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Sunday, 3 June 2018

Los Belkings “Ayer Y Hoy” 1972 Peru Garage Rock,Surf Rock


Los Belkings “Ayer Y Hoy” 1972 Peru Garage Rock,Surf Rock
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Something special must have Lynx, because there have been born fundamental bands for the local and world rock scene. Two examples: Los Saicos and Belking’s, groups born in the 60s whose impact and validity are felt until today.And although Saicos occasionally dare to go on stage, Los Belking’s, since their happy return in 2003, have not stopped offering intimate concerts, where all their musical power shines … Because you have to remember, this band of instrumental rock is one of the most valued in the world.Creating A Legend It all started in 1964, when Wilfredo Sandoval, second guitarist of the band, and Raúl Herrera, first guitar, met. They both studied at the Melitón Carvajal, they started to rehearse, they called a bassist and a drummer and a singer, and they played, like almost any other youth band, to play covers of their favorite groups.
But his creativity gave for more. Soon they met Andrés Roque, a boy from Lince who had amazing compositions. They summoned it and, along with the first creations of Herrera and Sandoval, gave rise to him, first, to several 45 (with own and other subjects), where successes like “El Guasón”, “La playa”, “Negro es negro” were born. , “Theme for young people in love”, “Pushing hard”, “Pipa de paz”, “Psychedelic thesis”, “Love is sad” and, in 1967, to the first LP of the band, called The sound of Belking’s. 

Then they recorded Los Belking’s (1968) and, a year later, Los fabulosos Belking’s (1969) … and, when the party seemed total, Velasco arrived, and he banned the morning and saw rock as alienating, alienating, and the rock scene came in declining. The Belking’s took time to record one more album, Ayer y hoy (1973), totally self-produced, but the bad times for the rock product of the dictatorship and the new professional and family obligations made the band stop playing … although Herrera found in her vocation and profession. 

So they went until 2003, in Spain, was released, without permission from the group, Instrumental Waves, a compilation album that returned them to the world stage. The Belking’s played again and, although up to now they do not charge those royalties, their fans are grateful for that Spanish daring: thanks to that action it is possible, for example, that the band celebrates 50 years of music this Saturday at the Exhibition Park , a music that, half a century later, oozes energy and youth. Missing, fine….~


The Belkings, was an instrumental musical group, that was born in 1964, in the city of Lima Peru, interpreting themes of rock, jazz, ballads, latinos and caribbean, performing in many cases, mixtures of such genres to get themes of popular taste. Its original members were: Wilfredo Sandoval (second guitar), Raul Herrera (first guitar), both founders of the group; then Walter Aray (drums), Jose Olivera (bass) and Daniel Rosario (vocals). The members were changing over time, until 1974, when the group broke up and each one took different courses. The group initially appeared in morning and radio stations to become known, until in 1967 made its first recordings in 45 rpm, with the themes ‘The Guazon’ and 'The Beach’, then other issues would come. Throughout his career the group recorded 4 Lps, the first recorded in 1967 with the name “Sound of the Belkings”, which includes a compilation of their best songs, with which they became very famous and popular nationally and internationally. ; the second recorded in 1968 with the name “The Belkings”, with several songs of their own and some covers; the third recorded in 1969, with the name “Los Fabulosos Belkings”, with 7 own songs and 5 covers; and the fourth recorded in 1973, with the name “Ayer Y Hoy”, with songs compiled of great success, throughout his artistic career, adding national folkloric themes. In short there is much to talk about this magnificent Peruvian instrumental group, very popular in its time; but that in this opportunity……..~


UIn the morning of 1964, at the Cine Riva Agüero - in the El Agustino district - the Gógó Midloni Nagashiro was finishing dancing. Behind the curtains a band of nervous teenagers watched the scene intently. Midloni returned to his dressing room giggling as they stood with their eyes fixed on the stage. The next act was approaching. The master of ceremonies introduced a debutante band: ladies and gentlemen, with you, The Belking’s. At that precise moment the boys began to move and entered the scene wielding their instruments. They were the guitarists Wilfredo Sandoval and Raúl Herrera, along with the bassist and singer Nico and the drummer Kiko “La Serie”. Wilfredo and Raúl were only 15 years old and were students of the Gran Unidad Unidad Melitón Carvajal. Nico and Kiko “The series”, on the other hand, They were somewhat older and seemed more secure in the face of the situation. The boys plugged in their guitars and started playing covers of The Teen Tops like Popotitos and La Plaga -which were also translations of Little Richard-, while the audience whistled and booed them because they wanted to see the dancers again. His third song changed the reaction of the audience. They raided Wipe Out, a song by the Ventures. Upon arriving at the drum solo, Kiko could be heard “The Series” - with long hair grabbed with black and silver woman hooks - playing like a demon, causing the rest of the group to let go of what was inside. The audience began to scream with emotion. Quickly, at the end of the set, the Belking’s got into an ambulance parked on the dirt road in front of the cinema, going with the dancers to the Susy and Comas cinemas, to continue with the morning circuit. This was the debut of the great legend of the surf of the Pacific Ocean. 

The Belking’s -the name came to them through a brand of whiskey called Belkin- bequeathed a handful of singles and LPs that, if listened to chronologically, reveal an evolution and maturity that, to my liking, places them even ahead of their first masters, Shadows and the Ventures. In their worst moments they were environmental music for a chifa, but in the brilliant end of their career they came to fuse rock, rhythm & blues, jazz and tropical music, always maintaining coherence and playing their pop crafts - songs that they said a lot without almost using the word-with delicacy, feeling and claw. 
The heart of the group was formed by Raúl Herrera in the first and Wilfredo Sandoval in the rhythmic guitar. Both are the only fixed members of the band throughout its long history dotted with constant changes in the rhythmic base. They were neighbors of Lince and students of the Great School Unit Melitón Carvajal. Wilfredo, however, was the first Belking. In 1963 he began to rehearse with friends from the neighborhood called Alberto Sánchez, Jorge Mosqueira and Jorge Sánchez. Seeing the interest of Wilfredo, who was an only child, his mother put him a guitar teacher and allowed the band to rehearse in his apartment. Little by little the other members of the group deserted due to lack of interest and personal reasons. A few days later, the teacher was also fired because his repertoire was basically Creole music. It was then the solitary self-taught passion. Wilfredo bought a record player and a Punto Azul radio that he connected to listen to the music he liked. He had, among other recordings, an LP of several artists that featured a theme of the Ventures called Driving guitars and a disc of the Beach Boys. At first his mother got him a national electric guitar brand La Rosa. Seeing that he was moving quickly with his apprenticeship, they soon gave him new equipment: a Phillips radio that served him as an amplifier and a Fender guitar, with which he imitated exactly the sound of his records. an LP of several artists that featured a theme of the Ventures called Driving guitars and a disc of the Beach Boys. At first his mother got him a national electric guitar brand La Rosa. Seeing that he was moving quickly with his apprenticeship, they soon gave him new equipment: a Phillips radio that served him as an amplifier and a Fender guitar, with which he imitated exactly the sound of his records. an LP of several artists that featured a theme of the Ventures called Driving guitars and a disc of the Beach Boys. At first his mother got him a national electric guitar brand La Rosa. Seeing that he was moving quickly with his apprenticeship, they soon gave him new equipment: a Phillips radio that served him as an amplifier and a Fender guitar, with which he imitated exactly the sound of his records. 
The history of the Belkings really began in a meeting in August 1964 when the guitarists Wilfredo Sandoval and Raúl Herrera met. Wilfredo invited to his house a saxophonist and a drummer of the estudiantina of the school and a friend of the neighborhood that played piano. Raúl Herrera, who had not been invited but wanted to play, arrived with his classmates. Wilfredo had seen him in some musical performances at the Melitón, but they had not gotten more involved because one studied commercial secondary and the other common high school with a specialty in science, so his classrooms gave to different courtyards. When they started making music they were joined by a strong telepathic current. A friendship was born and one of the most solid creative couples of instrumental rock. 
Already armed the core of the band began rehearsals. At first they played with a drummer nicknamed “Colía”, who defected but introduced them to his cousin, a percussionist nicknamed “Kiko la serie”, who in turn got them to play the bass. The bassist was a boy of Chinese origin nicknamed Nico, an outlaw who was fingernail and meat with “Kiko The series”. Both were older than Raúl and Wilfredo. With this training they debuted in a morning at the cinema Riva Agüero and several nights were presented in the teen danzant of a night club called Tábaris, doing covers of the Ventures. The bohemian atmosphere scared schoolchildren Raul and Wilfredo a little, who ended up separating themselves from the rhythmic base because they did not want to lead a life too messy. 
Raul and Wilfredo continued rehearsing alone. They began to play songs by Dave Clark Five and The Animals accompanied by a singer named Emilio Zavala, who left the group because he had to prepare to apply for college. To take his place, he recommended his cousin, a Beatles fan named Daniel Rosario. But there was still a drummer missing. Then Raul called to touch a Nikkei boy from his high school class at the school called Walter Aray Nozawa, who had a tarola and played in the war band. Walter joined the group and became a percussionist so interested in progress that his older brother came to give him a battery. The new formation was completed by a 13-year-old boy named José Olivera, nicknamed Magoo for his thick glasses. Despite the age difference was very hard. He already smoked tobacco and lived half a block from the house of Pancho Guevara, drummer of Los Saicos, in Lince. He bought a bass guitar and disarmed a radio to build his amplifier with Celestión brand speakers. His uniform at that time were lucuma-colored sacks with a distinctive crown type that Wilfredo’s mother had purchased in installments at the Mister store. Daniel Rosario dyed yellow mamey shirts. The tie was black and with a thick heart. They all wore black pants and wore shoes of the same color. His uniform at that time were lucuma-colored sacks with a distinctive crown type that Wilfredo’s mother had purchased in installments at the Mister store. Daniel Rosario dyed yellow mamey shirts. The tie was black and with a thick heart. They all wore black pants and wore shoes of the same color. His uniform at that time were lucuma-colored sacks with a distinctive crown type that Wilfredo’s mother had purchased in installments at the Mister store. Daniel Rosario dyed yellow mamey shirts. The tie was black and with a thick heart. They all wore black pants and wore shoes of the same color. 
Then came the summer of 1965, when the Belking’s ascended to the heights. A colleague from the neighborhood who served as manager, Olín Benavides, got them a contract to play at a theater in the city of Tarma during the carnival. Raul, Wilfredo, Magoo and Walter tried with enthusiasm and prepared the trip to the center of the Andes. It would be his first tour to the provinces. Walter Aray’s parents were very worried because his son suffered from asthma, but they were persuaded to give him permission because the mountain range has a dry climate. The concert for the Tarma carnivals went so well that a local radio station hired them to play longer. Thus, what started as a round trip ended up lasting for a few weeks. 
Upon their return from the tour they began to perform at Sergio’s show, led by Chilean DJ Sergio Vergara, first on Radio Victoria and then on television. For two months his visits were constant. They once accompanied the Brazilian singer Sergio Murillo, who was quite successful at the time. They also performed with the 007 group, which had a young bassist who will soon reappear in this story: Luis Pacora Rojas. 
At the beginning of 1966 José “Magoo” Olivera -chibolo malleable and volatile but with too much difference in age with the rest of the musicians- stopped going to the rehearsals. He was immediately replaced by another student of the Melitón, a thin Chinese with polarized glasses known as Jerry Lam, a much better instrumentalist and with greater musical culture. Jerome Franklin Lam Cam was born in Hong Kong and was an English citizen. When he went to live in Peru his family settled in Chinatown. Thanks to his trips to London he managed to have a good collection of records. He became known in the Melitón for the bravado of refusing to sing the National Anthem, with the excuse that he was a British citizen. He had good chemistry and understanding with the boys. As a group they had an absolutely coherent image: the Peruvian is ancestrally oriental, the two ends of the Pacific Ocean have strange underground connections. Who knows if that is why the “Creole Chinese” -currently there should be about three million in Peru- adapts so well to the neighborhood. 
With this formation the takeoff began. At the beginning of the great adventure there is a morning in 1966. A full movie idol of Pueblo Libre witnessed one of the best performances of Los Belking’s. They were super-square, after having rehearsed and performed concerts for approximately two years. The audience responded by rising euphorically from their seats to applaud after each song. His repertoire were instrumental themes interspersed with covers sung by Daniel Rosario. At the end of the performance, while they were packing their instruments, they were approached by a man in a suit who introduced himself as a radio DJ at Radio Atalaya. He was Gustavo Galliani and he wanted to be his representative. He had enough contacts and offered to mold them and help them to make a much more professional career. Until then, the manager functions were fulfilled by Olín Benavides, a leg of the neighborhood who did what he could, so they accepted his offer. Galliani’s first suggestion was to recommend that they become only an instrumental group. Obedient but aware of their own advantages, the boys immediately expelled Daniel Rosario. They defined their concept with the ellipsis of the word and their career was uphill. Daniel Rosario, meanwhile, was stung by his expulsion from the group, but his reaction was positive in the long run. He began to learn to play guitar and became an exemplary instrumentalist. Galliani also helped them by giving them the voice of new opportunities. Galliani’s first suggestion was to recommend that they become only an instrumental group. Obedient but aware of their own advantages, the boys immediately expelled Daniel Rosario. They defined their concept with the ellipsis of the word and their career was uphill. Daniel Rosario, meanwhile, was stung by his expulsion from the group, but his reaction was positive in the long run. He began to learn to play guitar and became an exemplary instrumentalist. Galliani also helped them by giving them the voice of new opportunities. Galliani’s first suggestion was to recommend that they become only an instrumental group. Obedient but aware of their own advantages, the boys immediately expelled Daniel Rosario. They defined their concept with the ellipsis of the word and their career was uphill. Daniel Rosario, meanwhile, was stung by his expulsion from the group, but his reaction was positive in the long run. He began to learn to play guitar and became an exemplary instrumentalist. Galliani also helped them by giving them the voice of new opportunities. Daniel Rosario, meanwhile, was stung by his expulsion from the group, but his reaction was positive in the long run. He began to learn to play guitar and became an exemplary instrumentalist. Galliani also helped them by giving them the voice of new opportunities. Daniel Rosario, meanwhile, was stung by his expulsion from the group, but his reaction was positive in the long run. He began to learn to play guitar and became an exemplary instrumentalist. Galliani also helped them by giving them the voice of new opportunities. 
In November 1966 the Viceroy, through his head of promotion and also discjockey Víctor Cáceres Fuentes organized a contest at the Tauro Cinema. The band that won could record a 45 RPM record with the record company. After a hard-fought competition, the Belking’s were declared winners. In December of that same year they finished the school and began their first recordings, consisting of four 45s composed only of versions. 
In January of 1967, while they were preparing to apply to the university, Los Belking’s brought out their first 45, which contained the songs El Guazón and La Playa. Laughter at the beginning of the first theme belonged to Gustavo Galliani. On La Playa they had as special guest David Lam - Jerry’s cousin - on the Hawaiian guitar. You could already see his particular groove, his concern for the arrangements, the atmospheres and the crystalline sound of his guitars. The simple one soon arrived at the first places in the radios, reason why The Viceroy asked them to return immediately to the recording studio. 
The result was his second 45, with the songs Black is black and Tema for young people in love. Negro es Negro is a surf version of the international success of the Spanish group Los Bravos. Theme for Enamored Youth, on the other hand, was an original composition by Bob Welch, of the Shadows. His version, with creative arrangements of his own harvest, became a local event, partly due to the great feeling that Raul Herrera distilled in the first guitar. Years later several rockers remembered her as an important part of the sound of the 60s in Peru. Theme for Enamored Youngsters came to their ears because Walter Aray’s uncle had gone to the carnival in Rio de Janeiro and brought them the album. 
In the summer of 1967 Wilfredo met a quiet young man with glasses, a regular at the Santa Rosa Meryknoll parish, called Andrés Roque Palma. The contact had been Roger Flores, a friend who played second guitar in Los Zany’s, another band of Lince. The first time that Wilfredo saw Andrés Roque, he was at the door of his house playing on the acoustic guitar, his own songs such as Bólido de Fuego, Funerales and Ilusiónate Chica. He was impressed by Andrés’ melodic talent and recruited him to go to the band’s rehearsals and show them the songs. He soon became a mastermind behind the whole concept, since his collaboration in the composition of his own subjects and in the arrangements was decisive. The fifth Belking had been incorporated, the one that never played on any disc, the silent Belking. 
In April of 1967 Wilfredo had entered the university, but he also went to work in an import house of radio parts and pieces. Without losing the opportunity, he suggested to the owner that he import instruments and musical equipment. That way the Belkings could complete their arsenal: a Vox amplifier, a Mustang Fender guitar, a Dynacord effects box, an amplifier and a Teisco guitar, a Bassman Fender amplifier, a Hoffner bass and a Roxy battery. With the new technology in their hands, they began experimenting with psychedelia -although never grandiloquently- and quickly recorded their third and fourth 45: Pushing Strong / The Pipe of Peace and Psychedelic Thesis / Love is sad. In none of these recordings was there interference by El Virrey, that gave them creative freedom while they continued being successful and offered them the possibility of recording a first LP immediately. They were on the crest of the wave. 
The LP “The sound of the Belking’s”, recorded in mid-1967, when San Francisco lived the Summer of Love and they the mediocre winter of Lima-fact that did not prevent the album was ideal to listen to a day of surfing in the Waikiki club -, contains the three songs of Andrés Roque that Wilfredo heard when he met him and the first songs recorded by the group. Andrés Roque’s material highlights Bolido de Fuego - powerful instrumental for driving a car at high speed - and Ilusiónate Chica, a delicate pop craft where melody and strength come together with the cement of a tremendous musical imagination. Both songs do not reach two and a half minutes. Raúl Herrera, on the other hand, is the author of four themes: Te Vi Llorar, Concentration Camp, RCM, and Quién Vive. This last song begins with Walter Aray screaming the title ,. Paradox sad: Aray died of asthma in 1986. Wilfredo Sandoval signed only the dramatic Condenado a Muerte, ideal song to open a spaguetti western. The album also includes a slower re-recording of its classic theme for Young Lovers and versions of Dead Leaves, Freeway and Happy by your Side. The latter is a traditional Chinese song, and is a response to an instrumental theme recorded by the Doltons on their first LP. The voices in Feliz a tu Lado are by Jerry Lam Cam and Walter Aray Nozawa, in one of the few interventions of the human voice on a Belking album. The album also includes a slower re-recording of its classic theme for Young Lovers and versions of Dead Leaves, Freeway and Happy by your Side. The latter is a traditional Chinese song, and is a response to an instrumental theme recorded by the Doltons on their first LP. The voices in Feliz a tu Lado are by Jerry Lam Cam and Walter Aray Nozawa, in one of the few interventions of the human voice on a Belking album. The album also includes a slower re-recording of its classic theme for Young Lovers and versions of Dead Leaves, Freeway and Happy by your Side. The latter is a traditional Chinese song, and is a response to an instrumental theme recorded by the Doltons on their first LP. The voices in Feliz a tu Lado are by Jerry Lam Cam and Walter Aray Nozawa, in one of the few interventions of the human voice on a Belking album. 
The LP was a sales event. It had a first print run of 10,000 copies in the first month and the record company took the opportunity to edit a 45 with songs taken from the album: Bólido de Fuego / Hojas muertas. The group was requested by everybody, to the point of exhausting its members with so much morning, presentation in local and in programs of channel 4. The prolific of its creativity in that moment is implausible, since at the same time the members of the band also studied and / or worked. In those days they also accepted a proposal by Gustavo Galliani and recorded a 45 with another of his proteges: Kela Gates. The single was made up of Summer Nectar - a song by Nancy Sinatra with lyrics adapted to Castilian by Kela - and I will reach you, with lyrics by Andrés Roque on the American original. 
In late 1967 Jerry Lam Cam retired from the group to form The Dragons along with former vocalist Daniel Rosario, his cousin David Lam, and his brother just arrived from Hong Kong. We’ll meet Jerry soon after at the origin of Telegraph Avenue. The Belking’s covered his post with Luis Pacora Rojas, a former 007 who had met two years ago at El Show de Sergio. 
Lucho Pacora quickly joined the band, which already had a contract to record a second album. The press and the public had put a lot of hope in the group, so Gustavo Galliani suggested that they collaborate with the National Symphony Orchestra for the LP they were about to record. He had an arranger friend who had the pseudonym Andres D'Colbert - the boys never knew his real name - and he called him to make the arrangements for the orchestra. D'Colbert learned on guitar what Wilfredo hummed and then passed the music to a friend who wrote the scores. Meanwhile, the band began to rehearse, to compose and to select new material. His second LP, released in 1968 and called simply “The Belking’s” is made up of nine own songs and three versions, two of them instrumentations of songs originally sung. The recordings with the National Symphony Orchestra were so fluid that they needed very few shots to make the songs look good. An Argentine cellist surnamed Robatti who played with the orchestra was impressed because the boys did not get out of control in any of the bars: Che, how can they be so good and not know music. The Belking’s were very flattered by this eulogy coming from an academic musician and they responded that they only played with the feeling, an argument that used to be given by all the great musicians of the 60s. An Argentine cellist surnamed Robatti who played with the orchestra was impressed because the boys did not get out of control in any of the bars: Che, how can they be so good and not know music. The Belking’s were very flattered by this eulogy coming from an academic musician and they responded that they only played with the feeling, an argument that used to be given by all the great musicians of the 60s. An Argentine cellist surnamed Robatti who played with the orchestra was impressed because the boys did not get out of control in any of the bars: Che, how can they be so good and not know music. The Belking’s were very flattered by this eulogy coming from an academic musician and they responded that they only played with the feeling, an argument that used to be given by all the great musicians of the 60s. 
Although the second LP did not sell as much as its previous albums, there are songs that deserve some comments. “Phi Fenómeno” is a song signed by the 4 Belking’s and Richard Araníbar, and is one of the best samples of psychedelia and of creative use of the studio by a Peruvian band. Amor Imposible, on the other hand, is a dramatic and sweet song by Andrés Roque in which the strings of the National Symphony Orchestra participate. It provoked reactions found at the beginning, since Wilfredo considered that the title was very trite. Andrés Roque remained in his thirteenth and said that if they did not like the title he would not allow the song to come out. They accepted reluctantly. Later they learned that the name was for a girl in love with a friend of Andres: it was a case of autobiographical melody. Channel 5 used this theme for four years as a musical background to announce some programs. Playboy, on the other hand, is a composition of Gene Thomas originally sung. In the song they used the string section of the symphony and Wilfredo rehearsed a slide with his school promotion ring. The rock jewel is Séptima Patrol, title inspired by the television series Youth Patrol. Luis Pacora joined as a composer in two songs: La Lluvia de tus Ojos and Aurora, dedicated to the girl who would later become his wife. Shortly thereafter they recorded their second 45 with Kela Gates, containing the themes Al Maestro with Cariño y Loca por un Loco. In the song they used the string section of the symphony and Wilfredo rehearsed a slide with his school promotion ring. The rock jewel is Séptima Patrol, title inspired by the television series Youth Patrol. Luis Pacora joined as a composer in two songs: La Lluvia de tus Ojos and Aurora, dedicated to the girl who would later become his wife. Shortly thereafter they recorded their second 45 with Kela Gates, containing the themes Al Maestro with Cariño y Loca por un Loco. In the song they used the string section of the symphony and Wilfredo rehearsed a slide with his school promotion ring. The rock jewel is Séptima Patrol, title inspired by the television series Youth Patrol. Luis Pacora joined as a composer in two songs: La Lluvia de tus Ojos and Aurora, dedicated to the girl who would later become his wife. Shortly thereafter they recorded their second 45 with Kela Gates, containing the themes Al Maestro with Cariño y Loca por un Loco. 
At the beginning of 1969 they released their third LP: Los Fabulosos Belking’s, consisting of seven own songs and five covers (four of which were originally sung). The singer-songwriter Daniel “Kiri” Escobar signed one of his own songs: Debo Alejarme de ti. Andrés D'Colbert collaborated with the instrumentation of four subjects. Two compositions by Wilfredo stood out: the epic Corazón de Bronce and the very fine Music for Flowers; instrumental songs that, if the listener is imaginative, say as much as a story or a novel. The tarantinesca Okinawa 2000 is a composition of Raúl, but the title was suggested by Walter Aray, because that is the date on which the Americans would return the island of Okinawa to Japan. That same year the label released an EP with 4 songs extracted from the first three LPs of the band: 
The LP Los Fabulosos Belking’s left a bitter taste in the members of the band, who were not satisfied with the results. Again, the rhythmic base defected, but this time the wound was more painful, because they were a well communicated musical team. Luis Pacora had stopped going to the rehearsals for personal problems: the parents of Aurora, his girlfriend, did not want him to visit her, so they were hiding. Sometimes, she brought him chocolate cake, which inspired one of the last collaborations in Pacora’s composition with Los Belking’s. Walter Aray also left the ship due to complications with asthma. 
In the summer of 1969 Raul and Wilfredo were once again alone, but they did not hesitate to close themselves in the studio. They recorded again Como Como Eres and Okinawa 2000, this time with the collaboration of the Barreda brothers, then the rhythmic base of The (St. Thomas) Pepper Smelter. Rossi Urbina, from the Las Midems group - whom they knew from the Santa Rosa Meryknoll parish, where Andrés Roque stopped - took part in the choirs with his siren voice. The other voices of Las Midens belonged to Hortensia Manrique and Susana Calixto. Under the tutelage of Los Belking’s, Las Midens recorded the song Dispárale Nena, for the DO RE MI label. As you are / Okinawa 2000 went on sale at the end of March 1969 and was placed in the first places of sales. The difference was noticeable in relation to the versions appeared in the LP. In the opinion of the members of the group, they should have re-recorded many more songs. These days they were also supporting band in Kela Gates’ first LP, which contained 12 songs. Andrés Roque made the letters adapting them from the original English to Spanish. The pianist Víctor Cuadros collaborated in the arrangements. On the Kela album, the vocal group Las Midens also performed the choirs. 
At the end of 1969, Peru already clearly noted the policies of the nationalist revolution of General Juan Velasco Alvarado. The musicians felt that an era was coming to an end when the military decreed the end of the morning and had to look for performances in other types of events. From this moment on, the Belking’s tried to resist by organizing recitals in mass venues such as sports coliseums or discotheques, both in Lima and in the provinces. But the performances were becoming more and more spaced due to the magnitude of the events. 
In November of the 69 the Belkings had already spent more than five months away from the music scene due to problems of international royalties with El Virrey. The Barreda brothers could not continue with them because their official group was The (St Thomas) Pepper Smelter and had agreed commitments. They then incorporated Fernando Bolarte as a new drummer, who was free because Los Dolton’s had just separated. His new bassist was a stranger in the music scene called Luis Arroyo. Gustavo Galliani, for his part, also had to leave aside his work as a representative because he had other family and work obligations. He had left his musical seed. In addition to Kela Gates and Los Belking’s he represented Compay Quinto, an artist who played cumbia and Latin music and who would have quite an influence on the musical future of the band, who was increasingly interested in fusion with Latin jazz and rhythm & blues. At that time Wilfredo and Raúl listened to bands like Chicago and Blood, Sweat & Tears. Before the desertion of Galliani, Wilfredo -when he was 21 years old and older- assumed the role of representative in front of the record company and the show businessmen. 
After a few months of rehearsals, the band’s new band recorded in 1970 a homonymous miniplay with six songs: Atajame, Sentimientos, Sendas de Amor, Let Me, Sad Solitude and Charly. It would be his penultimate recording. He has the most energy from his records. His interest in fusion with Latin rhythms is clear. They counted on the collaboration of Víctor Cuadros in the arrangements and Las Midens in the choirs. The wind instruments give the miniplay a force that had not had the recordings of the band until then. They were at their best, they were making their best music, but as often happens in this story, they were at the right time, but in the wrong place. 
At that time the members of the group worked, went to university and had performances in venues such as Pussycat, from 11:30 at night until 2:30 in the morning. The natural thing was that they directed their energies towards other directions. Then they were victims of exhaustion. Wilfredo began to have problems with the spine and had to rest. They again had differences with El Virrey for late payment of royalties for sales abroad. The death of Wilfredo’s father also influenced the silence of the band. 
By the end of 1972, Wilfredo could walk with the proper precautions. Throughout his life he should perform exercises for the spine and maintain a relaxed regime. Wanting to return to music, he joined again with Raúl Herrera and hired with his money a few hours of recording in the recording studios of El Virrey, becoming something unexpected for the time: an independent producer. Of these sessions would be the songs Popeye the Woodcutter and Symphony for a Tomorrow, then included in his 1973 album. In the studio they counted again with the collaboration of the Barreda brothers in the rhythm base. When the Viceroy learned that the Belkings had come back together and were recording, he called them to begin negotiations and see the possibility of releasing a new LP. Everything was very good, but if the Belking’s came together again they needed a new bassist and drummer, since the Barreda brothers were only doing them a favor and they needed musicians to perform live again. That is how they incorporated Freddy “Puro” Fuentes Aranda, former neighbor of “Liverpool chico” and member of La Nueva Cosecha. They had met him at a concert in Chimbote where he played with the Yorks, replacing the official drummer, in an absolutely delirious concert as the audience protested loudly for the absence of the original members. In the bass they incorporated a virtuous boy who came to play salsa called Juan Carlos Cubas. That is how they incorporated Freddy “Puro” Fuentes Aranda, former neighbor of “Liverpool chico” and member of La Nueva Cosecha. They had met him at a concert in Chimbote where he played with the Yorks, replacing the official drummer, in an absolutely delirious concert as the audience protested loudly for the absence of the original members. In the bass they incorporated a virtuous boy who came to play salsa called Juan Carlos Cubas. That is how they incorporated Freddy “Puro” Fuentes Aranda, former neighbor of “Liverpool chico” and member of La Nueva Cosecha. They had met him at a concert in Chimbote where he played with the Yorks, replacing the official drummer, in an absolutely delirious concert as the audience protested loudly for the absence of the original members. In the bass they incorporated a virtuous boy who came to play salsa called Juan Carlos Cubas. 
Shortly before recording their swan song, the LP Yesterday and Today, they were invited to Cuzco to play by the students of a school in the city. The prohibition to touch was for the cinemas, but not for the classrooms of a school, and in the place did not enter nor a needle. Inspired by the atmosphere of the imperial city, they composed a theme with certain Andean airs: Oriundo Capitán. The arrangements of the Yesterday and Today are the work of Víctor Cuadros. They also included the song Años Cruentos, a medley of their best known songs with a narration in the voice of Gerardo Manuel. Although the album was the best they had ever released, sales were scarce. The first rock scene in Peru had suddenly disappeared and only gave its last shrieks. Raul and Wilfredo opted to leave the band in a suspense that ultimately lasted thirty years. 
In 2003 the Spanish label Nuevos Medios released a compilation of Los Belking’s entitled Instrumental Waves, which had an unexpected international success. The group returned to the stages and resumed the work where it had left it. 
Although they were born almost at the same time as Los Saicos, Los Golden Boys, Los Shain’s, and Los Dolton’s - bands that gave the starting signal in the 1965 foundational and garagero, the long history of the Belking’s prefigures the whole story of the first Rock scene in Peru. From 1966 the scene grew and diversified, influenced by psychedelia and the spread of the new sound of English bands. Telling this story is like entering a kaleidoscope of electricity. It was as if the rock had suddenly entered adolescence and swallowed an acid. It was then when, in the eyes of the 60’s generation - the generation of the classical counterculture and the second avant-garde, the generation that changed the world - suddenly appeared a multicolored plain……by….By Carlos Torres Rotondo ….~

Willy Sandoval (Rhythm Guitar) 
Raúl Herrera (Guitar) 
Nico (Low) 
Emilio Zavala (Voice) 
Kiko The Series (Battery)


Tracklist 
A1 Crisol
A2 Puente Medianoche
A3 Sabor Dulce
A4 Popeye El Leñador
A5 Umbral De Amor
A6 Años Cruentos
B1 Proteo El Pastor
B2 Sinfonia Para Una Mañana
B3 Pequeñita
B4 Familia 4
B5 Oriundo Capitan
B6 Sabata 

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