Saturday, 16 June 2018

Mike Bloomfield “Bottom Line Cabaret 31.3.1974” (Remastered) Live FM Radio Broadcast Concert In Superb Fidelity (bootleg) 2015, 2 x CD Unofficial Release US Blues,Electric Blues,Blues Rock


Mike Bloomfield “Bottom Line Cabaret 31.3.1974” (Remastered) Live FM Radio Broadcast Concert In Superb Fidelity (bootleg) 2015, 2 x CD  Unofficial Release  US Blues,Electric Blues,Blues Rock   excellent bootleg…recommended…!
full deezer
https://www.deezer.com/en/album/10142716

full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/2aovMzjplRE6V2zlKVMIUI


This legendary concert held at New York’s Bottom Line on March 31st, 1974, broadcast on WNYU-FM, conveys the majesty of Bloomfield’s phenomenal ability whilst also paying homage to friends Al Kooper, Roger Troy, John Hammond, George Rains and Barry Goldberg…..~


This recording of blues master Mike Bloomfield’s live work serves to amaze and educate, as Bloomfield had done with his seminal 1975 solo album If You Love These Blues, Play'em As You Please. For fluency and versatility, look no further, as the blessings of B.B. King, Otis Spann, and Muddy Waters confirm. This legendary concert, held at New York’s Bottom Line on March 31st, 1974, and presented in it’s entirety as it was broadcast on WNYU-FM, conveys the majesty of Bloomfield’s phenomenal ability while also paying homage to friends Al Kooper, Roger Troy, John Hammond, George Raines, and Barry Goldberg. Digitally remastered; includes background liners…..~


This has been around on trade / torrent web sites for may years and unlike may recent FM-sourced recent issues by other bands (Jefferson Airplane come to mind), this is actually better quality than those web sources. Not sure why it is on 2 CDs as overall length is 79:41. 
The recording isn’t perfect with the same FM drops / tape-flip, etc as on all the sources, but anything by the great Mike Bloomfield is worth having and this is up with some of his best, so buy with confidence!! …– TomP ……~


As noted by another reviewer, this concert has been available in other versions for years. However, the sound is much improved here, although it still somewhat falls below the quality that appeared on Bloomfiield’s Columbia and Takoma records from this period. In spite of this, Bloomfield and friends, including Al Kooper and the great Jelly Roll Troy, sparkle on this album. They play with energy, conviction, and a joyful looseness. 
I would not recommend this as a starting place for appreciating Bloomfield’s talents, but for those already familiar with his output, this album is a must-have…..by……– Rex Chickeneater…..~


An unpublished live recording by Michael Bloomfield . There are not many live documents of the great guitarist, who died in the early eighties: apart from the recordings with Al Kooper (the legendary The Live Adventures ), there are only two records, I’m with You Always (Live at McCabe , 1977) and the excellent Live at Old Waldorf (Live 76 and 77).
First of all, this is an antecedent recording, it dates back to 1974. Then Michael is accompanied by a super band: Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg on keyboards, George Rains , drums, Roger Troy , bass. Only the presence of two pianists of the value of Kooper and Goldberg gives the concert a higher value than the other two (even if in Old Waldorf there is Mark Naftalin who is not inferior to anyone). Michael is here, at Bottom Line, to present Try It Before You Buy It , his second solo album which has remained unpublished (at least until 1990 via One Way). But the evening is one of the right ones. Bloomfield plays and sings (in some song,Got To Use My Imagination and Sweet Little Angel , I’m Al and Roger to sing), above all it plays, in an extraordinary way, supported by piano and organ, Kooper and Goldberg, as it had rarely happened to him in the past. A super band, with a classic sound, where the guitar obviously has the upper hand: Bloomfield and his band play in the manner of Muddy Waters , with Otis Spann on the piano, resuming classics and not their own repertoire: on all Sweet Little Angel , twelve minutes of great blues. But also Inside Information , more than eight minutes, with a fairytale plan, while Glamor Girl, one of the unpublished box retrospective released last year, is extraordinary: over eight minutes of pure electric blues with the guitar that slaps the crowd, while the plan darting behind. As in the best performances by McKinley Morganfield. An epochal version. But also Sweet Little Angel, Inside Information , Do not You Lie to Me and Linda Lu , are not far behind.
The place is full, the people are very hot and Michael’s blues is hot. Master in slow blues, in keeping the tension high even for ten minutes and more per song, Michael still gives lessons of skill with Let Them Talk , Trouble Ahead of Me and If I Get Started All Over Again . If this double had come out when he was still alive, he would have made sparks. It would have been a formidable business card. But his function still does it, and how, because he keeps us remembering a formidable musician. Both good and unlucky. So long Michael….by Paolo Carù….~ 


Michael Bloomfield was one of America’s first great white blues guitarists, earning his reputation on the strength of his work in the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. His expressive, fluid solo lines and prodigious technique graced many other projects — most notably Bob Dylan’s earliest electric forays — and he also pursued a solo career, with variable results. Uncomfortable with the reverential treatment afforded a guitar hero, Bloomfield tended to shy away from the spotlight after spending just a few years in it; he maintained a lower-visibility career during the ‘70s due to his distaste for fame and his worsening drug problems, which claimed his life in 1981. 

Michael Bernard Bloomfield was born July 28, 1943, into a well-off Jewish family on Chicago’s North Side. A shy, awkward loner as a child, he became interested in music through the Southern radio stations he was able to pick up at night, which gave him a regular source for rockabilly, R&B, and blues. He received his first guitar at his bar mitzvah and he and his friends began sneaking out to hear electric blues on the South Side’s fertile club scene (with the help of their families’ maids). The young Bloomfield sometimes jumped on-stage to jam with the musicians and the novelty of such a spectacle soon made him a prominent scenester. Dismayed with the turn his education was taking, his parents sent him to a private boarding school on the East Coast in 1958 and he eventually graduated from a Chicago school for troubled youth. By this time, he’d embraced the beatnik subculture, frequenting hangout spots near the University of Chicago. He got a job managing a folk club and frequently booked veteran acoustic bluesmen; in the meantime, he was also playing guitar as a session man and around the Chicago club scene with several different bands. 

In 1964, Bloomfield was discovered through his session work by the legendary John Hammond, who signed him to CBS; however, several recordings from 1964 went unreleased as the label wasn’t sure how to market a white American blues guitarist. In early 1965, Bloomfield joined several associates in the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, a racially integrated outfit with a storming, rock-tinged take on Chicago’s urban electric blues sound. The group’s self-titled debut for Elektra, released later that year, made them a sensation in the blues community and helped introduce white audiences to a less watered-down version of the blues. Individually, Bloomfield’s lead guitar work was acclaimed as a perfectly logical bridge between Chicago blues and contemporary rock. Later, in 1965, Bloomfield was recruited for Bob Dylan’s new electrified backing band; he was a prominent presence on the groundbreaking classic Highway 61 Revisited and he was also part of Dylan’s epochal plugged-in performance at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival. In the meantime, Bloomfield was developing an interest in Eastern music, particularly the Indian raga form, and his preoccupation exerted a major influence on the next Butterfield album, 1966’s East-West. Driven by Bloomfield’s jaw-dropping extended solos on his instrumental title cut, East-West merged blues, jazz, world music, and psychedelic rock in an unprecedented fashion. The Butterfield band became a favorite live act on the emerging San Francisco music scene and in 1967, Bloomfield quit the group to permanently relocate there and pursue new projects. 

Bloomfield quickly formed a new band called the Electric Flag with longtime Chicago cohort Nick Gravenites on vocals. The Electric Flag was supposed to build on the innovations of East-West and accordingly featured an expanded lineup complete with a horn section, which allowed the group to add soul music to their laundry list of influences. The Electric Flag debuted at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival and issued a proper debut album, A Long Time Comin’, in 1968. Critics complimented the group’s distinctive, intriguing sound, but found the record itself somewhat uneven. Unfortunately, the band was already disintegrating; rivalries between members and shortsighted management — not to mention heroin abuse — all took their toll. Bloomfield himself left the band he’d formed before their album was even released. He next hooked up with organist Al Kooper, whom he’d played with in the Dylan band, and cut Super Session, a jam-oriented record that spotlighted his own guitar skills on one half and those of Stephen Stills on the other. Issued in 1968, it received excellent reviews and moreover became the best-selling album of Bloomfield’s career. Super Session’s success led to a sequel, The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper, which was recorded over three shows at the Fillmore West in 1968 and released the following year; it featured Bloomfield’s on-record singing debut. 

Bloomfield, however, was wary of his commercial success and growing disenchanted with fame. He was also tired of touring and after recording the second album with Kooper, he effectively retired for a while, at least from high-profile activities. He did, however, continue to work as a session guitarist and producer, and also began writing and playing on movie soundtracks (including some pornographic films by the Mitchell Brothers). He played locally and occasionally toured with Bloomfield and Friends, which included Nick Gravenites and ex-Butterfield mate Mark Naftalin. Additionally, he returned to the studio in 1973 for a session with John Hammond and New Orleans pianist Dr. John; the result, Triumvirate, was released on Columbia, but didn’t make much of a splash. Neither did Bloomfield’s 1974 reunion with Electric Flag and neither did KGB, a short-lived supergroup with Barry Goldberg, Rik Grech (Traffic), and Carmine Appice that recorded for MCA in 1976. During the late '70s, Bloomfield recorded for several smaller labels (including Takoma), usually in predominantly acoustic settings; through Guitar Player magazine, he also put out an instructional album with a vast array of blues guitar styles, titled If You Love These Blues, Play 'Em as You Please. 

Unfortunately, Bloomfield was also plagued by alcoholism and heroin addiction for much of the '70s, which made him an unreliable concert presence and slowly cost him some of his longtime musical associations (as well as his marriage). By 1980, he had seemingly recovered enough to tour in Europe; that November, he also appeared on-stage in San Francisco with Bob Dylan for a rendition of “Like a Rolling Stone.” However, on February 15, 1981, Bloomfield was found dead in his car of a drug overdose; he was only 37…….~ 


This is something that deep Bloomfield fans need in their music collection. Right away–what about the sound? It’s actually decent/pretty good for a live set from a radio broadcast–but a little flat and slightly distant–but Bloomfield’s guitar is clearly heard along with the rest of the band, but the vocals are fairly distorted–so if you’re an audiophile forget it. You’ve heard better and you’ve heard worse sound. Adjusting the volume up a bit helps with the overall sonics. Bloomfield’s vocals were never his strong suit, and this set is no exception. The band features Bloomfield, Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg-keyboards, George Raines-drums, and Roger Troy-bass/vocals. Kooper is heard occasionally on vocals The six page booklet has a short essay on the band and some good period photos of Bloomfield on stage. The first disc is about 45 minutes in length with Disc 2 a bit over 33 minutes long. The rating is for the performances not the sound quality. 

This is a good example of Bloomfield’s magic. His guitar solos have that tone and slippery groove heard from previous years. Beginning with “Don’t You Lie To Me” (with a good but short Bloomfield solo) the band rolls into “Linda Lou” with another rockin’ Bloomfield solo. Things slow way down for the (12 minutes+) blues classic “Sweet Little Angel”, with Bloomfield showing his blues chops are still intact and on fire from the start of this great tune. Roger Troy takes over the vocals for this tune which helps the feel of this song. Bloomfield is throwing out solos and short accents that make this one of the high points of this set. Just you wait until you hear him about four minutes into this classic tune. Whoa. 

Other songs include “Unchain My Heart” , “Inside Information”, “Tryin’ To Find The Door”, “Glamour Girl” (all on Disc 1), while Disc 2 begins with “Heartbreak” (with a good rocking Bloomfield solo and some great organ), “Imagination”, “Let Them Talk” ( a nice slowy), “Trouble Ahead Of Me” (with a molten Bloomfield solo at the beginning), and “If I Get Started Again”. “Inside Information” and “Heartbreak”, for whatever reason quickly fade in with a Troy vocal, with the band tight and right there. But all these tunes have something to recommend them. This is the type of set that makes you wish you could’ve been sitting there close to the stage that night. The band is tight and Bloomfield plays some good solos throughout this set. Listen to “Glamour Girl” or “Trouble Ahead of Me” and you’ll hear Bloomfield doing what he does best. What a loss to music. In some ways this reminds me of the few nights I heard him jamming with friends back in the late '60s–still one of the great magical memories from that era when I was in college in Palo Alto, and would make the journey into The City for a music fix. 

But if you’re a Bloomfield fan (like me) you’ll probably want t to add this to your Bloomfield section on your music shelf. The band is tight, Bloomfield gets it done, and the song selections are just right. If the sound was better this would be a small classic in Bloomfield’s discography. But the chance to hear him solo on top of a good, sympathetic band is just too good to pass up…..by…. Stuart Jefferson….~ 


Personnel: 

Mike Bloomfield: Vocals, Guitar 
Ray Kennedy: Saxophone, Multi-Instruments 
Barry Goldberg: Keyboards 
Rick Grech: Bass 
Carmine Appice: Drums




DISC 1: 
1. Band Introduction 
2. Don’t You Lie to Me 
3. Linda Lou 
4. Sweet Little Angel 
5. Unchain My Heart 
6. Inside Information 
7. Tryin To Find The Door 
8. Glamour Girl 

DISC 2: 
1. Heartbreak 
2. Imagination 
3. Let Them Talk 
4. Trouble Ahead Of Me 
5. If I Get Started All Over Again 

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