Saturday, 14 July 2018

Bombino “Nomad” 2013 Nigeria Desert Blues,Electric Blues,Blues Rock


Bombino “Nomad” 2013 Nigeria Desert Blues,Electric Blues,Blues Rock ..recommended…!
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Best albums of 2013…Rolling Stone…..~


Nonesuch Records presents Nomad, from the Tuareg guitarist, singer, and songwriter Omara “Bombino” Moctar. At the invitation of The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, the Niger-born artist and his band traveled to Nashville for the recording, helmed by Auerbach at his studio, Easy Eye Sound. 

Before 2009, Bombino was little known outside Saharan Africa, where his career consisted of regionally available cassettes and roles in local bands. In few years, he has begun to find a following abroad. He sold out venues across the U.S. in his first tour here, in 2011, and has garnered the praise of outlets ranging from Pitchfork to NPR’s Fresh Air, whose critic Milo Miles called Bombino “a young performer with the charisma and probing imagination to become the first Tuareg star. ” Auerbach, winner of the 2013 Grammy for Producer of the Year, became a fan after a friend saw him perform and thought Auerbach might appreciate his unique style of desert blues….~


I cant even handle how much I love this musician. When I heard the first 2 chords of this record, I got a kick of adrenalin, my eyes went wide, my jaw dropped, and I remember thinking, “WHAAAT??!!”. I do however have to admit, that when the vocals came in - I wasn’t so sure. NOT because this guy cant sing, but because honestly, I didn’t know if I could get use to listening to another language. I kept it in my wish list for a bit, and went back to it 3-4 times re- listening to the samples. Quickly I was pulled in more and more until I realized one day I was singing some song is some other language as I was doing the dishes.. it was crazy. I started looking into who Bombino was, reading his story and finding out more about him, because I was so curious about a guy who was making music I couldn’t understand but still loved. The last thing I did before I ordered both of his cd’s was watch the official video for the song “Azamane Tiliade” … And with that, it was a done deal. 

These guys are just letting it all out in the studio, and though it sounds corny,IT DOESNT EVEN MATTER that I cant understand him. I don’t care. This guy is so far beyond talented and full of so much life, you cant help but sway back and forth with them….its like a trance. Honestly, it almost makes it better that I cant understand a lick of what he’s saying because I started to focus on the affliction in his voice instead. Its a pretty unique experience when you get a strong feeling just from the tone of a persons voice. This record is a giant combo of everything I personally love, and one thing I didn’t know I loved: garage/dirty rock/blues/soul/funk/ with a native flare. Talent oozing out of each note. He’s crazy! If yore tentative, its so beyond worth it to take a chance because I cant even imagine NOT having this cd along with his other, “Agadez” , which is less polished, but so great in its own way. Neither outshine the other in my opinion. Hope this helps you decide to give it a go…by..Kara….~



I recently saw Bombino perform in Scottsdale, AZ at the Musical Instrument Museum. I got the ticket on a whim after having recalled hearing them in an NPR tiny desk concert. Lucky for me, I was in the front row of this small intimate theatre and I was fascinated by the entire show. Afterwards the entire group came out and were very friendly, humbly talking, joking around and taking photos with the attendees. They were on their way to Coachella the following day. This most beautiful music, originates from the Sahara desert and with a background stemming in civil war and peaceful rebelion, as I understand it, is absolutely mesmerizing. The leader, Omaura Moctar (sp?) cites plenty of western influences, ie, Hendrix, among other guitarists. I have been listening to this CD in my car constantly since it arrived. This music is haunting, with Mr. Moctar singing in his native language – I can see him dancing as he sings!…azworker……~


Born in northern Niger, Bombino is an ethnic Tuareg, a nomadic tribe spread out across the Sahara Desert, and if he inherited a steady urge for going, it shows in his guitar playing, which is informed by the fluid, melodic, and graceful style of so many great African guitarists. But he’s also listened and studied the playing of Jimi Hendrix and Mark Knopfler closely, and maybe a little of J.J. Cale, too, another man whose guitar style embraces a sharp, dusty-tinged desert tone, and somehow out of all this, Bombino emerges as a sort of Dick Dale of the Sahara, with a guitar style that is uniquely all his own. For this, his second album, Bombino traveled to Nashville to record with the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach, and the result is a marvelous set, full of grit and funky elegance, a kind of mesh of Tuareg rhythms with Deep South delta country trance blues, and psychedelic, too, as if Jimi Hendrix and John Lee Hooker somehow got spliced together. It’s a wonderful listen from start to finish, with heavily echoed vocals, and layers of snaky, sinewy guitar lines that build and weave, separate and expand as each track goes on, until everything seems to burst transformed into the immense sonic space of an ocean, or a desert, for that matter. Although Bombino is a very political songwriter, he keeps his lyrics and melodies taut, giving his graceful, spiraling, and relentless guitar riffs plenty of room to do their thing. Highlights include the thickly chugging garage guitar epic “Amidine” that opens the set, the amazing serpentine guitar lines of “Imuhar,” the back porch Sahara country sound of “Imidwan,” and the lovely “Tamiditine,” which closes things out, but everything here certainly belongs and contributes to the rich, gritty, and ultimately joyous tone of this wonderful album…..by Steve Leggett…allmusic….~


The meeting of western rock stars and non-western musicians is so fraught with potential pitfalls, it’s a wonder any decent records ever come of it at all. Cross-pollination is hampered by gaps in language, by preconceptions (on both sides), by label demands for a marketable product, by the suspicion that someone might be using someone, or that the wider audience being sought might be put off by music too far off their wavelengths. The opposite fear is true too: that the cognoscenti will be alienated by watered-down fusions. 
Fortunately, these are not issues that besmirch Nomad, the third album by Omara “Bombino” Moctar – a member of the Tuareg Ifoghas clan, usually based in Agadez, Niger – overmuch. It was recorded respectfully, and predominantly live, by Dan Auerbach, leader of the hugely successful Black Keys, in his Nashville studio. He could have made an ugly hash of it, but, as with his previous work with Dr John, Auerbach has proved once again to be a very sympathetic arranger, adding crunch and a little local southern sweetness to Bombino’s music. 
One of the most easily exportable world sounds of recent times has been the desert blues of the Tuareg people of north and north-west Africa. This rolling, 1,000-yard-stare music is not hard on the western ear; its incandescent licks and fluid grooves would set most rock types to weeping. Nomad’s opener, Amidinine, has everything – perpetual motion, a chanted chorus, rocked-up drums and flashes of bluesy brilliance. Azamane Tiliade powers up irresistibly, with whooping throughout, and little solos where you can virtually hear Bombino grinning. 
Rock also loves a rebel. The blue-robed Tuareg have been frequently engaged in armed struggles over land rights; struggles complicated by the regional and religious politics of hotspots such as Mali and Libya. Trailblazers such as Tinariwen were the musical wing of the Tuareg rebellion. This record comes in the wake of recent hostilities in Mali, and partly serves as another reaffirmation of Tuareg culture in the face of mass deracination. 
Moctar himself grew up in a series of refugee camps, crucibles where traditional Tuareg music somehow became alloyed with the penetrating guitar lines of Mark Knopfler. Although he was something of a child prodigy, Moctar is no greenhorn now, having served an apprenticeship under Tuareg guitar master Haja Bebe where he earned his nickname (“the kid”). Bombino has two previous albums under his belt and was the subject of a 2011 documentary that spread word of his prodigious, faintly Hendrix-like, playing. This western album pushes the Bombino story along persuasively. 

Keyboards figure, where desert rock traditionally has none. They are really not that startling. The plangent wooze of lap steel isn’t wrong either, adding a note of ghostly succour to the lovely closing track, Tamiditine. A vibes solo on Imuhar really sticks out, but to a western ear it sounds great. A Tuareg might feel differently. 
You don’t need a strong grasp of Tamasheq to notice Bombino has a song called Imidiwan (Friends), also the title of a track by Tinariwen. (Here, it is not too far off country music.) This reiteration underlines the commonality of heritage and purpose between the kid and his better-known elders; you wonder idly whether Group Bombino (what his band used to be called) has become Bombino to diversify a star from the other Tuareg collectives. Ultimately, though, you can get too cynical about these things. This is fine internationalist guitar music. Niamey Jam finds everyone in the studio – Group Bombino, plus Auerbach and four session musicians – chuntering along quite famously….by…Kitty Empire…The Guardian….~



The buoyant, Middle Eastern groove of Nomad’s lead track “Amidinine” breaks open with a sandstorm solo of triplets and hammer-ons, daring you to imagine a recording of Mark Knopfler plugged into Jack White’s amplifier – being played in reverse. The Tuareg guitarist took to a Psych Fest stage in 2012 wearing a teal dashiki, his long, skinny fingers dancing on his Stratocaster knock-off in a fierce drone of desert blues. On his second international release, the Saharan – real name Omara Moctar – teamed with Dan Auerbach, who eschewed cultural documentation in his production of Nomad. The Black Keys frontman effectively hi-fied the group, stereo-panning the percussion, blessing Bombino’s sunburnt Tamashek vocals with gratuitous echo, and allowing western instrumentation like pedal steel and Hammond organ into the mix. Those daring variances bring distinction to each track and, ultimately, result in a recording that outshines Bombino’s previous studio efforts. From the aforementioned solo to gentle, closing love song “Tamiditine,” Nomad stays captivating, riding constant highlights like the galloping, reverb-drenched female contemplation “Azamane Tiliade,” silky, mesmerizing desert poetry of “Her Tenere,” and the gorgeous, folk-pop vibrations of “Imidiwan.” Nomad is more than a beautiful offering for the world music crowd. It’s the defining work of a guitar hero…BY KEVIN CURTIN,



In 2007 the Tuareg guitarist Bombino, real name Omara Moctar, was recorded at a wedding by the documentarian Hisham Mayet for the startling album “Guitars of Agadez Vol. 2.” Now 33, Bombino still lives in Agadez, a Saharan city, but is ready for global consumption: He’s a soloist and singer, a star, set up with American studio musicians and handsomely produced by Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys.Bombino’s playing is full of fast, stuttery, rhythmic hammering, coiling lines inside lines. But it also comes out in soft strums and battering single-note attacks, and its tone and phrasing have a flexible identity. In his playing, besides the sound of the pioneering Tuareg band Tinariwen, you might be reminded of Ali Farka Touré, Carlos Santana, Mark Knopfler, Jerry Garcia electric, Jerry Garcia acoustic. Bombino is never just one thing. 

Your feelings toward “Nomad” will not necessarily be determined by how you feel about the Black Keys; where Auerbach the musician still has a crush on stylistic purity, Auerbach the producer has ideas that are more inclusive and more beautiful. He’s helped Bombino make a spacious, centered record, one that stretches to appeal to Western listeners — like the nomads, known for their circular dancing, who temporarily inhabit the fields of Bonnaroo in Manchester, Tenn., every June — without strain or clutter or hipness overload. 

With its bright, saturated guitar sound, the album reproduces a little bit of the intensity of the “Guitars of Agadez” recordings (there was one album in between, “Agadez,” recorded in Niger and Massachusetts and released by Cumbancha), and, in a slightly hokey way, a little bit of their atmospherics. There are crowd or street sounds in “Azamane Tiliade,” and some songs stop in a collective slump, with the sound of clapping, as if this were a party or a casual outdoor jam rather than a heavily considered shot at a worldwide audience. 

But these songs sound less driving, more streamlined and structured and consolidated. Their rhythm has a slight New Orleans drag added to the desert beat. (The Tuareg drummer from Bombino’s band, Ibrahim Emoud, plays in these sessions, but so does Max Weissenfeldt of the German rare-groove band Poets of Rhythm.) There’s an American folk feeling in some of the acoustic guitar tracks, like “Imidiwan.” And the album takes chances by introducing instruments to the record that have no natural place in this music, particularly the organ, vibraphone and lap-steel guitar. 

Still, that lap-steel works pretty nicely, flooding the mix in “Aman,” echoed and ghostly in “Tamiditine.” In his precise, nasal voice, Bombino sings some strong lyrics; translated in the liner notes, they aim to celebrate and protect Tuareg culture and identity. But I’ll be surprised if many listeners, under seduction of the music, bother to read them. BEN RATLIFF…New York Times….~


Omar “Bombino” Moctar has achieved something of guitar-god status in certain quarters after building a career as one of the most notable Tuareg musicians to emerge from North Africa. As with the Tuareg group Tinariwen, Bombino’s popularity is growing in the States. When The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach discovered Bombino, he invited the “desert blues” master to his Nashville studio, where they recorded the divinely textured Nomad. Bombino also sings and writes his own material, and his distinctive guitar style is a perfect subject for Auerbach’s producer talents. Nomad is a gorgeous work that blends Bombino’s earthy vocals and hypnotic, repetitive guitar style with other instruments—like bass, Farfisa organ, lap steel, djembe, and percussion—to create a vibrant, lush soundscape that celebrates both western rock guitar and the sounds of the Saharan Tuareg. Songs like “Amidinine” and “Azamane Tiliade” reverberate and pulse with a distorted, bluesy Black Keys vibe, while other songs, like the softly percussion-driven “Ahulakamine Hulan” and the mesmerizing “Zigzan,” are rich with Middle Eastern flavors. A treasure…..~


Like many other tuareg musicians, bombino writes in a style influenced equally by the trance-like qualities of saharan blues & guitar styles of western rock. learning from hendrix & mark knopfler, among others, he honed his guitar technique working as a musician & desert herder near tripoli. as such, the album is a tremendous meeting of cultural reference points. opener ‘amidinine’ sets the tone with an irresistible bluesy stomp as he threads his riffs & solos masterfully around the rhythmic pulse. 'azamane tiliade’ builds up a wall of sound & melody on one guitar with virtuosic skill, accompanied only by touches of percussion, while a gentler, folkier feel is applied to 'niamey jam’, deftly trading licks with the organ.“auerbach knows how to turn bluesy, guitar-&-percussion jams into gold” 4/5 - mojo…..~ 


  Niger’s most popular guitar shredder Omara “Bombino” Moctar is back for a second go around after being touted as the artist most likely to the first true superstar of Tuareg music. I’m not sure how you measure superstar status when it comes to the Tuareg (if I did, I’d certainly opine that Tinariwen has achieved such status), plus I must cop to a certain ignorance about The Black Keys or their Dan Auerbach, who produced Nomad. What I can say for sure is that Auerbach, the latest Westerner to make his way into the Saharan music scene, knows what he’s doing and brings out the Bombino who rocks hard against walls of sound, twangs with near shades of country music and rolls through the kind of loping West African blues that sound like they were born in the mind of a shepherd in a remote area passing time by singing and learning to play guitar. 

That’s precisely what Bombino was, and he refined his licks by listening not only to his African peers but to the likes of Jimi Hendrix and Mark Knopfler. As a result his sound has a lot to offer rock and rollers who are starting to tune in to guitar-based African music without putting off more purist-eared listeners. Not that there aren’t some genuinely bold touches to be enjoyed. I mean, I couldn’t tell you if that’s a genuine vibraphone or a keyboard facsimile on “Imuhar,” but it sounds damn good, as does the pedal steel guitar that shows up in a few songs. While some of the jam session spontaneity of Bombino’s debut CD Agadez has been forsaken in favor of a more polished treatment, Bombino is still firing off his lead axe like a weapon one moment and using it to lull the flock the next. In the all-important second album department, he’s done smashingly. - Tom Orr….~ 



Tuareg guitarist and songwriter Omara “Bombino” Moctar is undeniably a man of many talents, but he seems to have his work cut out with the Saharan desert blues genre having been so convincingly sewn up by the titanic presence of Tinariwen. Finding an international audience in the shadow of one of the most acclaimed acts on the world music scene is a Herculean task. It’s lucky then that musical King Midas and one half of The Black Keys, Dan Auerbach, is on hand to produce and provide studio space at his own Easy Eye Sound studio in Nashville – a far cry from Bombino’s native Niger. 

Last year Auerbach produced a blistering set for Dr John in the form of the brilliant Locked Down, and the sprinkling of fairy dust he applies is just as evident here. Although the music is still very much part of the African continent, the fuzzy blues licks could easily find a home on the resurgent American blues roster. 

Bombino’s musical education has its genesis in turmoil, with the Tuareg tribe being forced to flee Niger on several occasions. During one exile a rebel left a guitar behind with Moctar’s family and Bombino (meaning “little child”) began to teach himself the basics, including spending hours watching videos of Jimi Hendrix and Mark Knopfler. There followed roles in local bands and small-scale cassette releases before greater recognition began in 2009. Given the western influence on his development it’s no surprise that Auerbach’s production fits Bombino like a glove. 

Opening track Amidinine set the tone with a dirty blues lick forming the sonic equivalent of finding a case of Jack Daniels at a desert oasis. While many would be distracted by Auerbach’s presence, it’s Bombino’s guitar that’s the real star of the show. His deft playing, off-kilter and juxtaposed riffs never let up over the course of the album’s 11 tracks. Other highlights include Azamane Tiliade, in which a wall of guitar overdubs produces an alighty slab of noise, and Niamey Jam’s near-psychedelic tendencies. Elsewhere, the pace varies with more subtle tracks including the atmospheric Imuhar and Imidiwan. 

Overall, this is a highly enjoyable work packed with infectious licks and proves to be an easy album to get along with from the get-go. The album’s title suggests that Bombino won’t let the grass grow under his feet for long, and it would be interesting to see his next move after the forthcoming European tour. Auerbach has delivered another crisply produced effort; given the variety of work he has produced since El Camino, the next steps for The Black Keys will be equally intriguing. In the meantime, sit back and enjoy…..by Darren Lee …..~ 





Credits 
Backing Vocals – Ibrahim Atchinguil Emoud*, Kawissan Mohamed, Kildjate Moussa Albade 
Bass Guitar – Dan Auerbach (tracks: 5), Eric Herman (tracks: 1, 4, 5, 8, 11), Kildjate Moussa Albade (tracks: 3, 7, 9), Omara “Bombino” Moctar (tracks: 6) 
Cowbell – Kildjate Moussa Albade (tracks: 5) 
Djembe – Ibrahim Atchinguil Emoud* (tracks: 2, 8, 10, 11) 
Drums [Drum Kit] – Ibrahim Atchinguil Emoud* (tracks: 1, 3-5, 7, 9), Max “DJ Max” Weissenfeldt* (tracks: 1, 3-5, 7, 9) 
Keyboards – Bobby Emmett (tracks: 1, 3, 5, 8-11) 
Lead Guitar, Composed By, Lyrics By – Omara “Bombino” Moctar 
Lead Vocals – Omara “Bombino” Moctar (tracks: 1-4, 6-11) 
Pedal Steel Guitar – Russ Pahl (tracks: 5, 6, 9, 11) 
Percussion [Auxiliary] – Max “DJ Max” Weissenfeldt* 
Percussion [Calabash] – Kildjate Moussa Albade (tracks: 2, 8, 11, 12) 
Rhythm Guitar – Kawissan Mohamed 












Tracklist 
1 Amidinine
2 Ahulakamine Hulan
3 Azamane Tiliade
4 Imuhar
5 Niamey Jam
6 Adinat
7 Her Tenere
8 Imidiwan
9 Aman
10 Zigzan
11 Tamiditine 






watch....
Bombino “Azel” 2016 Nigeria Desert Blues, Folk, World,Folk Fusion,Ethno

http://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.com/2016/09/bombino-azel-2016-desert-blues-folk.html 




watch...
Bombino “Agadez” 2011 Nigeria Ethnic Desert Blues

http://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.com/2017/04/bombino-agadez-2011-nigeria-ethnic.html

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