Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Bart Walker “Waiting On Daylight” 2013 US Blues Rock


Bart Walker “Waiting On Daylight” 2013 US Blues Rock 

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Winner of the prestigious Gibson Best Blues Guitarist in the 2012 International Blues Challenge. Country star Bo Bice s six-string right-hand man! Produced by Grammy® winner Jim Gaines….~


Waiting On Daylight’ is the stunning new album from Nashville based guitarist/singer Bart Walker who plays southern fried blues/rock with a burning intensity that hits you right between the eyes! Blessed with a voice somewhere between the great Ronnie Van Zant (Lynyrd Skynyrd) and Little Milton, Bart Walker delivers grunge fuelled blues driven with virtuoso guitar licks that should leave you comfortably numb! ‘Waiting On Daylight’ was recorded at Bessie Blue Studios in Tennessee by legendary producer Jim Gaines with the magnificent Bart Walker on guitar & vocals backed by Memphis session players Dave Smith on bass, Rick Steff on keyboards, Steve Potts on drums and special guest Dave Cohen on organ. 

'Waiting On Daylight’ boasts 9 new songs from Bart Walker along with roaring remakes of J.B. Hutto’s 'Hipshake It’ and the Allman Brothers classic 'Whippin Post’! Starting proceedings is 'It’s All Good’ which reminds us that whatever turmoil we may find ourselves in, the best things in life are free and the baseline next on a grunge soaked 'Black Clouds’ launches an assault on the senses that you could easily get used to! 'Took It Like A Man’ tells of some of life’s troubles he took on the chin moving it up a gear with riffs echoing ZZ Top at their best, prior to reverting into a classic blues groove on the erotic 'Girl You Bad’ that rolls back the years. One track that exemplifies Bart Walker at the peak of his powers is 'Gotta Be You’, that finds him ripping it up as good as anyone out there today and has to be one of the best songs you will hear this year! 

Longing for one more second chance on the romantic title track 'Waiting On Daylight’ allows the mellower side of this talented performer to shine through, before rockin’ 'n’ rollin’ on 'Happy’ and J.B. Hutto’s 'Hipshake it’! Some sweet slide guitar features during the infectious melody on 'Mary & Me’ which also highlights his importance as a songwriter, and his political anthem '99%’ underlines this when he questions what happened to the American dream? Finally, he acknowledges one of his greatest influences by playing a rousing rendition of the Allman Brothers classic 'Whippin Post’ making this album essential listening for all blues fans! 

Bart Walker is yet another young & gifted blues artist to be found on the Ruf Records label and 'Waiting On Daylight’ is well and truly kicking up some dust… just make sure you play it loud and proud!….by…. John Stracey….~



If fat slide tones are your thing—like the sounds Duane Allman gave us in At Fillmore East—you’ll dig Bart Walker’s sophomore solo album. But that’s only one of the cards he has up his sleeve: There’s nasty Texas snarl à la Billy Gibbons, dirty riffs that recall Gordie Johnson in Big Sugar, sassy bends that’d pass muster with Kentucky Headhunters’ Greg Martin, and fast, fluid lines that could have sprung from the nimble fingers of David Grissom or Doyle Bramhall II. 
Walker references these great players and more, but he stirs their sounds into a gumbo all his own. And to top it off, he’s a powerful vocalist—soulful and swaggering. 
The songwriting elevates Waiting on Daylight beyond the typical “wannabe bluesman” fare. Walker deftly sidesteps that thorny issue by sticking to lyrics that sound believable coming out of his mouth. Bar fights, lost love, lust, and redemption? Yes. Hoodoo man up from the Stovall Plantation? Mercifully, no. 
Produced and engineered by the legendary Jim Gaines (SRV, Carlos Santana, John Lee Hooker, Albert Collins), Waiting on Daylight has a big, punchy sound and Walker’s incendiary licks leap from the speakers like a runaway steamroller…..by…Andy Ellis….~



Bart Walker, a long haired rocker with a wailing blues guitar and a bellowing voice to be heard, released his new album Waiting on Daylight just this past month. Listening to this record from beginning to end, one can hear beefy tones, lyrical lines, and funky grooves of every musical color. A raw and unique blend of blues, classic rock, southern rock, and heavy metal, the album is a prime collaboration of covers and originals that Walker was able to piece together with perfection. Like a classic rock record, Waiting on Daylight tells much of its story through explosive emotion and passion conveyed in the rhythms, harmonies, melodies, and thundering instrumentals that make this album a catchy, unforgettable release. However, beneath the beautifully distorted rock & roll are bluesy poetic lines that reveal glimpses of Walker’s tales of woe — financial struggles, political angst, regret, and the struggle of a man to love without compromising his freedom. A bluesman at heart, Walker doesn’t write a song with a story left untold. 

From the onset, the listener will surely be tapping his foot and feeling the instantaneous groove of the record from “It’s All Good,” a blues rock song reminding his lady that “it don’t cost a thing to snuggle up at night,” for through financial turmoil, love is free and everlasting. Throughout the album, Walker continues to tie in such familiar and relatable themes, oftentimes weaving heartbroken lines into upbeat tracks. Similar songs on the record include “Black Clouds,” “Gotta Be You,” and “Mary & Me.” Likewise, in “99%,” a song with a strong and opinionated political message told with energetic and passionate revolutionary unrest, Walker belts, “It don’t matter if your tie is blue or red
/ Those things won’t make no difference if this country falls down dead /
We are the, we are the 99%
/ We are the, we are the ones to take a stand.” 

In contrast to a typical blues record, Walker has several songs that make any music lover want to get down or feel good, tunes with a lighthearted twist for a genre which is often considered quite melancholy. For instance, “Took It Like a Man” covers an array of problems, but Walker boasts that he dealt with his emotions the macho way — “I got drunk, stayed out all night / Got my ass kicked in a bar room fight / I lost my car, I threw up in a garbage can / Yeah, it didn’t bother me / I took it like a man.” In the same way, Walker’s pride is evident in “Happy,” a catchy song with a notable message — the ultimate source of true happiness comes from personal liberty. Although most settle for a mundane existence, following behind in the shadows of others, he gloats they secretly wish otherwise — “Deep down I know you wanna be just like me.” “Girl You Bad” is a promiscuous, erotic song, one that would certainly appeal to the classic rock & roll fan, while his cover of “Hipshake It” makes the passive listener become an active participant and dance. The final song and second cover, “Whippin’ Post,” is a mellow piece about the suffocating effects love can have on an individual and the desire for freedom, while “Waiting on Daylight” is a beautiful, regretful romantic ballad, a plea for a second chance, a search for a glimmer of hope. Walker cries out, “I’m just waiting on daylight / I’m just waiting on a sunrise.” Accurately capturing the title of the album, this song is haunting and unforgettable. 
Walker has no need to wait any longer. With this album, he has already blazed a brightly lit path for himself, one that will certainly lead him to carry on both his name and the legendary genre of blues into the years to come….by Jill Jacobs…Blues ..review….~



Bart Walker, a long haired rocker with a wailing blues guitar and a bellowing voice to be heard, released his new album Waiting on Daylight just this past month. Listening to this record from beginning to end, one can hear beefy tones, lyrical lines, and funky grooves of every musical color. A raw and unique blend of blues, classic rock, southern rock, and heavy metal, the album is a prime collaboration of covers and originals that Walker was able to piece together with perfection. Like a classic rock record, Waiting on Daylight tells much of its story through explosive emotion and passion conveyed in the rhythms, harmonies, melodies, and thundering instrumentals that make this album a catchy, unforgettable release. However, beneath the beautifully distorted rock & roll are bluesy poetic lines that reveal glimpses of Walker’s tales of woe — financial struggles, political angst, regret, and the struggle of a man to love without compromising his freedom. A bluesman at heart, Walker doesn’t write a song with a story left untold. 

From the onset, the listener will surely be tapping his foot and feeling the instantaneous groove of the record from “It’s All Good,” a blues rock song reminding his lady that “it don’t cost a thing to snuggle up at night,” for through financial turmoil, love is free and everlasting. Throughout the album, Walker continues to tie in such familiar and relatable themes, oftentimes weaving heartbroken lines into upbeat tracks. Similar songs on the record include “Black Clouds,” “Gotta Be You,” and “Mary & Me.” Likewise, in “99%,” a song with a strong and opinionated political message told with energetic and passionate revolutionary unrest, Walker belts, “It don’t matter if your tie is blue or red
/ Those things won’t make no difference if this country falls down dead /
We are the, we are the 99%
/ We are the, we are the ones to take a stand.” 

In contrast to a typical blues record, Walker has several songs that make any music lover want to get down or feel good, tunes with a lighthearted twist for a genre which is often considered quite melancholy. For instance, “Took It Like a Man” covers an array of problems, but Walker boasts that he dealt with his emotions the macho way — “I got drunk, stayed out all night / Got my ass kicked in a bar room fight / I lost my car, I threw up in a garbage can / Yeah, it didn’t bother me / I took it like a man.” In the same way, Walker’s pride is evident in “Happy,” a catchy song with a notable message — the ultimate source of true happiness comes from personal liberty. Although most settle for a mundane existence, following behind in the shadows of others, he gloats they secretly wish otherwise — “Deep down I know you wanna be just like me.” “Girl You Bad” is a promiscuous, erotic song, one that would certainly appeal to the classic rock & roll fan, while his cover of “Hipshake It” makes the passive listener become an active participant and dance. The final song and second cover, “Whippin’ Post,” is a mellow piece about the suffocating effects love can have on an individual and the desire for freedom, while “Waiting on Daylight” is a beautiful, regretful romantic ballad, a plea for a second chance, a search for a glimmer of hope. Walker cries out, “I’m just waiting on daylight / I’m just waiting on a sunrise.” Accurately capturing the title of the album, this song is haunting and unforgettable. 

Walker has no need to wait any longer. With this album, he has already blazed a brightly lit path for himself, one that will certainly lead him to carry on both his name and the legendary genre of blues into the years to come. Review by Jill Jacobs …blues rock review….~



Credits 

Bass Guitar – Dave Smith 
Drums – Steve Potts (2) 
Guitar, Vocals – Bart Walker 
Keyboards – Rick Steff 
Organ – Dave Cohen (8) (tracks: 11) 


Tracklist 
1 It’s All Good
2 Black Clouds
3 Take It Like A Man
4 Girl You Bad
5 Gotta Be You
6 Waitin On Daylight
7 Happy
8 Hipshake It
9 Mary & Me
10 99 %
11 Whippin Post 

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