Saturday, 7 July 2018

Atila ‎ “The Beginning Of The End (El Principio Del Fin)” 1975 + ‎“Intencion” 1976 + ‎"Reviure = Revivir” 1978 + "Devoción / Sensación" single 7" 2005 Wah Wah Records,Spain Psych Prog Symphonic


Atila ‎ “The Beginning Of The End (El Principio Del Fin)” 1975 + ‎“Intencion” 1976 + ‎“Reviure = Revivir” 1978 + "Devoción / Sensación" single 7" 2005 Wah Wah Records,  Spain Psych Prog Symphonic 
Atila ‎ “Intencion” 1976 full dailymotion
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xpbijw

Atila “Devocion” 1975 (single) (HQ) on dailymotion

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x33gdq6

Atila ‎ “The Beginning Of The End (El Principio Del Fin)” 1975 full vk
Atila ‎ “Intencion” 1976 full vk
Atila ‎ “Reviure = Revivir” 1978 full youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEnFWOk_eKk


The Spanish band ATILA was formed in ‘73 by Eduardo Biebla (guitar), Joan Punyet (drums) and Paco Ortega (keyboards), soon several personnel changes followed. This legendary and highly acclaimed progrock band made three LP’s: “The Beginning Of The End” ('75), “Intencion” ('76) and “Reviure” ('77). At the end of '78 the band dissolves but in '99 they reformed with Joan Punyet (drums), Benet Nogue (keyboards), Ignasi Bosch (guitar), Pere Martinez (bass) and Joan Cardoner (guitar). In the same year this ATILA line-up did a reunion-concert, playing their best material. The sound of ATILA has elements from VANILLA FUDGE, CREAM, The NICE and ELP but in general … it’s ATILA! 

The remastered second album “Intencion” (considered as their best) and a concert from '99 are put on 1-CD (entitled “Atila: Intencion + Reviure”), this is a treat for the lovers of 'vintage-keyboards’ (Hammond, Moog, Mellotron) with some mindblowing moments (swirling organ and fat Moog runs) but the guitarwork is also worth listening, a bit harder-edged but very inventive, at some moments with a Spanish flavour. The songs from the live-concert ('99) are more original and belong to the best Spanish progrock ever made: intense, compelling and exciting climates and shifting moods (a bit like the Italian IL BALLETTO DI BRONZO but less complex) with lots of great solos. “Reviure” is a masterpiece for the fan of Continental European progressive music. BEAUTIFUL MUSIC!!!..~



The Catalonian group Atila released three diverse albums in the mid to late 70’s. Starting primarily as a raw hard rock psych group, Atila evolved into one of the finest instrumental progressive space rock acts around. They are one of the few 70’s Spanish bands to not include a strong indigenous element to their sound. 
The Beginning of the End is a rough mix of instrumental hard rock with an incredibly long drum solo for such a short album. It has been considered one of the crown jewels of Euro prog, but it serves as nothing more than an odd curiosity of the very early post-Franco era. Best avoided except for completists. 
The label BASF signed the group for their second effort, Intencion. This album shows what the band can do if given some time in the studio. Borrowing from classical motifs, Atila added what can only be called a vicious guitar sound with some strong organ/synth playing and quite a bit of drum action. Side two is a rework of the debut album, here titled as “El Principio del Fin.” Starting with a Phantom of the Opera-like organ, the piece explodes into a Black Sabbath guitar riff before settling into an easy groove with moog, organ, fuzz guitar jamming, and drum solo. A must for progressive fans who like psychedelic sounds. 
Reviure was promoted to super label EMI/Odeon, Atila produced another primarily all instrumental album. Now the hard rock/psych edges have been replaced by a smoother cosmic edge. The organ tossed completely for the moog and the biting fuzz guitar for a more spacey one. The complex progressive moves are still here, but now the focus is on long synthesizer drones and atmospheric spacey guitar. The four long tracks on display here are each marked by their superb composition style, changes of tone and mood, and subtle energy. Reviure is a must listen for the fan of Continental European progressive music. (Tom Hayes, as reviewed in Gnosis)….~ 



Atila ‎ “The Beginning Of The End (El Principio Del Fin)” 1975

A real top of the Spanish/Catalan prog scene,Atila were formed in 1973 as a trio by guitarist Eduardo Alvarez Niebla,keyboardist Paco Ortega and drummer Juan Panet,hailing from Girona.They were mostly famous for the two full-length lbums they released,but before them it was the live recording “The beginning of the end (El principie del fin)”,which functioned as a demo presentation of the band. 
This was just one track of 30 minutes length,but do not expect a structured superb epic to be heard.“’'The beginning of the end” is more of a live jamming of the band,which additionally sounds a lot more than an early-70’s than a mid-70’s archive.This lengthy composition can be described as organ-driven Heavy Psychedelic/Prog Rock with a few Classical adapted themes connected with plenty of guitar/organ solos and grooves,cut around its middle by a 3 min. drum solo.The abscence of the bass does not help,despite the generally rich sound.Surprisingly the track flaws easier than expected,as the band changes from smooth psychedelic to heavy organ-driven forms in constant moments. 

The album ends up to be a cool archival release of this short-lived Spanish legend with some high but also a lot of low points,yet nowhere near their full-length releases,both in terms of music and production.Recommended mainly to fans of organ-based Proto Prog….by apps79 …..~

Recorded live sometime in 1975, this is absolutely tremendous psych flavored progressive hard rock. Though it appears from the back of the album cover that the title track may be broken up into 16 (!) different parts, there are no times given for each part, nor are there any delineations. The entire album plays through from start to finish as one long track. And a very trippy one at that. Clocking in at just under 30 minutes, it’s not the longest thing ever released, but you do feel as if the piece was fully developed by it’s end. All instrumental, “The Beginning of the End” starts out with a rather classical sounding organ solo intro, and progresses on through the many passages to other solos (including the dreaded drum solo - not too long though, about 2 min.) and an excellent climax. Primarily for prog fans, but hard rockers will get a kick out of it too. Recommended….by….tymeshifter ….~

Atila’s extremely rare debut LP is a good one but I still expected a bit more from it. The band plays a mix of prog and psych rock in a jam band style. I guess this album was recorded live. Most of the time the record sounds enjoyable but the drum solo part has never impressed me that much. Apart from that this album does it’s job very well. 
Apparently this was a very small pressing so the original vinyl LP is a mega rarity. The Beginning of the End isn’t one of my personal favourites but I like it. If you’re into prog rock jamming with lots of organ you might wanna check this one out. It might not be Atila’s best work but it’s definitely an enjoyable listen….by….CooperBolan ….~

The disc is structured as an instrumental suite consisting of eighteen brief topics linked without solution of continuity with a total duration very close to half an hour. 
The beginning of the organ of the “Toccata y Fuga en Re m.” of JSBach executed in a very orthodox manner by Paco Ortega hammond gives beginning to a series of classic developments prodigal in modulations. After this beginning, classic to no longer able, the guitar and the battery attack hardrockera force to merge with long keyboard chords. From there, a whole festival of guitar solos, keyboards adorned with noisy waves and white noise from the primitive moog synthesizer. From minute twelve, Joan Punyet starts one of the longest drum solos recorded by a Spaniard on a disc with more than three minutes duration. After the orgy of drums the baroque organ returns to lord it over the suitethat runs in its last minutes on roads of hard progressive rock. 
The absence of bass subtracts a certain heaviness, but sometimes the sound fabric threatens to fly in any direction without an anchor that holds the pulse of the different fragments. 
An experimental load as few have dared throughout the half century of Spanish rock with obvious archaic influences of Iron Butterfly and its “ In-a-gadda-da-vida” and those closest chronologically to the group of Emerson, Lake & Palmer or the first King Crimson. 
This same suite cut in its duration was also included in the second LP of the group: “Intent” (BASF, 1976) ; However, it should be noted that the sound illustration that accompanies this commentary is taken from that first original LP recorded in Gema 2 studios. Specifically, it is the first eight minutes of the suite that occupies both sides of that first LP of the band. The listener will notice an abrupt end, since it is a fragment of the suite of half an hour of total duration……..by Julián Molero ….Fonoteca…~


Credits 
Drums – Joan Punyet 
Guitar – Eduardo Niebla 
Keyboards – Francisco Ortega*

Tracklist 
A1 Play
A2 Coming
A3 One Day
A4 Ally
A5 Foamy
A6 Main Street
A7 Experimental Time
A8 Other Day
A9 Merry
B1 Playful
B2 Wit
B3 Hot Winter
B4 Amy
B5 Play Time
B6 Tuesday
B7 Radiant
B8 Last Day
B9 Cosmos

Tracklist 
1 Play = Juengo
2 Coming = Vamos
3 One Day = Un Dia
4 Ally = Alicia
5 Foamy = Espumoso
6 Main Street = Coso
7 Experimental Time = Tiempo Experimental
8 Other Day = Otro Dia
9 Merry = Alegre
10 Playful = Juguetón
11 Wit = Ingenio
12 Hot Winter = Caluroso Invierno
13 Amy = Amanda
14 Play Time = Diversión
15 Tuesday = Martes
16 Radiant = Resplandeciente
17 Last Day = Ultimo Dia
18 Cosmos = Espacio





Atila ‎ “Intencion” 1976

Catalan ensemble Atila arose in 1973, near the ancient walls of the fortified city of Girona. The original composition of the team (Eduardo Alvarez Niebl - guitar, Francisco 'Paco’ Ortega - keyboards, Juan Punet - percussion) has changed over time. When the children’s debut EP “Beginning of the End” (1975) and successful performances in France and Spain (the first prize at the international festival Golf Drouot) were already listed, Ortega self-destructed from the group. Instead, Benet Noghe (organ, mellotron, piano, Mug, vocals) was accepted, and Miguel Blasco continued to carry the heavy burden of the bass player with dignity. The fifth, unspoken participant Atila was sound engineer Juan Vidal, responsible for a variety of sonic effects. In March 1976, a warm company of friends retired to the studio to create a full-length album. 
Four large-scale tracks presented the audience with a grandiose symphonic-rock panorama. Opening title program epic is not devoid of pathos and a touch of theatricality. The crew of Atila with obvious pleasure flanks between the frank affiliated gloss, virgin pure chorals (Carmen Ros, Gloria De Miguel, Montserrat Ros, Nieves De Miguel) and filled with game collisions fusion-prog rides. In the central part of the narrative, the incendiary Hammond-driven balancing act is muffled, the song lyrics, voiced by keyboardist Noga and powdered with bright solo maestro Eduardo, appear on the front of the stage. And then - a dashing epilogue with cosmic laser battles, the erection of a quasi-orchestral colossus and a direct hit in the outstretched embrace of the universe. Unusual competitions with classics unfold in the frescoes of the “Cucutila”. Signor Benetu is given carte blanche for all kinds of organ-polishing works, which he uses. Lush polyphonic intro, high-speed arpeggios and staccato fasten to the variety of the musical with friendly female-noses “on-to-on” and subsequent caricature synth-pranks. There is a symbiosis of skilful symphonic art with modulation of pop type; and strangely enough, this design is quite capable. Exercises to attract opposites await us in the play “Día Perfecto”. Religious-ecstatic motifs are passed through the filter of fighting fusion-rock, but at the output we still get a radiant message, painted with angelic harmonies. The final 16-minute suite “El Principio del Fin” revolves around the familiar callsigns “Toccata und Fuge in d-moll” I. S. Bach. Here, the Atahleaders can flaunt the keyboard a lot, satisfy the guitar distortion-appetites, poke it behind the drum set and blandly bluff over the philharmonic gods, adding to the percussion of rock and roll riot. Farewell is a wonderful bonus: the ballad “Un Camel de Xocolata”, created in 1999 by a fairly reformed quartet (old-timers Nogu and Punet, in conjunction with young colleagues). 
I sum up: a powerful, complex sympho-prog, realized with audacity, skill and talent. I recommend…by…sagael …~

Intención was Atila’s second album and it’s often considered as their best. The album is definitely a step forward from their debut. The Beginning of the End is a solid and good record but Intención is still much better. While their debut was recorded live and it included a very jam band oriented style of this second symphonic prog oriented effort. It reminds a lot of some of the Italian prog of the same time. 
The album includes just the four tracks that are all pretty damn awesome if you ask me. Especially I enjoy the A-side. The title track which opens the album is probably the most impressive as well. If you ask me Intención is one of the best prog rock albums from Spain. In case you like symphonic prog and Italo-prog of the 70’s this album is definitely worth a try….by…CooperBolan …~

After moving to France for six months to come in touch with there-based underground musicians and play live, Atila returned to Girona, welcoming new keyboardist Miguel Blasco.They recorded “ Intención ”, the opening track of which is still bluesy Hard / Psych Rock with big time organ and guitar soli, but the latter tracks are somewhat close to The Nice ’s Classical Prog with plenty of organ, guitars also prevail laid-back psychedelic moves in the equation.Female choirs to come close to a musical style and I do not like them at all, but the epic instrumental passages.A bit inconsistent, but one of the most energetic Symphonic Prog albums out there…..by…apps79…~

The most praised album of Atila is recorded in 1976 with a quartet formation already, which includes the bassist Miguel Ángel Blasco and the new keyboardist Benet Nogue along with the two founding musicians of the group, Joan on drums and Niebla on the solo guitar. Away from symphonic vagaries, it is now the most orthodox progressive rock that predominates in the recording. Although the presence of varied keyboards is still present throughout the LP, it is now the guitar that seems to lead the operations. Although an eminently instrumental album, it will also include short parts sung in Catalan by Benet. 
Formally the album is formed by a side A with three songs and a B side with a single piece of about a quarter of an hour in length, in which the group, with better instrumental and recording means, recovers the suite “The beginning of the end ”, which had completely occupied his first LP: “ The Beginning of The End ”(New Promotion, 1975) . 
The number that gives name to the whole album is supported by a solid rhythmic section on which Eduardo Niebla sports his progressive punctuations and Benet opens his keyboards like the tail of a peacock, looking for more the sound effect than the melodic development. Touches of hammond, mellotron and moog for a piece of ornate rock. 
“Cucutila” is the shortest song that serves for the gimmicky development of keyboards without a story and a battery in the military march plan ; nevertheless, it includes in its central part a delicious part of keyboard that slows down the time on the percussion effects with a curious use of the percussion dishes on its crown. In the end it turns to hardness with the counterpoint of the softness of a female chorus. Interesting Mannerist piece that lovers of symphonism have on an altar. 
If you listen to “Perfect Day” it will sound good enough to the first things of Politeclista Vangelis. Dream atmospheres in the beginning with keyboards and drums floating in a sound space free of gravity to take fleshly earth in a frantic rock loaded with virtuosity in keys and strings. A whole sound palette representative of a style and a time. Never Attila was so close to the great European instrumental bands. Not coincidentally, it was the Spanish group that would most enjoy abroad during the 76 and 77 years. 
On the other hand, a reduction of the first LP, here reduced more or less to its half. Bach and drums for the suite he had put the year before to Attila in a recording studio for the first time. For this recording, the previous keyboardist Paco Ortega was rehashed, who had participated as the main reference in the first recording and in the gestation of this work….by Julián Molero ….Fonoteca…~

Catalan ensemble Atila arose in 1973 near the ancient walls of the city-fortress of Girona. The original composition of the team ( Eduardo Alvarez Niebl - guitar, Francisco 'Paco’ Ortega - keyboards, Juan Punet - percussion) has changed over time. When the children’s debut EP “Beginning of the End” (1975) and successful performances in France and Spain (the first prize at the international festival Golf Drouot) were already listed, Ortega self-destructed from the group. Instead, Benet Noghe (organ, mellotron, piano, Mug, vocals) was accepted , and Miguel Blasco continued to carry the heavy burden of the bass player with dignity . The fifth, unspoken participant of Atila was the sound engineerJuan Vidal , responsible for a variety of sonic effects. In March 1976, a warm company of friends retired to the studio to create a full-length album. The result of the sessions was the record “Intención”, issued by the local branch of BASF. 
Four large-scale tracks presented the audience with a grandiose symphonic-rock panorama. Opening title program epic is not devoid of pathos and a touch of theatricality. Crew Atila with obvious pleasure flanniru between a fancy poster gloss, pristine pure chorals ( Carmen Ros , Gloria De Miguel , Montserrat Ros , Nieves De Miguel) and filled with game collisions fusion-prog rides. In the central part of the narrative, the incendiary Hammond-driven balancing act is muffled, the song lyrics, voiced by keyboardist Noga and powdered with bright solo maestro Eduardo, appear on the front of the stage. And then - a dashing epilogue with cosmic laser battles, the erection of a quasi-orchestral colossus and a direct hit in the outstretched embrace of the universe. Unusual competitions with classics unfold in the frescoes of the “Cucutila”. Signor Benetu is given carte blanche for all kinds of organ-polishing works, which he uses. Lush polyphonic intro, high-speed arpeggios and staccato fasten to the variety of the musical with friendly female-headed “on-the-on” and subsequent caricature synths-pranks. There is a symbiosis of skilful symphonic art with modulation of pop type; and strangely enough, this design is quite capable. Exercises to attract opposites await us in the play “Día Perfecto”. Religious-ecstatic motifs are passed through the filter of fighting fusion-rock, but at the output we still get a radiant message, painted with angelic harmonies. The final 16-minute suite “El Principio del Fin” revolves around the familiar callsigns “Toccata und Fuge in d-moll” but at the output, we still get a radiant message, brightened by angelic harmonies. The final 16-minute suite “El Principio del Fin” revolves around the familiar callsigns “Toccata und Fuge in d-moll” but at the output, we still get a radiant message, brightened by angelic harmonies. The final 16-minute suite “El Principio del Fin” revolves around the familiar callsigns “Toccata und Fuge in d-moll"I.S. Bach . Here it is a scorcher from Atila can be enough pogartsevat on the keyboard, guitar distortion satisfy appetites, jamming on drums and mildly sneer over Philharmonic gods, adding peppered rock and roll riot. Farewell is a wonderful bonus: the ballad "Un Camel de Xocolata”, created in 1999 by a fairly reformed quartet (old-timers Nogu and Punet, in conjunction with young colleagues). 
I sum up: a powerful, complex sympho-prog, realized with audacity, skill and talent. I recommend.   …sound voyager….~

Best known for the incredibly magnificent Reviure, one of the best progressive rock albums all around, Atila are a Spanish classical rock group that started small and went out with a bang. Intención falls closer to the latter quality, playing a compex classically influenced rock. Lost Vinyl’s only mark against them so far is the ridiculously shoddy pressing they used to master this CD – I had a better quality tape recording than the LP they used, and the fact that they snipped a couple of seconds from the beginning gives the strong start too much of a harsh abruptness. Regardless, you can always crank it up and the sound is pretty good just rather scratchy. The music here is quite good, not really hinting at Reviure, but more like a more mature version of their debut. In fact, Atila decided to redo their “The Beginning of the End” suite as its Spanish title “El Principio del Fin” at half the original time, resulting in a far more coherent and dynamic track. The first side is a slightly different affair – a diverse array of classical rock in the Italian school – with hints of groups such as The Trip, BMS, Corte dei Miracoli, Triade, or Buon Vecchio Charlie. In other ways it could be compared to the Spanish group Canarios by the way they do rock versions of classical themes. The opener “Intención” is especially excellent with a complex progressive with chunky organ and great fuzzed lead guitar with an intensity that reminds one of Brezovar (Ange). While it isn’t quite as superb as Reviure (few albums are that good), it’s still excellent and comes definitely recommended….by Mike McLatchey,…..~

Ironically, for the German BASF label, the Spaniards of Atila produced their second album, which has made the disc in the original to an expensive rarity. The group from Gerona offers a rather rough sympho-hard rock on “Intencion”, which contains hardly any Iberian-folkloristic elements and, if it were not for the occasional singing in the native language, hardly gives any indication of the country of origin of the musicians. 

The mostly heavily distorted electric guitar by Niebla and the keyboard park of Nogue determine this music. Basically, the group is a classic progue quartet - guitar, keyboards, bass, drums - and just such a classic symphoprog are the Spaniards here. The music is reminiscent of anything genre-ELP, The Nice, Pink Floyd, Camel, or any of the many British hard-rock combos featuring a well-staffed organ section-but manages to remain reasonably independent. Tastenmann Nogue romps on organ and Moog (the Mellotron is rarely used), while Niebla usually whines his guitar yowls (occasionally but also à la Gilmour solos). The fifth man on this album is Juan Vidal, who from time to time provides “typical sound effects”, ie wind noise, synthesizer hiss, blubber, - twittering and wavering, Echo and Hall. This music is clearly influenced by the classical music, culminating in the inevitable Bach quote at the beginning and end of “El Principio Del Fin”. The rare solo vocals are quite restrained, which is not true for some, rather cheesy choral deposits. 

“Intencion” is a solid album with quite varied, if somewhat dusty Symphoprog of the harder kind, which can get the one who can not get enough of the classical prog of the 70s. Something new and very original is not offered here, even though the combination of fuzz guitar (which almost reminds of Black Sabbath) and Moog synthesizer might not be that commonplace…..By: Achim Breiling…babyblaue prog….~ 

Credits 
Bass Guitar – Miguel A. Blasco 
Choir – Carmen Ros, Gloria De Miguel, Montserrat Ros, Nieves De Miguel 
Drums – Juan Puñet* 
Lead Guitar [Guitarra Solista] – Eduardo A. Niebla* 
Organ, Mellotron, Piano, Synthesizer [Moog], Vocals – Benet Nogue

Tracklist 
A1 Intencion 8:39 
A2 Cucutila 4:37 
A3 Dia Perfecto 6:25 
B El Principio Del Fin 15:43 




Atila ‎ “Reviure = Revivir” 1978

Very much in the spirit of its predecessor “Intencion”, “Reviure” is a magical album with original charm and character that will appeal to all fans of 70’s progressive rock. ATILA offers long instrumental jams and heavy symphonic dynamics throughout (somewhere in the CAMEL, ELP mode). They take great care in their playing with some pretty crafty instrumentation with heavy focus on keyboards as the dominant focus. Bass, guitar and drum interplay is superb as well with some monumental aspects throughout this album. There is some vocals as well and they are very well done with great emotion and range. Hate to say this but this is another essential album you will need to have in your collection….by loserboy ….~


Now this is their best…longer jams and tracks.
Heavy vintage synth use and pretty much similar to their first one, with a better and more solid interplay of guitar-bass-drum, and again mostly instrumental……..hardly ever I would recommend 2 albums of the same band as being essentials, this one is the exception; in spite of that, if I have to choose because one reason or another….I will probably get this one, and somehow will come back for the other later. The epic track of the same name of the band “Atila” is a Masterpiece of symphonic progressive rock that shows what collectible this band was really capable off, also there is an amazing drum solo (not particularly a fan for those) that will make your head pause and pay attention, I think this track alone pays the price of the CD.
Please, let me ask you if I could!!!…….What the heck are you waiting for?. My friend, just go and try to get it, while copies last…A Superb Masterpiece!!!!..PERIOD…..by Prognut ….~

4.5 stars. Man these guys can play. The interplay between these musicians is amazing, and for me this is what stands out the most about this album. Specifically the bass, keyboards and guitar playing off one another is a blast to listen to.The album cover is almost misleading as you would think there would be some pretty dark tunes inside judging from it.
The first song “Reviure” starts off with the sound of wind blowing and other eerie sounds, then light drums, guitar and keyboards come into play. Synths are prominant 2 minutes in.There is a fiery guitar solo, then back to the rhythm, then the keyboardist has his solo with drums following along. Vocals come in after 6 ½ minutes and they sound really good. Organ a minute later as the sound and vocals build. Synths and drums lead the way late.Great opening song.The next song “Somni” has lots of spacey keyboards early. A change 1 ½ minutes in as strummed guitar, drums, then bass joins in. Synths follow. I really like this hypnotic section but it changes after six minutes as the tempo picks up and vocals then guitar take over. It changes back to the hypnotic vibe of earlier 8 minutes in to the end.

“Atila” opens with someone coughing while others are talking. Then the drums, moog, keyboards come in playing together while the guitar solos over top.There is a spacey interlude.The song sounds good after 6 ½ minutes with the moog and drums. Guitar starts to solo like earlier. Nice bass too. Organ comes in, then a drum solo. Synths and organ take turns leading the rest of the way. The final song “Al Mati” has some vocals, but clearly this is an album that is focused on the amazing playing skills of these talented Spaniards. It’s windy then spacey to open before it kicks into gear. Vocals and a calm follow. The vocals are so passionate at times. Great section. It picks back up as the tempo continues to shift. Some outstanding guitar and bass later.
This is a record that needs to be played a lot to be appreciated. I keep hearing things I didn’t grasp at first, and i’m sure this will continue for some time. A real treasure…. by Mellotron Storm …..~

Gotic, Iceberg and Fusioon have given splendor to the area of prog rock in Spain from the aforesaid country’s Catalonian region. But they haven’t been the only ones. Atila is a name to be added in this selected group, and this album “Reviure” (their second official album, their third real release) is the main reason why. Having given proof of their sonic strength and genuine enthusiasm in their previous effort “Intención”, this album was the band’s undisputed zenith. The band’s natural, relentless energy was properly focused within the stylish trend of symphonic prog, with the addition of space-rock’s atmospheres and jazz-oriented dynamics in lots of places. Yet, the whole sound is not what you would call eclectic or hybrid, but essentially symphonic. There is not a wasted second in any of the four tracks comprised in this repertoire. The namesake opener starts with psychedelic guitar harmonies, spacey synths and percussive adornments, with the bass guitar freely displaying a solo in between. This is the gradual elaboration of a prelude to the powerful main section that combines ballsy guitar and elegantly measured keyboard orchestrations. The sort of mood created here reminds us of a “Moon Madness”- era Camel leftover picked up and revamped by a combo of musicians from Iceberg, Metamorfosi and Asfalto. The brief sung section is very ceremonious, allowing the track’s scheme to include a moment of pompous seriousness among the overall explosive ambience. 'Somni’ is less extroverted, working on the combination of the lyrical and the spacey on a jazz-friendly rhythmic basis. The long synthesizer solo that makes much of the track is a genuine expression of keyboardsman Noguer’s ambitions for the band’s musical trend. The sung portion is joyful, mischievous in a way. Being as it is the song’s rockier section, the somewhat predominant stance of the guitar solo makes perfect sense: it is even prolonged into the first third of the track’s coda before the synthesizer resumes its initial starring role. 'Atila’ is the definitive monster track in the album: not only that, it is the definitive Atila factor in the development of Spain’s progressive rock. In many ways this piece is heavily connected to the jamming strategy that had made such a strong mark on the debut album’s spirit, but there is something new about the sophistication used in its delivery. Everything falls right in place here; the grooves are so powerfully sustained that they make sundry sonic elements work perfectly as a succession of sorts: heavy guitar riffs and leads, cosmic synth layers, stylish organ solos, drum rolls intertwined with krautrock-like electronic pulsations, a drum solo, a delicious Bardens-meets-Wakeman Moog solo, etc. The humoresque vocalizations at the end bring a proper dose of folly to this exhibition of artistically shaped rock. The album’s final 7 minutes are occupied by 'Al Mati’. This piece is mostly symphonic, bearing a weird family resemblance to Apoteosi and “Contrappunti”-era Le Orme. The instrumental interlude provides some jazzy variations (I wish it had been longer) before the tracks returns to the symphonic realms. The guitar solo that starts at the 4'40" is the best by Niebla. As always, the synth ends up assuming the leading role, even making a weird cybernetic twist in the end while the guitar concludes the final melodic flavors. This is 4.75-star material, a masterpiece indeed. This Atila album deserves every letter in every word of praise published in the Internet…..by Cesar Inca ….~

Last album by this Catalonian quartet, and probably their crowning achievement, Reviure (reviver in Catalan) must be one of the most stunning Iberian albums around. Unlike many of their peers, Atila avoided sounding “Italian”. (as Crack did) and were typically theirs (as Coto & Pel), roughly based on a sound between Vanilla Fudge, King Crimson, with un unusually ever-present Moog synth in the foreground. Niebla’s guitar is excellent all around and leaves no ground uncovered that Nogue’s Moog had left unfilled. Their sinister semi-skeleton artwork sure gave them an edge on many of their peers in the shelves of record stores. .
Two tracks aside with plenty of mainly instrumental enthusiastic prog (excellent but not overly pleasant vocals) filled of tricky time sigs and great interplay (JP Gomez’s bass work is outstanding, getting the odd touch and oh-so-subtle of Zeuhl into a soundscape that Crimson would not disclaim. Like many of their Catalan peers (such as Iceberg, Fusioon or Maquina), Atila made sure that their music was solid in all department including the drummer Punet (he gets a short drum solo slot in the awesome eponymous track) and unlike what some seem to say, there is still some organ parts, namely in the album’s apex, Atila. Four excellent tracks, not a moment of rest and plenty of power.
Although all three Atila albums are vastly different from each other, I believe all three are much worth the investigation, the debut being a bit iffier, unless you’re into the type of music found on erotic spoof movie Vampyros Lesbos. One of the best albums from the Iberic peninsula…. by Sean Trane ….~


If one by using the term 'progressive rock’ point towards the idea that music holds a certain progression in character, the band Atila surely hits the spot with their second offering, Reviure. Their first album was a truly wonderful album but very crude and leaning very much towards heavy prog in places, Reviure rather relies on atmosphere and shading. I suppose the term symphonic is rather telling. And while there is plenty of atmospheric excursions, such as is the case in 'Somni’, one is bound to find several outbursts of the heavier sort.
As is the case with dictatorships, there are bound to be limitations. Now, without knowing too much about Spain under the boot of Franco, I could, however, surmise that cultural expression had it’s limits and boundaries. In the mould of dicatorship there cannot be too much of artistig (or otherwise) expression. If so, I suppose, the dictator will feel he’s losing control. Anyway, I won’t ramble on the subject too long. My point is, really, that the death of Franco seemes to unleash an endless stream of talented, supressed musicians bursting at the seams with musical visions. Atila was one of those bands.

The opener, Reviure, starts off soothi g enough but soon burst out and the band delivers one majestic performance of symphonic styled prog, based on keyboards (as is much of this album). Somni is one of the best tracks among utterly brilliant ones. Amazing keyboards an texture. Atila is really hard and rocks hard prior to the winds of Al mati. Soothing and atmospheric but multilayered it ends a brief but so well constructed album.

If you’re into keyboards, and vintage at that, this is very much an album for you. It holds everything you could wish for and played with great skill. The band is so tight and plays so well, I continue to be amazed and in awe. Though largely instrumental it holds just enough vocals to add to the mix, presenting some relief (by no means meant in a bad way) to the intensity of the instrumental parts.

In sum, this is a wonderful piece of art. Four tracks of immense beauty and beastly character. I seem to pick up new things every time and just when I think I’ve heard it all it explodes in front of my eyes (or ears) and delivers further depth. I am always cautious of giving five stars but I am bound to do so here. There is no other rating to consider. Utter brilliance and truly an album to discover….by GruvanDahlman …..~

4 to 4.5 stars. The 3rd and most elaborated album by Atila, gone are the proto-prog elements and here we have clear symphonic style blended with space-prog ala Pink Floyd Meddle epoch. They signed to EMI, bassist was replaced by Jean Pierre Gomez and the female choir was eliminated, keyboardist Benet Nogué still provides the few vocals.
First track Reviure (Live Again) is a great song, starting atmospherically and building up tempo. The bass and drums are much better than in the previous albums, finally taking some attitude. There are a few vocals with lyrics revindicating the catalan culture.

2nd track Somni (A Dream) is more spacy, with a constant bass line over which keyboards and guitar improvise, good but the weakest of the album.
3rd track Atila starts with some disgusting coughing but once started it’s a great track displaying very good keyboard and guitar soloing on a strong rhythm background.
Al Mati (In The Morning) is the best track, the most symphonic, with a few vocals sections but for the most part relying on the great instrumental work of the guys.
Definitely the best Atila album, if you feel like discovering this band this is the place to start, if you like them then check out their 2nd album Intencion.
There are (at least, as far as I know) 2 CD editions of this album, as a pack together with the previous album Intencion. The release by the tiny and now extinct label Pan Y Musica featured a live version of the full Reviure album from a live concert in 1999, sice EMI would not release the rights of the studio recording, it’s good and it can decently substitute the studio version. The Mandala release contains the studio version of the Reviure album which I personally find the best…..by Gerinski ….~


“Reviure” (Odeon, 1978) (Revive) had been recorded the previous year. It was destined to be the LP with which Atila was going to take off completely after his good performances in the main state festivals and his tour of France, but he will not achieve this task. On the contrary, it will mean the end of his innovative project .

The record is recorded with Miguel Blasco as guitar, Benet Nogué on keyboards, Joan Punyet on drums and the incorporation of the French all-rounder Jean Pierre Gómez on bass. The puncture of the disc is necessary to look for it in that Atila stays to the margin of the two prevailing currents then in the Spanish progresismo . Nothing to do with the Andalusian rock, although they have wanted to look for certain similarities with Mosque . Little to do also with the progressive rock as it was understood by his countrymen Iceberg or Fusioon , which for geographical reasons was called laietano rock.Atila is getting closer and closer to the court of King Crimson and his music seems to enter a space rock full of speculations.

The song “Reviure” sails between jazz waters and has two verses sung on a background of the most confused that plays a noisy dispersion that leaves the listener a bit perplexed.

In his European journey Atila had known the prodigal kautrock in spatial topical elements. Nor were they oblivious, of course, to the Pink Floyd recordings. With these elements they propose us an interstellar trip with slight stops in the acoustic, the jazzy, the rock, the Latin winks in the guitar and much, much cosmic dust.

“Atila” begins with a coughing attack and a fart of keyboards to take the ethereal body of an intergalactic nymph represented by keyboards. Of course, every nymph is harassed. On this occasion riffs and guitar taps seriously threaten the virginity previously presented. Good subject, although of the twelve minutes it exceeds some in my opinion.

Much noise, few nuts, litany in Catalan and end of heart attack for the closing of the album with “Al matí”. One of those pieces that so lavish the virtuous seventies musicians in which their instrumental virgueries walk to nowhere.
It was expected more of this LP, which has a well-worked sound and a good production, but to which they turned their backs the usual of the group and with which a criticism was primed that surely did not understand it……….by Julián Molero ….Fonoteca…~


Tracklist
A1 Reviure = Revivir 9:59
A2 Somni = Sueño 9:32
B1 Atila 11:53
B2 Al Matí = En La Mañana 7:14 



















Atila ‎ “Devoción / Sensación” single 7" 2005 Wah Wah Records 

Tracklist 
A Devoción 5:44 
B Sensación 6:08 












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