Friday, 6 July 2018

Doug Clifford (first former CCR member) ‎"Doug “Cosmo” Clifford" 1972 Country Rock,Swamp Rock,Rhythm n` Blues


Doug Clifford (first former CCR member) ‎"Doug “Cosmo” Clifford" 1972 Country Rock,Swamp Rock,Rhythm n` Blues  
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Creedence Clearwater Revival - interview with Doug “Cosmo” Clifford

With Creedence Clearwater Revival calling it quits in 1972, drummer Doug Clifford was the second CCR alumnus to release a solo project - 1972’s “Cosmo”. (For anyone interested, having left the band before the 1972 break-up, the late Tom Fogerty was the first former CCR member to go the solo route with the release of a 1971 single ‘Goodbye Media Man’). 

Co-produced by Clifford and Russ Gary, you couldn’t be blamed for having low expectations for Clifford’s solo project. While he was a powerhouse drummer during his CCR tenure, Clifford wasn’t exactly known for his creative contributions to the band. In fact, none of his material saw the light of day until the release of the group’s final studio set - 1972’s “Mardi Gras” where the results paled next to John Fogerty’s output. Anyhow, this wasn’t nearly as bad as it could have been. Clifford had a decent enough voice and when he didn’t push it, was more than capable of handling CCR-styled rockers - the best tune on the album 'Get Your Raise’ would have sounded right at home on a CCR studio album. The fact most of the album featured Clifford originals was also impressive. Unfortunately Clifford didn’t have a lot to say on his debut, resulting in a hodge-podge of genres ranging from country ('Take a Train’) to a classic '60s rock cover (The Spencer Davis Group’s 'I’m a Man’). Thoroughly professional, though seldom particularly exciting, or enjoyable….by…RDTEN1….~


This album’s writing was half and half. Every other song sounds like some crap Leif Garret or the Partridge Family would have done but even they might have wiped their a$$es with it. The other half SOUNDS like Creedence Rejects which is a good thing since I love CCR. I was actually surprised at Cosmo’s choice of vocal styling here though. Normally if someone had suggested it, I would have thought for sure they rode the short bus to and from school but Cosmo blended the vocal styling of both Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley and it actually did not sound bad. 
I would like to say also that this record sounded more like it was recorded in a small garage somewhere but for some of the songs, it gives the album it really needed especially for us die hard CCR fans that have a hard time understanding why a band with talent mythological proportions would call it quit knowing they would never find that level of a legacy ever again. But I have to admit, I am happy that they did as so many bands hang on until they are no longer enjoyable to listen due to bad blood within the bands but Creedence quit while they were still great thus protecting a musical legacy from being cheapened and defiled….msalyers1 ….~


Creedence Clearwater Revival drummer Doug Clifford would stick with his bandmate Stu Cook long after the band fragmented and dissolved, and Doug makes an appearance on this interesting release. But as Doug and Stu’s Creedence Clearwater Revisited doesn’t perform the music from Cosmo in concert, what the listener finds is a competent artifact from the end of the Creedence era, a competent but not very compelling voice covering Doug Sahm’s “She’s About a Mover,” John Sebastian’s “Daydream,” and the Spencer Davis Group hit written by Jimmy Miller and Steve Winwood (with Davis getting added to the copyright after the fact for throwing in that great chord that breaks the riff up). The eight other songs on this 11-track outing are composed by the drummer, and they aren’t bad. But they also prove why being adequate is much different from being great, and why John Fogerty steered the ship. Thirty years after the group disbanded, Doug “Cosmo” Clifford and Stu Cook are still performing Fogerty’s material. The addition of Donald “Duck” Dunn on bass and Tower of Power on horns while they were just starting to get hot is a plus. Tower sound great on “Get Your Raise,” and had Clifford issue about ten of these albums on Fantasy instead of one, he may have developed a Doug Kershaw- or Rusty Kershaw-type following. There’s some neat instrumentation on the upbeat cover of the Lovin’ Spoonful, but nothing extraordinary here. “Take a Train” – like much of the music on Cosmo – plays like a throwback to a different time. It’s R&B with a country flair, and would fit into a movie soundtrack nicely enough. The difference between solo recordings by ex-members of mainstream artists like Creedence Clearwater and left field groups like Roxy Music and the Velvet Underground is the difference between music you purchase to cherish and records you pick up to complete your collection. For what it is, Cosmo is better than what you’d expect, but not as good as it could have been. Photography is by Bob Fogerty…..by Joe Viglione…allmusic…~


Doug Clifford is best known as the powerhouse drummer for legendary American rock band, Creedence Clearwater Revival. Clifford’s signature simple grooves and impeccable timing, as heard on CCR hits including “Fortunate Son,” “Born on the Bayou” and “Who’ll Stop the Rain,” have proven to be timeless and influential on future generations of Americana and roots rock drummers. 
In 1972, Clifford recorded Doug “Cosmo” Clifford, his first and only solo outing and a fascinating artifact from the end of the Creedence era. This 11-track outing includes eight originals that range from country-infused R&B (“Take a Train”) to Latin rock (the aptly titled “Latin Music”) to CCR-style rockers (“Get Your Raise”). It also features rollicking covers of the Lovin’ Spoonful (“Daydream”), Doug Sahm (“She’s About a Mover”) and the Spencer Davis Group (“I’m a Man”). 
Joining Clifford are Stu Cook on rhythm guitar, legendary sideman and Stax musician Donald “Duck” Dunn on bass, John McFee on lead guitar, background vocals from the Walter Hawkins Singers, and the Tower of Power horn section. “Making this record was a blast, because it was a superstar line-up,” recalls Clifford. “It was a collaboration to a large degree, I told everyone that I was open to any ideas they might have. That got everybody involved in the process. The camaraderie was great, there was no pressure and that got the best performances from everyone. We cut everything live so when the horns were playing we were a 10-piece band!” Doug Clifford’s rockabilly-style vocals imbue the songs with a nostalgic flair. Available for the first time in over 40 years, this album is newly remastered by Clifford himself, pressed on 180-gram vinyl and housed in an old-school, tip-on jacket. ….~


Doug “Cosmo” Clifford was the CCR drummer’s first and only solo album. The 11-track collection features eight original tunes, plus covers of The Lovin’ Spoonful‘s “Daydream,” The Sir Douglas Quintet‘s “She’s About a Mover” and The Spencer Davis Group‘s “I’m a Man.” 
Other musicians contributing to the project included Creedence bass player Stu Cook on rhythm guitar, famed Stax session bassist Donald “Duck” Dunn, future Doobie Brother John McFee on lead guitar and the Tower of Power horn section. 
“Making this record was a blast, because it was a superstar line-up,” recalls Clifford. “I told everyone that I was open to any ideas they might have. That got everybody involved in the process. The camaraderie was great, there was no pressure and that got the best performances from everyone.”….~
1972’s Cosmo - the only solo effort from Creedence Clearwater Revival’s drummer Doug “Cosmo” Clifford - was released shortly after the breakup of the legendary band. With elements of country and R&B, Cosmo features CCR’s Stu Cook, Donald “Duck” Dunn and members of Tower of Power performing both original material and covers from the day. Available for the first time in 45 years, the LP is newly remastered by Clifford, pressed on 180-gram vinyl and housed in an old-school-style, tip-on jacket…..~


Credits

Baritone Saxophone – Stephen Kupka
Bass Guitar – Donald “Duck” Dunn
Bongos, Guitar – Armando Peraza
Cello – Judiyaba
Drums, Lead Vocals – Doug Clifford
Guitar, Steel Guitar – John McFee
Horns – Tower Of Power Horn Section
Maracas, Congas – John Mingo Lewis
Piano – Steve Miller (10)
Rhythm Guitar – Stu Cook
Tenor Saxophone – Emilio Castillo, Skip Mesquite
Trumpet – Greg Adams
Trumpet, Trombone – Mic Gillette
Vocals – Eddie Bayers, Feddie Smith, Lynette Hawkins, Walter Hawkins

Tracklist
A1 Latin Music 3:11
A2 Regret It (For The Rest OfYour Life) 2:23
A3 Guitars, Drums And Girls 2:07
A4 I’m A Man 2:25
A5 She’s About A Mover 2:27
A6 I Just Want To Cry 2:48
A1 Get Your Raise 2:31
A2 Daydream 2:10
A3 Take A Train 2:06
A4 Death Machine 2:23
A5 Swingin’ In A Hammock 2:52 
Discography 
Cosmo (1972) 
The Don Harrison Band 
The Don Harrison Band (1976)
Red Hot (1977) 

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