Saturday, 16 June 2018

Spirit "The Original Potato Land" 2006 Recorded in 1972-1973 US Psych Rock


Spirit  "The Original Potato Land" 2006 Recorded in 1972-1973 US Psych Rock 
full deezer (Complete with all bonus)
https://www.deezer.com/en/album/1125377

full spotify  (not complete)

https://open.spotify.com/album/2Fl3291iMEXGn7tbAstoXC


Like other “lost” rock albums such as the Beach Boys’ SMiLE, Spirit’s Potatoland has been “found” periodically, notably in 1981, when a version of it was released, eight years after it had been rejected by Epic Records and shelved. According to Spirit scholar Mick Skidmore, however, that version “was to all intents and purposes a bastardized version of the original concept” for which Spirit leader Randy California recorded numerous overdubs in an attempt to update its sound. Skidmore prefers the acetate he heard – and taped – on a BBC radio show in 1973, and now that he is in charge of the Spirit archives, he has attempted to reconstruct the album as it was originally intended for this reissue. In his annotations, he explains that Potatoland was not actually begun as a Spirit album per se, for the simple reason that, at the time, California and drummer Ed Cassidy, the only other original member of the band involved, had lost the rights to the name Spirit. California had recently released his debut solo album, Kapt. Kopter & the (Fabulous) Twirly Birds, and having reconnected with Cassidy, began the project as a duo album. (The full title is sometimes rendered as The Adventures of Kaptain Kopter & Commander Cassidy in Potato Land, and a revised, still unissued version was called Randy California and Ed Cassidy – Back Together Again.) The concept, as delineated in spoken word interludes between the songs, had the two veering off the highway to a mysterious place called Potato Land, where they encounter, among other things, a giant chocolate eclair. These bits of dialogue, reminiscent of the stoned interplay of Cheech & Chong, served as introductions to the songs, a typical collection of catchy, guitar-driven pop/rock, including, in this version, reprises of such old Spirit songs as “1984” and “Nature’s Way.” 

Skidmore has refurbished the sound, at least to the extent of removing pops and clicks, but much of the disc still sounds like a demo. Still, that helps it retain its period charm. It is hardly a masterpiece, but it certainly is entertaining and lighthearted. Whether it would have been “a huge hit” and reshaped Spirit’s career if it had been released in 1973, as Skidmore asserts, is impossible to say, though the band clearly was poised for a commercial breakthrough that never happened. Recognizing that this release will appeal mainly to “die-hard Spirit fans,” Skidmore has stretched the disc out to nearly 80 minutes by including alternate takes, live material recorded at the time, and even a bit of the conversation from that radio show he heard in 1973. Some of the live tracks, notably the covers of Junior Walker’s “Shotgun,” Allen Toussaint’s “Get Out My Life Woman,” and Mance Lipscomb’s “Miss This Train,” all from September 1972 Kapt. Kopter shows, provide proof of Skidmore’s statement that “Randy was THE natural successor to [Jimi] Hendrix”; on these occasions, he definitely played a lot like his old boss…..by William Ruhlmann….allmusic….~





The original recordings on this CD are a better reflection of the effort Spirit gave to the Potatoland project during 1972/3 compared to the belated 1981vinyl “Adventues in Potatoland” (Rhino Records etc). The belated 1981 issue provided a rather watered-down and confused mix of tracks, embellished by some contemporary disco or popular music influences on overdubs and re-recorded parts, to promote sales in the new decade of the 1980s. This contrasts with the thoroughly imaginative, unconventional and free-thinking way in which the work was originally conceived and performed, as shown on this release. 
Although the tracks are less well produced - and without the finishing touches and overall production quality etc of the 1981 release - they better capture the free feeling, inspiration and extent of the truly quite bizarre adventure of Captain Kopter and Commander Cassidy on their rather special trip. For those who dont know, the story of the album begins as the pair leave a motorway to follow a previously unseen exit to Potatoland (Junction 27) out of curiosity, hoping to find an escape from the boredom of everyday life, like finding love. 

Even if their playing is not as tight. precise or careful as it could be, or their special effects as convincing or powerful (in hi-fidelity terms at least) as contemporary standards, there is great camaraderie, humour and originality here, along with awesome playing. The album is a total antidote to all self important and/or pretentiously elaborate prog-rockers everywhere. The band get to the spirit of what they are doing and you just want to be there with them 100% all the way. Amidst the off-the-wall humour and silliness there is more Orwellian darkness too than was hinted at back in 1981. 

The CD also contains some bonus previously unknown live tracks from 1972, where they are also really in-form, with Randy California producing some top Hendix-like work with wild fuzz guitar. 

This is just about my favourite Spirit work - recommended alongside Twelve Dreams and the best of the rest of their earlier work for conventional musical reasons. However, for the comic-book clarity of the proceedings, the humanitarian and environmentalist leanings of the songwriting, or for other reasons like simply wanting to be on board in the message, there is perhaps no equal in their catalogue for me. A truly unique adventure and a classic even though it was unfinished back in the day, and remains so….by…..Dragontrouser….~


Anyone hearing this disc for the very first time might well conclude that this is the weirdest album ever produced. On one level there is an Orwellian concept running through all the tracks, but it’s presented in a whimsical comic book-like story about our two adventurers (Kaptain Kopter and Commander Cassidy, the two principals in Spirit) visiting a world inhabited by giant potato people. This album was intended to be the follow-up to Randy California’s Kapt Kopter and the (Fabulous) Twirly Birds, but when the band presented it to Epic, they refused to release it, and eventually cancelled Spirit’s contract over it, leaving the band without a label. Before that all happened, in early 1973, while Spirit was touring the UK, they made an appearance on Bob Harris’ BBC radio show, at which time the entire first side of the yet-to-be-released Potato Land album was played. Many listeners taped that show in anticipation of the album’s release, but after months went by with no release, Harris (who still had the acetate) played the entire second side of the album. Now the entire album was out there, albeit circulating as a bootleg tape among fans. Two years went by, then Spirit finally resurfaced on Mercury records with a new double album Spirit of 76. It seemed like Potato Land would never be released, although calls for its release continued from fans throughout the world. 

Spirit - The Adventures of Kapt. Kopter and Commander Cassidy in Potatoland coverFinally, in 1981, Potatoland was released – but it wasn’t the same version that had been premiered eight years earlier; instead it featured four newly recorded tracks on the first side of the LP, and the second side featured material from the first side of the original version, but heavily remixed with many new parts and overdubs added. Finally, in 2006, the original 1973 version premiered on the BBC was released with a half dozen bonus tracks (mostly live material taken from a 1972 Kapt Kopter show) and a short interview clip with California and Cassidy extracted from that Bob Harris show in April ‘73. Within the concept album, there are numerous references to Spirit’s earlier work, including a new version of their legendary ‘banned’ single “1984,” to set the Orwellian tone, and a reprise of it near the album’s end. “Natures Way” from Sardonicus also appears here in a reworked version, and in a short reprise titled “Nature’s Theme.” The core of the first side contains the five songs “Turn to the Right,” “Donut House,” “Fish Fry Road,” “Information,” and “My Friend,” which are all tied together into a suite with the story line dialog interspersed. These are all great songs that could stand strong on their own. The second side continues with a rockin’ version of “Walkin’ the Dog” that would have fit well on the Kapt Kopter… album, then continues with a series of potatoland related suites, reprises and dialog bits, ending up with the memorable song “It’s Time Now” (which would later be repurposed as the closer for the Son of Spirit album in 1975). This 2011 reissue of the “original” version includes a second disc which contains the entire 1981 Potatoland “re-make” album, with four additional bonus tracks, including “Midnight Train,” a song heretofore only available as part of a one-sided flexi-disc in Dark Star magazine around 1978. So with this two-disc version, one gets the ’73 original, the ’81 re-make, and a nice collection of bonus material all in a single package…..by Peter Thelen…..~




For the first time the album appears in a form that Randy California imagined in the early 70s. An earlier attempt to release the “conceptual” album Spirit in the original form taken in the early 80s ended in failure. The presented publication includes everything, and even more: seven additional songs and an interview with Randy California and Bob Harris from April 1973….~



Line-up / Musicians 
- Randy California / bass, guitar, vocals, effects, spoken word, keyboards 
- Ed Cassidy / percussion, vocals, drums, spoken word 
- Larry Knight / bass, vocals 



Tracklist 
1 Introduction 0:43 
2 1984 3:49 
3 Exit 27 (Dialogue) 1:24 
4 Turn To The Right 3:44 
5 Everything Talks To Me (Donut House) 3:43 
6 Fish Fry Road 3:24 
7 Nature’s Theme 0:45 
8 Information 3:11 
9 My Friend 2:49 
10 Walkin’ The Dog 3:01 
11 Giant Potatoes (Dialogue) 0:31 
12 Lonely In Potatoland (Mashed Potatoes) 3:04 
13 Nature’s Way 2:37 
14 Salvation: Matter Of Time: Suite 5:29 
15 1984 (Reprise) 0:44 
16 Oil Slick-Million Years Suite 4:32 
17 Information Reprise 1:46 
18 It’s Time Now 4:53 
Bonus Tracks 
19 You Know 1:29 
20 Donut House (Alternate Version) 3:40 
21 Ain’t That Too Bad 3:17 
22 Devil (Live 9/13/72) 4:48 
23 Shotgun (Live 9/13/72) 4:35 
24 Get Out My Life Woman (Live 9/6/72) 5:54 
25 Miss This Train (Live 9/6/72) 3:12 
26 Interview Clip With Randy California, Ed Cassidy And Bob Harris, April 1973 2:25 

johnkatsmc5,the experience of music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

Dance

Dance

Crazy with music

Crazy with music

vinyl

vinyl