somewhere deeper. Travels took her to Israel and throughout Europe, briefly to New York City, and then back to Toronto. Weinberg was flamboyant and serious, often wearing a purple crushed velvet cape beneath her long dark hair. She described the urgency in her voice at the time as an “old gravel pit.” Despite the creative buzz and creative community of Toronto, Weinberg wanted to make records and knew that meant leaving town. Neil Young, an old friend who often camped out at the Bishop Street house in a sleeping bag, urged her to head west. 

In the spring of 1968, she moved to Eos Angeles to crash on Young’s couch in Topanga Canyon during Buffalo Springfield’s final bow. She then became roommates with Cass Elliot, another musician connected to the Canadian folk clubs. When Elliot heard Weinberg’s song “Darlin’ Please Believe Me,” she set up a meeting with Silver, who managed Elliot’s old group before she joined The Mamas & the Papas, The Big 3. Weinberg only had enough money to travel one way in a cab to Silver’s office across town. By afternoon’s end, Silver had signed her to a management and recording contract. Not only did he give her cab fare home, he got her an apartment in Laurel Canyon and bought her a green Pontiac Le Mans, her first car. 

Elysewas released on Tetragrammaton Records in May of 1969, when she was 23 years old. The label ran ads for the album with the tagline: “Because Cass Elliott called and asked us to listen.” Coowned with Bill Cosby, Tetragrammaton played home to a roster that included Pat Boone, Deep Purple, and Biff Rose and released the John Lennon and Yoko Ono album Two Virgins when Capitol Records deemed it too controversial. Silver was a mover and shaker, an insider whose reach went beyond the music business. He managed Joan Rivers and Bob Dylan in their early days and orchestrated the televised, ratings-winning wedding between Tiny Tim and Miss Vicki on The Tonight Show. Silver worked all industry angles in Hollywood, eventually opening a Chinese restaurant on Sunset Boulevard in John Barrymore’s old house where he hosted late night parties while selling Sichuan noodles and pork fried rice, just to keep his finger on the pulse. Silver could make things happen, and Weinberg was his focus. 

Elyse peaked at #31 on the Billboard chart as Weinberg toured the folk circuit. Newsweek, in a July 1969 feature on visionary female troubadours with the demeaning title “The Girls—Letting Go,” included Weinberg alongside Joni Mitchell, Laura Nyro, and Melanie. The writer described Weinberg’s songs as death-obsessed, comparing them to “medieval ballads,” and her vocal delivery to Bob Dylan’s on John Wesley Harding. But to Weinberg, the songs involved more struggle. “Everyone has just one song they sing,” she said to the reporter, “and these songs are about people who hold onto everything and anything that’s holding them back or getting them down or getting them high—people who just don’t know how to let go.” 

Silver’s pull got Weinberg booked twice on The Tonight Show with Johnny Canon, but the show bumped her each time. The third time was the charm, and she performed Bert Jansch’s “Oh, Deed I Do,” the album’s single, but that’s where the good luck ended. Her guitar was mixed too low and her performance faltered. Adding insult to injury, when the night’s guest-host, Flip Wilson, held up a copy of her record with the cellophane still on, the studio lights blinded the album cover. “It was a very unsatisfying experience, all in all,” she remembers. Silver ever the play-maker, also convinced Cher to record the album’s opening cut, “Band of Thieves,” for her acting debut in the 1969 film Chastity. The film and soundtrack flopped. Worse for Weinberg, her song was retitled “Chastity’s Theme,” and the closing credits erroneously listed Sonny Bono as the composer. 

By the summer of 1969, her debut was still fresh and her follow-up was already recorded. Produced by Neil Young’s engineer, David Briggs, Greasepaint Smile features J.D. Souther on drums, an 18-year-old Nils Lofgren on guitar (“Greasepaint Smile, "Collection Bureau”), and Kenny Edwards on bass, among others. Neil Young welcomed the invitation from his old friend to play guitar on one song, “Houses,” where his infamous 1953 Gibson Les Paul, “Old Black,” makes its first appearance on record without assistance from an amp. 

These were fuzzy times, but Weinberg recalls this part of the session well: “I remember us sitting in the control room, and Neil was plugged directly into the soundboard. I had my arm around him and he just began ripping out these beautiful guitar lines. It was very sweet and intimate.” It’s a song that skips between time signatures while metaphorically acknowledging the difficulty of sharing the world with others. Or, as Weinberg more succinctly states when asked about the song: “We all have our stuff.” David Briggs, in an article in Record World in August of 1969, distinguishes Greasepaint Smile from its predecessor: “All the people are playing to the vocal rather than vice versa.” That’s accurate. 

On Greasepaint Smile you hear a band with more of Weinberg, her voice and picking out front, as Biblical allusions blur with images of Laurel Camon nights and mornings-after. She is the sole writer on all these songs, minus her return to the Carter Family catalog for the song “Gospel Ship.” Though pleased with the album, she didn’t have creative control. “I didn’t know I could have an opinion. I just turned up. I was just the chick singer!” Arid as she listens hack now, she says, “I hear a young woman wanting to be loved. I hear a spiritual yearning for a higher love. I know it now, but 1 didn’t know it then.” It’s this raw wisdom that makes this record so compelling. But despite Tetragrammaton reserving a catalog number and completing die photo shoot for the album cover, the label was in financial trouble. During the release of Deep Purple’s third album, their most profitable artist, they went bankrupt and closed shop. 

By 1970, Weinberg was spending her nights at the Troubadour club. She played the Monday open mics along with performers like Warren Zevon, Cheech & Chong, and Jackson Browne, who Silver also managed early on, J.D. Souther and Glenn Frey were among the regulars, pre-Eagles, performing as Longbranch Pennywhistle and occasionally doubling as Weinberg’s backing hand. But during daylight, little was happening, so she left for another adventure as Greasepaint Smile got Comfy in the attic of lost albums. Weinberg landed in London after touring with the Great Medicine Ball Caravan, the hippie troupe designed and documented in the 1971 film of the same name. The troupe’s mission: spread counter-culture love and wisdom— Aquarian missionaries to the straights on the Warner Brothers’ dime, a corporate package made up to mimic Woodstock’s aesthetic and profits. The troupe included musical acts like B.B. King, Doug Kershaw, Alice Cooper, The Youngbloods, and, in the final overseas festival, Pink Floyd. Weinberg joined after hearing there was room on tour from her friend, the tour’s official tie-dyer. 

When the Great Medicine Ball Caravan wrapped, Weinberg met with former label-mate and Deep Purple bassist Randy Glover in London to discuss him producing her next album. But even before recording began, Roy Silver called and urged her to return home to make a third album, this time for a new label owned by his friend and future mogul, David Geffen. Weinberg signed to Asylum in August of 1971, becoming one of the label’s first artists alongside Browne, Souther, The Eagles, Linda Ronstadt, and Judee Sill. But after the album wrapped, Weinberg had a falling out with Silver, her longtime champion, and the deal disappeared. 

For the second time in a few years, Weinberg completed an album that no one would hear. The Asylum album remains unreleased. The only known copy is a faded cassette. The story of Weinberg’s time in the L.A. scene can be heard in her song, “City of the Angels.” It’s a tune she describes as “reflecting on the milieu that you’re moving in and not liking it,” but her exit isn’t as clearly documented. 

Weinberg stayed in L.A. for the next decade or so, distancing herself from the music business that was always at odds with her muse. She moved to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and then rural Oregon, where she lives today. Weinberg changed not only her residence, but also her name. Based on her beliefs in numerology, where numbers represent letters and each number represents an energy value, she reinvented herself as Cori Bishop. 

Bishop kept making music quietly through the 1990’s, and in 2001 approved a reissue of her debut, Elyse, on Orange Twin Records. The reboot included two songs from Greasepaint Smile, “Houses” arid “What You Call It.” Here, those songs are presented in their original context for 
the first time. Bishop self-released her fourth album in 2009, under her professional name Elyse Weinberg, titled In My Own Sweet Time, When asked about current plans, Bishop says she is continuing on her spiritual path and studying metaphysics, as she becomes “closer to dropping the body.” Listening to the album now, Bishop says of the title track, “It’s about the facades of who we are and how we keep trying to shed those facades.” Exactly what you’d expect when hearing her sing the song’s final, pleading line: “Bring me down the road another mile.” For Bishop, the journey is about transcending the destination. …..by Jerry David DeCicca, January 2015……~

This is an album recorded by Elise Weinberg in 1969 but never released. Weinberg was a part of the Laurel Canyon scene, which shows strongly here - there is a mix of the wistful with just her and her acoustic picking to the fairly rocky in band numbers like City Of the Angels, with shades in between. Elise Weinberg has a fine, husky voice which put me strongly in mind of Melanie Safka (I am showing my age here, I know), there are some notable guest artists - including Neil Young contributing lead guitar to Houses - and it’s all decently produced. 

I think I’d have liked this album a lot in 1969. It went with the mood of the time, it has some decent stuff on it and as a 15-year-old would-be peacenik I searched out a lot of this stuff, some of which has endured and a lot of which hasn’t. I don’t really think this has. It certainly deserves to see the light of day, but I have to say that the material overall isn’t that great, the guitar work is perfectly nice but pretty ordinary and after a couple of listens I’ve heard enough for now. I’ll probably go back to it a few times, but more as an interesting historical record of a time than for real enjoyment of the music. The lyrics feel a bit limp these days and musically there’s nothing especially interesting here. 

There’s nothing actually wrong with Greasepaint Smile; it’s a perfectly competent album which reflects its time, but I think it belongs in that time and it’s much more of an interesting period piece than something to be played repeatedly. I’d suggest finding some samples and seeing what you think; you may like this far more than I do, but personally I can only give it a rather lukewarm recommendation….by Sid Nunclus…..~


Elyse Weinberg is a longtime favorite of Aquarium Drunkard, whose husky voice was introduced to many via folk rockers Vetiver. In 2001, her long lost debut, 1968’s Elyse was reissued by Orange Twin Records, a swooning, mystic effort bolstered considerably by bonus track “Houses,” a laidback but insistent groover featuring searing lead guitar by Neil Young. Now, thanks to Numero Group’s Numerophon imprint, one can hear that song presented in its original context, Weinberg’s unreleased second LP, Greasepaint Smile, to be released September 18th. 

Produced by Young’s longtime partner David Briggs in 1969 and featuring Young, J.D. Souther, Kenny Edwards of the Stone Poneys, and a young Nils Lofgren on guitar, the record is a lowdown stunner, loose and funky on songs like “City Of The Angeles” and the winking “Your Place Or Mine,” touched by the spirit on “Gospel Ship,” given to full bore blues rock on “Collection Bureau,” and achingly beautiful on “It’s All Right To Linger.” Over chiming acoustic guitars, fuzzed electrics, and a sympathetic rhythm section, Weinberg’s voice is ragged and sounds far too world weary than her 23 years should allow. Her words follow suit: “It’s all right to linger but it’s no good to stay/when you feel in your heart there’s a better way.” 

Tellingly, Weinberg didn’t stay. Following a bumpy ride through the music industry’s back streets — documented beautifully in notes by Jerry DeCicca — Weinberg took leave of Los Angeles, eventually settling in Oregon, where she’s continued to make music as Cori Bishop. “While the 1960’s were closing its doors, Weinberg graduated from Toronto folk clubs to crashing on Neil Young’s Laurel Canyon couch to the Billboard charts within one prolific year,” DeCicca writes. “But within a year, the bright lights began to dim and she quietly walked away. Informed by her astrological study and an awakened spiritual urge, Weinberg left the phony grin she sang about in Greasepaint Smile behind her and, with that, the music business.” words ….Aquarium Drunkard….~


One of those who slipped through the floorboards, Elyse Weinberg looked to be in the right place when her debut, Elyse, landed in 1969. Cher covered her Band Of Thieves, and Weinberg hung out with Neil Young, JD Souther and Nils Lofgren, who all appear on this second (and previously unreleased) album, produced by David Briggs. 

Having been thrown into a melting pot of female artists, Weinberg kicked against the pricks. She lambasted the phonies on the title track and donned a hair shirt for Nicodemus. Young’s contribution to the song Houses couldn’t be overlooked, though, since he added lashings of guitar style to the venture while Elyse draped her arms round his shoulders. A trek into Carter Family country during Gospel Ship aside, the ditties were all hers: a dark and troubled bunch they are too, as she bites the hand that feeds on City Of The Angels, where the sense that Laurel Canyon is cracking up is felt throughout. ….Record Colllector…..~


You would expect that all forgotten pearls from the past have gradually come off the shelf, but that is not the case. Interesting releases from a distant past still pop up. Greasepaint Smile by Elyse Weinberg dates from 1969 and turns out to be one that lovers of female singer-songwriters should not miss. Elyse Weinberg debuted at the end of the 60s with a self-titled record and was part of the Laurel Canyon scene, which would produce countless female singer-songwriters, including, of course, Joni Mitchell. 
At the time the offer was so great that a not very successful debut immediately ensured a line through the name and that happened to Elyse Weinberg. Greasepaint Smile was therefore not even released in 1969 and Elyse Weinberg disappeared in anonymity. Wrongly turned out now, because the second album of the originally Canadian singer-songwriter at the time is a true gem. The fact that Greasepaint Smile was not released at the time is quite special, because Elyse Weinberg is assisted on her second album by, among others, JD Souther, Nils Lofgren and Neil Young, who throws a gritty guitar solo against it. 
Greasepaint Smile contains a number of subdued songs with beautiful guitar playing and melancholic vocals and some firmer songs with influences from psychedelics and nice solid guitar work. Elyse Weinberg shows on Greasepaint Smile that she is a special singer and that special is also reflected in her songs. The record should have just appeared in 1969 and should have been a modest classic by now. That did not happen, but luckily it is never too late for rehabilitation. Greasepaint Smile from Elyse Weinberg is a very interesting album, which also matters more than 45 years after the planned release……~


Californian folk troubadour Elyse Weinberg has been someting of an underappreciated musical gem until recently. Elyse only released one record under her real name, her self-titled debut album, which hit # 31 on the Billboard charts, prompting an appearance on the Tonight show. Cher even recorded one of Elyse’s songs (“Band of Thieves”) for the 1969 film “Chastity”, but the song was mistakenly credited to Sonny. This led to only minor success in the years that followed before Elyse decided to change her name to Cori Bishop. 

Fast forward 30 years and the discovery of her music by Andrew Rieger of Elf Power. He brought her music to the attention of important people, and along with that attention came critical acclaim, with bands such as Vetiver and Dinosaur Jr. covering her song “Houses”. And now we have a first ever release of her unreleased 1971 album “Greasepaint Smile”. The album was produced by Neil Young’s engineer David Briggs and features a very young Nils Lofgren on guitar. Hearing Elyse’s accomplished singing and playing, very much in the vein of Jefferson Airplane and Fairport Convention with a bit of honky tonk and dancehall vibe, it’s hard to imagine this not being a hit back in the day, had it been released. 

There are wonderful songs like the aforementioned “Houses”, where Neil Young plays guitar and where Elyse channels the late Sandy Denny. Or how about “City of the Angels”, which is prime late 60s folk rock with a backing band that almost sounds like CSN? “What You Call It” is more in the confessional, Joni Mitchell vein so prevalent back then, but Elyse rises above it with good lyrics and a hint of blues behind her folk. “It’s Alright to Linger” might well be a lost classic from The Band and has that honky tonk piano I enjoy so much. “Collection Bureau” is a nice slice of bluesy folk with tasteful guitar licks, while “Gospel Ship” trips down the country blues lane frequented by the Stones (“Sweet Virginia”). “Nicodemus” is another fine bluesy number with harmonica and piano tightly winding around Elyse’s husky vocals. The remaining songs, including the title track “Greasepaint Smile” dwell in the same musical vein and underscore what a fine talent this singer/songwriter is. It’s great to see this become available finally. Recommended for all fans of late 60s folk and blues. …..by Elizabeth Klisiewicz ….~

Musicians 
*Elyse - Vocals 
*J.D. Souther - Drums 
*Nils Lofgren - Guitar 
*Kenny Edwards - Drums 
*Neil Young - Guitar

Tracks 
1. What You Call It - 2:58 
2. City Of The Angels - 3:28 
3. Houses - 3:36 
4. It’s All Right To Linger - 2:47 
5. Collection Bureau - 4:46 
6. Gospel Ship (Traditional) - 2:28 
7. Nicodemus - 4:06 
8. My, My, My - 5:02 
9. Your Place Or Mine - 2:47 
10.Greasepaint Smile - 3:37 


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