Saturday, 30 June 2018

Manduka (Congregacion & Los Jaivas members) “Manduka” 1972 Brazil-Chile Psych Folk Rock


Manduka (Congregacion & Los Jaivas members) “Manduka” 1972 Brazil-Chile ultra rare Psych Folk Rock 
full vk
full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/32pWRGAOAbNujk6ZmjM84N

full deezer

https://www.deezer.com/en/album/14837747


It may come as a surprise to many to know that the psychedelic rock and folk movement of 
the late 60s and early70s was not confined to the USA and Europe. In fact, the massivecultural upheavals of the 1960s had spread far and wide and by 1967-68, musicians, artistsand writers across the world were exploring new ways to express themselves. This was noless the case in South America and it was during the late 60s and early 70s that an explosion of psych rock and folk produced amazing music that still inspires half a century 
later. The most well-known and celebrated South American movement from this era was Tropicália (also known as Tropicalismo), a Brazilian artistic movement that arose in the late 1960s that embraced music, poetry, visual arts and theatre. 

Musicians who were part of the movement include Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Os Mutantes, Gal Costa, and Tom Zé. But it wasn’t just Brazil that experienced a flowering of artistic freedom. Chile too had a movement called la Nueva Canción Chilena (Chilean New Song), a movement that captivated and elated a country during a period of social change. This was a powerful musical style that combined poetic lyrics with a haunting mix of traditional native wind and stringed instruments. It was born of and expressed the aspirations of a rising social class 
and political consciousness concerned with social justice and freedom. It was a time in which psychedelic rock and folk bands of the late ’60s and early ’70s like Los Blops, Los Jaivas, Aguaturbia, El Congreso, and Congregación mixed American and European rock with native Chilean and other South American forms. However, by 1973, the creative freedoms expressed by Chilean musicians, poets, writers and artists was abruptly curtailed 
when there was a violent CIA-backed military coup that overthrew the socialist government of Salvador Allende and installed the fascist dictator General Augusto Pinochet. The event caused many leading figures of the political opposition to be arrested, imprisoned and tortured. Thousands disappeared and were killed. In the context of such violent suppression and intimidation, many musicians sought asylum in neighbouring countries or 
even further afield, like the USA or Europe. One such musician and writer was Alexandre Manuel Thiago de Mello, otherwise known as Manduka. 

Manduka was born in 1952 in Brasil, the son of the journalist Pomona Politis and the poet Thiago de Mello, and nephew of the musician Gaudêncio Thiago de Mello. At the age of 18 he moved with his family to Chile, ostensibly to escape the increasingly oppressive atmosphere of the military government in Brazil. Just as many members and supporters of the New Chilean Song movement would soon go into exile after the 1973 coup, Manduka had escaped one 
dictatorship in Brazil to go and live in Chile, very soon to experience its own military 
crackdown. Manduka became involved with the Unidad Popular, a left-wing political 
alliance in Chile that stood behind the successful candidacy of Salvador Allende in the 1970 Chilean presidential election. During this time, Manduka also established close ties with important Chilean artists and began to foster interesting musical ideas, mixing his Brazilian heritage with the Chilean culture he found himself rapidly absorbing. In 1971, Manduka was still only nineteen years old and he was already a leading figure in the local left intelligentsia (his father was very close to notable figures such as Pablo Neruda and Violeta 
Parra, a musician who set the foundation for Nueva Canción Chilena) and was close to other exiled Brazilians, particularly the singer-songwriter Geraldo Vandré. It was with Vandré that Manduka co-wrote his first songs, quickly making a name for himself with ‘Patria Amada Idolatrada Salve Salve’, sung by Venezuelan singer Soledad Bravo, winning a prize at the 1972 Festival of Aguadulce, held in Peru. Upon his return to Chile, Manduka 
received an offer from Julio Numhauser to record a record. Numhauser was a key member of the Nueva Canción Chilena movement and founder member of the influential folk music groups Quilapayún. He was also artistic director of the IRT label and the result was an LP composed almost entirely by Manduka, with songs and improvisations that, somewhat inevitably, alluded to exile, Brazilian history and his own encounters with Chilean culture. 
The resulting album, 'Manduka’ was released in 1972 and featured vocalist Soledad Bravo along with contributions from some of the leading progressive folk and rock musicians in Chile at the time including Numhauser himself, Patricio Castillo (a close friend and creative partner of political activist, poet and singer Victor Jara), Baltasar Villaseca of leading Chilean psych folkrock group Congregación, and the brothers Gabriel and Eduardo Parra, 
from popular folk rock group Los Jaivas. The album is a wonderfully fresh and exciting collection of sounds that fizz with energy and hope; one minute a lilting folk ballad, the next an up tempo foot stomping attack on the acoustic guitar. It is the sound of a creative mind at the centre of a flourishing artistic movement just months away from being crushed. 

After the coup in September 1973, many of the leading figures in the Chilean music scene fled for their lives. Those that stayed payed a heavy price. An associate of Manduka, Victor Jara, was a key figure in the Nueva Canción Chilena movement. Soon after the coup, he was arrested and tortured. The guards smashed his hands and fingers, and then mocked him by asking him to play the guitar. He was then killed with a bullet to the head, and his corpse riddled with more than 40 bullets wounds. His body was put on display at a sports 
stadium as a warning then thrown out on the street of a Santiago shantytown. The stark contrast between the themes of his songs— love, peace, and social justice—and the brutal way in which he was murdered transformed Jara into a potent symbol of struggle for human rights and justice for those murdered during the Pinochet regime. This was the political context in which Manduka found himself and he had no choice but to flee to 
Argentina with members of Los Jaivas. In the years that followed, Manduka would continue 
to wander the world, living and working in Venezuela, Germany, France, Spain and Mexico, publishing records and books, scoring films, and collaborating with artists such as Naná Vasconcelos and Pablo Milanés. Manduka returned to Brazil in 1988 where he remained until his death on October 17, 2004, due to cardiovascular complications…..~


Deep within the gulags of the New World Order, a few hapless souls reassert their humanity by banging their shoes in time with a makeshift guitar, the proclamations of a poet reminding them what it means to be free, while the daily bugle marking the latest execution echoes in the distance…..by…Phallus Dei …..~


Incredibly soothing and wonderful album. Mostly acoustic guitar, some psychedelic flutes and percussion, a bit of female vocal support. At times, it sounds like it has been made in heaven (Patria Amada Idolatrada Salve Salve). 
Unluckily the sound quality is rather poor. (I suppose that the lo-fi sound is due to a low quality rip from old vinyl). Still very highly recommended. Someone re-release this please!…..~


Alexandre Manuel Thiago de Mello, better known as Manduka, was a Brazilian composer, singer and plastic artist born in Petrópolis on February 21, 1952 and died in the city of Rio de Janeiro in October 2004. 
Having traveled to Chile at the age of 18 and being influenced by the country’s culture, he met in the city of Santiago the composer Geraldo Vandré with whom he made some partnerships. It was in the voice of singer Soledad Bravo that one of these compositions with Vandré won a festival held in the capital of Peru called Aguadulce in the year 1972. 
It was also this year that Manduka released on IRT his first solo album, the self-titled Manduka , which eventually became known as Brazil 1500 because of its beautiful opening track with more than 10 minutes of duration. In the album, Manduka shares the voices with Soledad Bravo and the guitars with Baltasar, from the Chilean band Congregación . Pato and Julio, from the band Amerindios , respectively, sign the flute / charango and the harmonica and Gabriel and Eduardo, from the band Los Jaivas , are responsible for the tumbadora and the bongo.In Brazil 1500 , we see the influence of Andean instruments without losing the Brazilian ginga and a poetic that presents us a composer that shows the difficulties of being away from his native land. It is also worth remembering that in this Spotify playlist there is an error in the order of the songs: The track Brazil 1500 (not called ” Brazil 1950 “) is the one that opens the album and not the last one of the album, as can be seen in image of the end of this post. 
From the album, I highlight the tracks: Brasil 1500 , Entra y Salva , De la Tierra , Patria Amada Idolatrada Salve Salve , From A Foreigner and What the Holy Father Will Say ……~


Notes: It may come as a surprise to many to know that the psychedelic rock and folk movement of the late 60s and early70s was not confined to the USA and Europe. In fact, the massive cultural upheavals of the 1960s had spread far and wide and by 1967-68, musicians, artists and writers across the world were exploring new ways to express themselves. This was no less the case in South America and it was during the late 60s and early 70s that an explosion of psych rock and folk produced amazing music that still inspires half a century later. The most well-known and celebrated South American movement from this era was Tropicália (also known as Tropicalismo), a Brazilian artistic movement that arose in the late 1960s that embraced music, poetry, visual arts and theatre. Musicians who were part of the movement include Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, Os Mutantes, Gal Costa, and Tom Zé. But it wasn’t just Brazil that experienced a flowering of artistic freedom. Chile too had a movement called la Nueva Canción Chilena (Chilean New Song), a movement that captivated and elated a country during a period of social change. This was a powerful musical style that combined poetic lyrics with a haunting mix of traditional native wind and stringed instruments. It was born of and expressed the aspirations of a rising social class and political consciousness concerned with social justice and freedom. It was a time in which psychedelic rock and folk bands of the late ’60s and early ’70s like Los Blops, Los Jaivas, Aguaturbia, El Congreso, and Congregación mixed American and European rock with native Chilean and other South American forms. However, by 1973, the creative freedoms expressed by Chilean musicians, poets, writers and artists was abruptly curtailed when there was a violent CIA-backed military coup that overthrew the socialist government of Salvador Allende and installed the fascist dictator General Augusto Pinochet. The event caused many leading figures of the political opposition to be arrested, imprisoned and tortured. Thousands disappeared and were killed. In the context of such violent suppression and intimidation, many musicians sought asylum in neighbouring countries or even further afield, like the USA or Europe. One such musician and writer was Alexandre Manuel Thiago de Mello, otherwise known as Manduka. Manduka was born in 1952 in Brasil, the son of the journalist Pomona Politis and the poet Thiago de Mello, and nephew of the musician Gaudêncio Thiago de Mello. At the age of 18 he moved with his family to Chile, ostensibly to escape the increasingly oppressive atmosphere of the military government in Brazil. Just as many members and supporters of the New Chilean Song movement would soon go into exile after the 1973 coup, Manduka had escaped one dictatorship in Brazil to go and live in Chile, very soon to experience its own military crackdown. Manduka became involved with the Unidad Popular, a left-wing political alliance in Chile that stood behind the successful candidacy of Salvador Allende in the 1970 Chilean presidential election. During this time, Manduka also established close ties with important Chilean artists and began to foster interesting musical ideas, mixing his Brazilian heritage with the Chilean culture he found himself rapidly absorbing. In 1971, Manduka was still only nineteen years old and he was already a leading figure in the local left intelligentsia (his father was very close to notable figures such as Pablo Neruda and Violeta Parra, a musician who set the foundation for Nueva Canción Chilena) and was close to other exiled Brazilians, particularly the singer-songwriter Geraldo Vandré. It was with Vandré that Manduka co-wrote his first songs, quickly making a name for himself with ‘Patria Amada Idolatrada Salve Salve’, sung by Venezuelan singer Soledad Bravo, winning a prize at the 1972 Festival of Aguadulce, held in Peru. Upon his return to Chile, Manduka received an offer from Julio Numhauser to record a record. Numhauser was a key member of the Nueva Canción Chilena movement and founder member of the influential folk music groups Quilapayún. He was also artistic director of the IRT label and the result was an LP composed almost entirely by Manduka, with songs and improvisations that, somewhat inevitably, alluded to exile, Brazilian history and his own encounters with Chilean culture. The resulting album, 'Manduka’ was released in 1972 and featured vocalist Soledad Bravo along with contributions from some of the leading progressive folk and rock musicians in Chile at the time including Numhauser himself, Patricio Castillo (a close friend and creative partner of political activist, poet and singer Victor Jara), Baltasar Villaseca of leading Chilean psych folkrock group Congregación, and the brothers Gabriel and Eduardo Parra, from popular folk rock group Los Jaivas. The album is a wonderfully fresh and exciting collection of sounds that fizz with energy and hope; one minute a lilting folk ballad, the next an up tempo foot stomping attack on the acoustic guitar. It is the sound of a creative mind at the centre of a flourishing artistic movement just months away from being crushed. After the coup in September 1973, many of the leading figures in the Chilean music scene fled for their lives. Those that stayed payed a heavy price. An associate of Manduka, Victor Jara, was a key figure in the Nueva Canción Chilena movement. Soon after the coup, he was arrested and tortured. The guards smashed his hands and fingers, and then mocked him by asking him to play the guitar. He was then killed with a bullet to the head, and his corpse riddled with more than 40 bullets wounds. His body was put on display at a sports stadium as a warning then thrown out on the street of a Santiago shantytown. The stark contrast between the themes of his songs— love, peace, and social justice—and the brutal way in which he was murdered transformed Jara into a potent symbol of struggle for human rights and justice for those murdered during the Pinochet regime. This was the political context in which Manduka found himself and he had no choice but to flee to Argentina with members of Los Jaivas. In the years that followed, Manduka would continue to wander the world, living and working in Venezuela, Germany, France, Spain and Mexico, publishing records and books, scoring films, and collaborating with artists such as Naná Vasconcelos and Pablo Milanés. Manduka returned to Brazil in 1988 where he remained until his death on October 17, 2004, due to cardiovascular complications.  …….~


Soulful sounds from 70s Chile – and a record that easily rivals some of the best acoustic work from the post-Tropicalia generation in Brazil! Manduka’s got a heady sound that’s very much in keeping with his image on the cover – a freer sort of approach to the music than the decade before – with these long-flowing tracks that intertwine folksy elements and regional touches, but always with some slight undercurrent of jazz – almost at a level that rivals the acid folk of the UK scene of the same time, but with a definite deeper South American vibe. The vocals are sublime – extremely haunting, even beyong the boundary of language – and often recorded with some echo around them and the guitar, in a manner that recalls some of the best Geraldo Vandre material. Instrumentation includes some light backing on flute, bongos, acoustic guitar, and harmonica – often used in a gentle, watery sort of way. Completely sublime – one of those lost global gems you’ll treasure for years….Dusty Groove…~


Rare Brazil psych & folk influenced. Line up includes the guitarrist of Congregacion Baltazar and drummer and bongo player from Los Jaivas. some tracks are brazil influenced some are more congregacion like but all with good classic guitar….~


During his lifetime, Brazilian singer-songwriter Manduka was something of a globetrotter, spending periods of time living in Argentina and Europe as well as his native Brazil. In 1972, when this brilliant debut album was first issued, he was based in Chile. Not that the set boasted much of a Chilean music influence: instead, it saw Manduka lay down a set of samba-influenced folk songs whose minimalist acoustic elements (lead vocals, guitar, backing vocals) came doused in dream pop style reverb and delay. Naturally, original copies are extremely hard to find (not to mention prohibitively expensive on the second-hand market), making this reissue more than welcome. It remains a brilliant album and arguably Manduka’s strongest work……~


We have come to the end of our musical journey through Latin American music. He had said, at the beginning of these posts, that he intended to introduce Latinos and also artists of Portuguese language. I confess that I was so involved with the 'new song’ that I ended up forgetting the Portuguese. But soon I’ll come back and give these artists a hard time. Finishing the week, we go with the Manduka. Early talent, at age 18 already partnered with Geraldo Vandré in Chile. He also had Chilean partners like Los Jaivas. He ran this Latin America by the tail, showing his art. Son (of fish) of the poet Thiago de Mello and godson of Manoel Bandeira, the guy had everything to be genial, and it was! Parallel to music, he had in the plastic arts his other passion. He died in 2004 at the age of 52 … This album was his first album, recorded in Chile….~.




Credits 
Bongos – Eduardo (Los Jaivas)* 
Congas [Tumbadora] – Gabriel (Los Jaivas)* 
Flute, Charango – Pato (Amerindios)* 
Guitar [Guitarras] – Baltazar (Congregacion]*, Manduka 
Harmonica – Julio (Amerindios)* 
Vocals – Manduka 
Vocals [Voces - Partipacion Especial] – Soledad Bravo



Tracklist 
A1 Brasil 1500 10:30 
A2 Entra Y Sale 5:46 
A3 Naranjita 5:10 
B1 De La Tierra 4:21 
B2 Patria Amada Idolatrada Salve Salve 4:56 
B3 Oiticumana 2:05 
B4 De Un Extranjero 4:54 
B5 Qué Dirá El Santo Padre 4:46 

johnkatsmc5,the experience of music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

Dance

Dance

Crazy with music

Crazy with music

vinyl

vinyl