Sunday, 1 July 2018

Guadalquivir “Guadalquivir” 1978 first album + “Camino Del Concierto” 1980 second album Spain Andalusian Prog Flamenco Jazz Rock Fusion


Guadalquivir “Guadalquivir” 1978 first album + “Camino Del Concierto” 1980 second album Spain the first album was a masterpiece of Andalusian Prog Flamenco Jazz  Rock  Fusion  highly recommended..! 

full first album on google+

https://photos.app.goo.gl/MABxE2LRDpnuSFs19

full first album on spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/27prvEmzlGjDBCmAXe1WKq

Guadalquivir ‎ “Camino Del Concierto” 1980 second album full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/5kEISNQzIEa0g8yB24Rmi0

official website

http://www.guadalquivir-rockandaluz.com/


Founded in 1978 by Andrés Olaegui and Luis Cobo, two veteran guitarists and long-time friends with a huge experience in the Flamenco folk and fusion scene, GUADALQUIVIR was one of the most prominent jazz-fusion bands to come out from Southern Spain. The band took its name from the largest river in that area of Spain. Its overtly Flamenco-tinged sound was delivered with class and passion, something that is mostly due to the candour of the compositions and the inventive interplaying between all musicians. Unlike other contemporary bands from that same area, such as CAI, IMÁN or MEZQUITA, GUADALQUIVIR chose to stick closer to the realms of jazz and a bit away from the influence of symphonic prog; that’s why their musical offering sounds, in comparison, more obviously influenced by Di Meola-era RETURN TO FOREVER, HERBIE HANCOCK, and Pastorius-era WEATHER REPORT. In many occasions they played as opening acts for TRIANA or shared the stage with other existing Spanish prog bands of that time.
Even though the two aforementioned guitarists were in charge of writing the band’s material, GUADALQUIVIR was not a guitar-dominated ensemble: the solid presence of the rhythm section and the melodic adornments delivered by flute/sax player Pedro Ontiveros turn out to be as important sonic factors as Olaegui and Cobo’s alternating leads. The original line-up recorded the band’s first two albums. After Cobo and Ontiveros left, the band went through a phase of slow activity; one more album was recorded eventually by the remaining members plus guests, though, in memory of the then recently departed Jesús de la Rosa (from TRIANA). After that, the band just split up officially and for good. Until this day, all ex-members keep themselves busy as session musicians, and some of them even launched prolific solo careers. 
Recommended to lovers of Flamenco-oriented prog, ICEBERG, GOTIC, jazz-rock and jazz-fusion, the “so-called” world music. ….~



In the second half of the 70’s, the Andalusian rock was a well that seemed to have no end. Flamenco and rock had melted into an embrace, and Guadalquivir with his arrival articulated their sound even more. 
Luis Cobo “Manglis” (Seville 1951), and Andrés Olaegui (El Puerto de Santa María 1951), both guitarists coincide in the military service and play in Seville in groups such as Manantial and Gong, which would be the seed of important later formations. 
When they arrive in Madrid, they record for other soloists and flamencos until Miguel Ríos calls them for their tour of the 77 “La noche roja” and for the album “Al Andalus” (Polydor 1977), where the two actively participate, among others, in the theme “Guadalquivir”, a poem by José Mata to the river of Seville. The idea was served, but before “Manglis” meets the flutist Pedro Ontiveros and the American Charlie Mariano. With the first he plays in “jams” in Ibiza, and with the second he goes to Germany where he collaborates with the progressive rock group Embryo, where a young Trilok Gurtu also collaborates. 
Upon returning to Madrid, Andrés and Luis recruit the young bassist Jaime Casado and the magnificent Larry Martín, on drums, for a concert in Móstoles with Triana, Gualberto and Imam before some 7,000 people. The success was evident, and the group began to play with or without Miguel Ríos throughout the country. 
In 1978 the group toured the national geography with a sensational concert at the Marbella Rock ‘78. The producer Rafael Gil, from Emi, bet on them and at the end of the season the debut album (a green vinyl !!) is published , reaching to sell more than 10,000 copies, while they were elected “revelation group of the year”. 
In this album is “Baila gitana”, its most popular song, with a clearly flamenco sound with Andrés and Luis challenging with Al Dimeola electric guitars with the contrast of Pedro to the soprano sax and a high voltage rhythm section. But there are also ballads in that first album: a song dedicated to “Manglis” or compositions like “Generalife”, more lyrical and poetic. 
Performances on TV and numerous live activities took place until 1980 when “Camino del Concert” was recorded, produced by themselves and with Tito Duarte on percussion. Being a good album, the formula seems difficult to overcome and “Manglis” decides to start his solo career, being called by Triana to accompany them as support guitarist. Pedro also leaves, and the group is in the hands of Andrés Olaegui who manages to recompose the band for the recording and editing of “After the silence”, an album recorded in memory of Jesús de la Rosa, by Triana, and featuring guest musicians as Pedro Ruy-Blas or Jorge Pardo among others. This third album was recorded for an independent label and goes unnoticed among the new “pop-rock” currents that take place in Madrid, 
The original line-up appears some twenty years later for festivals such as Lago de Bornos or the Flamenco Biennial of Seville. These last performances have been joined by a percussionist and Indian tabla, Nathan Kumar, who was already collaborating with Manglis alone. 
It was never easy in our country to succeed playing instrumental rock, but the achievements of Guadalquivir are there to be tasted, with a unique and especially Andalusian sound. It is a magnificent example of Andalusian rock made from Madrid, but with the heart of the south. His name has already been inscribed as a musical legend of our land. 
Both Manglis and Olaegui have developed solo works, the first one more aimed at ethnic tendencies, and the second one at flamenco-jazz…….~




GUADALQUIVIR was born as an idea, first, of the union and musical work of two guitarists from Seville, Andres Olaegui and Luis Cobo “Manglis” , both belonging to the musical avant-garde of rock that was forged in the city of Seville at the end of the 60s and that by pure chance coincidence both musicians agreed to do military service in Cerro Muriano and later in their respective destinations, the Cornetas and drums band of the Artillery Barracks No. 14 in Seville, replacing the 72. By the way, in that same cuatel they shared destiny with Marcos Mantero, keyboardist of the group Independent Caliphate Magnet, Eduardo Castro, journalist from Granada, and Rafael Alvarez “El Brujo”, actor, among other endearing companions of ranks. 
It is there where a great and inseparable friendship is forged and at the same time the guitar duo prelude to the future idea of ​​the group GUADALQUIVIR, and under the influences of Jazz Rock of the Mahavisnu Orchesta of John Mclaughlin, of Miles Davis and Weather Report, among others , begin to develop ideas and transform their styles of Rock / Blues guitarists, to the sources of Jazz / Rock, and that’s where they begin to compose music and develop their songs, forming the Manantial group together with the great American musicians Willy and Tony Trujillo, brothers both, drums and bassist, along with Puerto Rican flutist David Rodríguez, getting to record some demos and a performance on TVE on Sevillana Music at Popgrama, from Seville, and directed by the producer and presenter Gonzalo García PelayoThis was the first set of the group that Manglis and Olaegui had in mind. 
In 1977, after the recording of the album Al-Andalus, by Miguel Ríos, in which Olaegui and Manglis participate as composers, and in turn as guitarists, Luis Cobo “Manglis” marches along with Pedro Ontiveros and José Antonio Galicia to play in trio to Ibiza, and Andrés Olaegui stays in Madrid and is part of the band that would accompany Miguel Ríos on that summer tour. In Ibiza Manglis meets the bassist of the German group Embryo, Uwe Mulrich, who invites him to go to Munich to collaborate with the band. At the end of the summer of 77, Manglis went to Munich to work with the Embryo group and that’s where he meets the Indian percussionist Trilok Gurtu. 
Back in Madrid in January 1978, being one day at the Raíces club, birthplace of the Jazz Rock of the capital, José Varela, manager of the Triana group, proposes to Manglis and Olaegui to set up a group to take part in a festival of Andalusian groups that he was going to celebrate in Móstoles with Triana as headliner, joining Pedro Ontiveros, Larry Martin and Jaime Casado . It is there where they were given the opportunity to realize the group dream so longed for and that is where GUADALQUIVIR was born, which made its debut in front of 7,000 people at the “Festival de Mostoles” in February 1978, together with Imam, Storm, and Triana. 
Months later Miguel Ríos organizes the great summer tour “La Noche Roja” with the most leading groups of the time, with Triana as the headliner again, and GUADALQUIVIR is included in the tour, as well as the accompaniment group of Miguel Ríos, and as artists in the same Festival and tour “La Noche Roja”, which was held with great success in the summer of 1978. 
At the end of 1978 GUADALQUIVIR begins the recording between Barcelona and Madrid of its emblematic first album, “Guadalquivir”, indispensable in the discography of the Andalusian Rock. The Green Disc, as it was called, because the vinyl paste of the LP is green, is very appreciated and valued by collectors. 
After a year of intense live work where they managed to make a total of 90 concerts, of which we should highlight the Festival of Móstoles, Marbella Rock Festivals, Rock Jungle, Vitoria Jazz Festival , San Juan Evangelista , The tour of the Red Night, Monumental Theater of Madrid, Teatro Lope de Vega of Seville. GUADALQUIVIR is elected Revelation Group of the Year 1978, among other awards. 
In 1980 they record their 2nd Lp, “Camino del Concierto”, with abundant and excellent collaborations of friends, musicians and guest artists. After the Camino del Concierto tour, Manglis leaves GUADALQUIVIR and undertakes a solo stage, at the same time he is required by the Triana group as a guest guitarist in his concerts. 
Manglis is replaced by the keyboard player Javier Mora, a year later Pedro Ontiveros leaves the band and is replaced by Jaime Muela, and in some occasions Jorge Pardo and Pedro Ojesto collaborate, among others. 
In 1983 GUADALQUIVIR recorded his 3rd Lp, “After Silence”, without Manglis and without Ontiveros. Times were changing and the fashions of Madrid moved, and after the finery of the summer of 1983 and a tour of Poland, at the end of the year Guadalquivir decided to separate leaving behind 3 memorable records and the humble contribution made to history. of contemporaneous music and fusion of this country, and of course the Andalusian Rock. …..~



GUADALQUIVIR was born at the beginning of 1978 at the proposal of José VARELA , manager of TRIANA , who instructed Luis COBO , “ Manglis ”, to set up a group to participate in a festival at the Polideportivo de Móstoles (Madrid) with Andalusian groups and with TRIANA as headliner. This was his debut, in front of 7 thousand people, and with the groups STORM , GUALBERTO , IMÁN CALIFATO INDEPENDIENTE , GUADALQUIVIR and TRIANA . That same year, Miguel RÍOS organized a macro national rock tour that was called La Noche Roja, with leading groups of the time such asICEBERG , ATILA , SALVADOR , GUADALQUIVIR , Miguel RÍOS and TRIANA as headliner. By order of Miguel RÍOS , GUADALQUIVIR enters the tour with a double function, that of playing as GUADALQUIVIR and as an accompaniment group of Miguel RÍOS throughout the tour, since Manglis and Olaegui had collaborated on the album by Miguel RÍOS"Al Ándalus", as authors and guitarists. At the end of that year 1978 they recorded their debut album with the title “Guadalquivir”, the green vinyl, as it is known, being one of the most representative groups of Andalusian Rock. 
In its first year of history this band reaches 90 concerts, and was a revelation group from 1978. During the following two years GUADALQUIVIR were included in numerous festivals of the time such as Marbella Rock, Selva Rock in Palma de Mallorca, Salta Tapia in Seville, and they even participated in the 2nd Jazz Festival of Vitoria in 1978. Already in 1980, they released their second recording “Camino del Concierto”, with an important list of outstanding collaborations like those of Josep MAS KITFLUS , keyboardist of ICEBERG , Diego CARRASCO , Manolito SOLER , Talegón de Cordoba and Tito DUARTE , among others. After the summer tour, due to discrepancies with their classmates,Manglis leaves the band, starts his solo stage and records two albums: “Escalera al Cielo” and “Dandy”, at the same time he is required by the group TRIANA to play in his concerts as guitarist of the group between 1981 and 1983, until the fatal accident that cost the life of Jesus of the ROSA and the end of the stage of TRIANA . That same year 1983 the last recording of GUADALQUIVIR , without Manglis or Pedro ONTIVEROS, saxophonist of the group, disc entitled “After the Silence”, with radical change of the style more towards jazz. Although with great collaborations, he did not leave the mark of the first two, which are still sold today without ever being discontinued. A jewel of recordings, for any lover of Andalusian Rock. 
GUADALQUIVIR 3In 2006 and on the occasion of the Tribute to Historical Andalusian Rock, held in Montilla “Cordoba” Luis COBO takes up the return of this mythical and genuine band, along with some of his former colleagues and other new components. This instrumental music-making machine that is GUADALQUIVIR , embarks on a new era with the wisdom and experience gained through these thirty years of fusion, orienting with magical mastery the universal currents of jazz rock, flamenco and Indian music. An important appointment for this new stage of the band will take place at the Lago de Bornos Festival 2007 in the village of Bornos in the Sierra de Cadiz, on April 28, 2007 with the following poster: CAI , GUADALQUIVIR eIMAN CALIFATO INDEPENDIENTE , groups that were each, by themselves, maximum exponents of the culture and avant-garde movement of Andalusian music of the late 70’s and early 80’s……~ 



Guadalquivir was an Andalusian jazz-rock band , which was active between 1978 and 1984 . They met again in 2006 . It is part of the so-called Andalusian rock, although it appears in the last period of that current. In front of groups such as Triana, Alameda or Imam, who developed their work influenced by the tradition of symphonic rock, Guadalquivir comes from jazz influences and, therefore, his work is part of jazz fusion , although with the characteristics of Andalusian rock ( use of rhythms related to flamenco, especially bulería and rumba, the development of solos with the presence of flamenco phrases and melismas and the use of “Andalusian” images and mythology in themes and titles) 
Guadalquivir begins to emerge as a group of the idea of Sevillian guitarists Andrés Olaegui (Sevilla 1951) and Luis Cobo (Manglis) (Puerto de Santa María 1951), after agreeing and performing military service in Cerro Muriano (Córdoba) and later transfer to Seville to the Cornetas and Drums Band of the Artillery Barracks No. 14 of Seville. In that same barracks they shared fate with Marcos Mantero, keyboardist of the group Independent Caliphate Imam, Eduardo Castro, journalist from Granada, and Rafael Álvarez “El Brujo”, actor, among other dear companions in the ranks. Although Manglis and Olaegui already knew each other before, that’s where a sincere friendship was born and since then inseparable friends.
It is at Cerro Muriano where they begin to listen to Miles Davis, the Mahavíshnu Orchestra, Whater Report, Chick Correa and many other free jazz groups . In their spare time they begin to exchange ideas, experiencing a metamorphosis in the styles of both guitarists who managed the American blues, to get inside and drink from the sources of the nascent musical style: jazz rock . And it is at Cerro Muriano where they begin to compose songs and decide to form a guitar duo, with the aim of capturing their ideas and making them in the future, with the great dream of both musicians to assemble a powerful jazz rock band with Andalusian sound. 
Already in Seville in their free time of military destiny, they founded the group Manantial along with the brothers Willie and Tony de Trujillo and David Rodríguez. Willie (drums) and Tony (bassist) were children of Sevillian parents but settled in New York, where both were born, studied and trained as instrumentalists. They had a studio and a great sound equipment. David Rodríguez was a flutist from Puerto Rico, who was passing through Seville. 
Manantial performed only two concerts and the most relevant was a live performance on the TVE program Popgrama, directed by Gonzalo García Pelayo, within the report that was made about what happened musically in Seville for the year 1974. 
Once the military service is over, Manglis and Andrés Olaegui decide to go to Madrid with Manantial to try their luck, and after a month without achieving the objectives set for the group, Willie and Tony go back to Seville, and Manglis and Olaegui, decide to stay in Madrid to keep trying. At that time they frequented the  Balboa Jazz Club , where they met and became friends with Jorge Pardo, Pedro Ruy-Blas and José Antonio Galicia, who performed at this club every day, and entered into what was the world of jazz in the capital of Spain, hand in hand with these great musicians. 
In 1977 , after the recording of the album Al-Andalus , by Miguel Ríos , in which Olaegui and Manglis participate as composers , and in turn as guitarists , Luis Cobo “Manglis” marches along with Pedro Ontiveros and José Antonio Galicia to play in trio to Ibiza, and Andrés Olaegui stays in Madrid and is part of the band that would accompany Miguel Ríos on that summer tour. In Ibiza Manglis meets the bassist of the German group Embryo, Uwe Mulrich, who invites him to go to Munich to collaborate with the band. At the end of the summer of 77, Manglis left for Munich to collaborate with the Embryo group and that’s where he meets the Indian percussionist Trilok Gurtu. 
One night in January 1978 , José Valera , who was the first manager of the Triana group, proposes Luis Cobo -Manglis-, at the Club Raíces , in Madrid, where Manglis was playing, to set up a group to participate in a Festival with Andalusian rock bands that I was organizing with Triana as headliner. It is here, finally, that for the first time the great opportunity to create the long-awaited dream band, with its own musical compositions and that could present it in the right space, is opened, but the wait was long but it had its reward. Along with the two guitarists, they make up the group: Pedro Ontiveros (sax and flute), Larry Martín (drums) and Jaime Casado (bass). 
And this is how in February 1978 , and after twenty days of marathon ten-hour trials, Guadalquivir debuted before 7,000 at the Móstoles Rock Festival with Andalucian bands and together with Triana, Independent Caliphate Imam and The Storm. 
Months later, Miguel Ríos organizes the great summer tour “La Noche Roja” with the most important groups of the moment, with Triana as the main attraction in the poster, and in which Guadalquivir is also offered, participating twice, already that first Guadalquivir appeared as a group doing their concert and two hours later they did it accompanying Miguel Ríos’ concert. More than one hundred thousand people attended the seven large scheduled concerts, which were performed for the first time in Spain with sound equipment and English technicians, with fakir included and the exposure of a laser beam for the first time seen in this country in a show. 
In the first year of their appearance they participate in ninety concerts. That same year, they filmed for the company EMI and made the recording of their first LP: “Guadalquivir” (EMI, 1978), with the same title as the name of the band. This LP, which comes on the market with green vinyl, at the beginning of 1979, and that collectors called “the green disc”. The band is named revelation group that same year, coming to participate from the Jazz Festival of Vitoria, the Selva Rock de Mallorca, and countless festivals such as Marbella Rock and a long etcetera, which make this group one of the essentials in the festivals and parties of the summers from 1978 to 1983 and one of the mythical pillars of the history of Andalusian rock. 
In this album is “Baila gitana”, its most popular song, with a clearly flamenco sound with Andrés and Luis challenging with the electric guitars with the contrast of Pedro to the saxophone-soprano and a rhythmic section of high voltage. There are also ballads on that first album: a song dedicated to “Manglis” or compositions like “Generalife”, more lyrical and poetic. 
In 1980 they recorded their second LP: “Camino del Concierto” (EMI, 1980). This disc presents outstanding collaborations like those of Josep Mas Kitflus (keyboardist of Iceberg), Diego Carrasco, Manolito Soler, Talegón de Córdoba and Tito Duarte, among others. After finishing the tour of this album, in 1981, Luis Cobo Manglis, leaves the group very much in spite of himself, due to divergences with some members of the band, and embarks on a solo stage, founding the band Manglis with which he will record two albums (’ Stairway to Heaven 'and’ Dandy ’); Triana in turn requires him as a guitarist, between 1981 and 1983, until the fatal accident that cost Jesús de la Rosa his life and the end of Triana’s stage. 
Guadalquivir edits a third LP, in memory of Jesús de la Rosa, “After the Silence” (Caskabel, 1983) with the Caskabel label, and without two of its original founders and members, Luis Cobo “Manglis” and Pedro Ontiveros (who left the group one year after Manglis did) where we can highlight a radical change of style more towards jazz. 
Manglis is replaced by keyboard player Javier Mora, Pedro Ontiveros by Jaime Muela, and in some cases Jorge Pardo and Pedro Ojesto collaborate, among others. 
Finally the times were changing and the fashions of Madrid moved and after a stage of concerts and a tour of Poland, the group dissolved in 1984. 
After almost thirty years of the band’s founding, Luis Cobo (“Manglis”) reorganized the Guadalquivir group again, again with Andrés Olaegui and Pedro Ontiveros and reappear in the Homage to Rocker Merit organized by the La Abuela Rock Cultural Association in Montilla (Córdoba), along with Medina Azahara, Manuel Imán and Smash in April 2006 . They also participate in the Bornos Lake Festival, in 2007, along with Cai and Imán Califato Independiente, and in the XV edition of the Seville Flamenco Biennial where the 30th anniversary of Andalusian Rock is celebrated on September 20, 2008 in the auditorium Rocío Jurado, along with Manuel Molina, Smash, Tabletom, Lole and Manuel, Alameda, Cai and other important names in Andalusian rock. ……~ 




Guadalquivir “Guadalquivir”  1978  first album reviews

Guadalquivir emerged in the Andalusian city of Córdoba in large part as a reaction of Luis Cobo, who was encouraged by the members of the Trio Sevillian Triana, good friends, to express their creativity in the context of a group. Associating with four other musicians, the band began to cultivate a genuinely flamenco rock, oriented mainly towards the paths of jazz fusion, with the influence of Return to Forever and the Weather Report post-1974. The duet of guitars, in conjunction with the vientista’s Arabic flourishes, make up an infinite series of enveloping melodies, played with enthusiasm, but without overwhelming the listener with infinite solos: rather, a moderate space is left for the soloists to shine without cover the brightness of the melody itself, letting appear a subtle dose of roughness in the sound. The rhythm section, on the other hand, works very smoothly through the intricate flamenco rhythms, rescuing its typical color in the context of jazz. All the tracks of this album, composed by each of the guitarists alternately, keep a fairly even level, so it is difficult to choose one that stands out individually. We will limit ourselves to mentioning that there are openly festive themes, such as 'Generalife’, 'Baila Gitana’ and 'Dominga’; also others with a more measured mood, so to speak more introspective, such as the opening theme 'Guadalquivir’, and also 'Cartagena’, whose relaxed textures give the listener an opportune moment of relaxation in the midst of so much rhythmic boiling. In short, an extremely beautiful and enveloping album, in which the musicians dominate the intricate melodies and rhythms with an absolute solvency: recommendable. ….~

At the end of 1978, after a marathon year of debut with ninety concerts and after obtaining the recognition of public and specialized press, they undertake between Barcelona and Madrid the recording of their first LP with the same title and name of the band, for the label Harbert -EMI-, released in the spring of 1979. This record would become essential in the history of Andalusian rock , pressing itself as a curious note in green vinyl, so it would later be recognized and called the green disc . This recording gathers all the imaginative strength of the compositions of its two Guadalquivir guitarists: Andres Olaegui and Luis Cobo -Manglis-, together with the instrumental quality of all the musicians and founders of the band.
With an Andalusian jazz rock cut , the instrumentals that make up the content of this recording transport us to a formula very different from those used by established bands of the time, as is the case of the Triana group , which that same year swept the stages. The proposal of the first long play of Guadalquivir, without a doubt, it is the freshness and beauty in the sound of the compositions, together with the powerful musical quality of its members, collected as it is appreciated, in the seven themes included in this first work in the group’s studio. The album was recorded by: Luis Cobo -Manglis- and Andres Olaegui on guitars, Pedro Ontiveros: saxophones and flute, Larry Martín: drums and Jaime Casado: electric bass guitar. In addition to this group’s own staff, Manolo Marinelli, from the Alameda group, will also be involved in the keyboards; Rubén Dantas, percussion, and flamenco guitarist Diego Carrasco .

Recording done at the Emi Studios of Barcelona by the engineers Manolo Moreno, and Luis Calleja at the Kirios studios in Madrid, with arrangements and musical production by the Guadalquivir themselves……by Julián Molero …fonoteca….~
What an excellent starting point for Guadalquivir! This Andalusian instrumental quintet really hit an all-time high with their eponymous debut album. Heavily influenced by Return to Forever and post-74 Weather Report, Guadalquivir stood musically closer to Iceberg and Gotic than to their neighbor bands Imán, Cai, Mezquita and others: the reason for this is that Guadalquivir stuck to the logic of jazz fusion and kept itself apart from the symphonic prog realms. The repertoire is solid and very energetic, but its power is not based on the use of two guitars: in fact, the band keeps its rocking potential in a very subtle level, concentrating on the fusion trend: every melodic dialogue is sustained by the sax/flute player and one of the guitarists. Meanwhile the effective rhythm due steals some of the limelight with their superb transmission of Flamenco’s intense cadence. It is also noticeable that the Spanish guitar is not very present in the band’s overall sound (it is featured in some specific places), but still, the Flamenco roots are expanded all over the melodic lines and their subsequent arrangements. The track that kicks off the album (named after the band and the album) is quite solemn, as if the band was leaving the listener some time for relaxation before the explosion of color and rhythm takes place in most of the remaining pieces. 'Baila Gitana’ is all about that, and so is 'Generalife’, which IMHO is one of the most prominent numbers in the album: both are real Guadalquivir classics in the minds of those who got to know and love them in the late 70s. In between, the soaring 'Cartagena’ brings a moment of solace and magical introspection: listening to this track is like watching a landscape in your inner soul. The use of some smooth string arrangements and the presence of a guest piano player helps to add some majesty to the track’s ambience. The last three tracks are the most explosive, finding the band flirting softly with the typical textures of Latin jazz: the band makes recurrent use of the structure of rumba flamenca (a kind of Flamenco closely related to the sensuality of Tropical American folk) in order to keep a solid focus on the increased intensity. 'El Manglis’ includes a splendid bass guitar solo, and 'Dominga’ starts with a brief prologue of dual Spanish guitars and hand clapping (true to their roots!). 'La Danza de los Tigres’ keeps the same trend with added touches of bossanova: the emotion of Flamenco and the frenzy of Brazilian Carnival together make an exciting mixture of energies. In short, “Guadalquivir” is an excellent album from an excellent band…. by Cesar Inca ….~ 
Luis Cobo was one of the leading figures of the still nebulous Rock Andaluz of the early seventies. He played guitar with Gong, a Seville-based band that helped to light the blue touch paper of the movement and which also included Manuel Marinelli (Alameda) and Juan Jose Palacios (Triana) in its line-up. Cobo later formed Guadalquivir, a band that epitomised the jazzier side of Rock Andaluz with its melange of Classic Fusion, flamenco, Arabic melodies and Latin rhythms.
Released at the height of the movement in 1978, Guadalquivir’s self-titled debut is a collection of seven tone poems that evoke vivid mental images of the landscape, people and culture of Andalusia in southern Spain. It’s an entirely instrumental work that features the twin lead guitars of Cobo and Andrés Olaegui, although saxophonist Pedro Ontiveros is in no way subordinate to this pair. One criticism I’ve read of the album is that it’s a bit too smooth at times. Maybe, but when these guys get things right they really kick butt.
The title-track opens with jangling 12-string electric guitar and proceeds with as many twists and turns as the great river from which it takes its name. The music then delves into the region’s social history with 'Baila Gitana’ (Gypsy Dance) and its Arabic-sounding saxophone ornaments. The Romani people of Spain are known as Gitanos and flamenco has been at the heart of their culture in Andalusia for centuries. Luis Cobo was himself born in the Triana barrio of Seville, a district that traditionally had a large Romani population.
Named for the country estate of the last Moorish dynasty in Spain, 'Generalife’ is as peerless a wonder as its namesake’s gardens. The naturalistic concept is accompanied by outstanding flute and guitar licks ably supported by a syncopated polyrhythmic figure of palmas (hand claps) and drums. The different peoples of Andalusia have contributed to its rich cultural heritage and melting pot of varied ethnic components but on 'El Manglis’ - Luis Cobo’s nickname - there’s a strong Santana influence with a smouldering guitar lead and busy percussion.
Guadalquivir drew some wonderful sketches of Spain on this album and I just hope it’s not another six years before I see it reviewed again on PA….by seventhsojourn ……~ 
  The Guadalquivir River is an almost 700-kilometer-long river, which rises in the Spanish Cordilleras, flows through the Lower Andalusian Basin and then through Seville, and then flows into the Gulf of Cadiz. After Andalusia’s lifeline, Andrés Olaegui and Luis Cobo, two guitarists who made a name for themselves in the Iberian flamenco / folk, jazz and fusion scene in the 1970s, named their band founded in Seville in 1978. In the same year appeared here to be reviewed, self-titled debut of the formation.
Although Guadalquivir was founded by two guitarists, the music of the band is not particularly guitar-dominated, rather the sax and flute Pedro Ontiveros are in the foreground. Usually, however, all participants equally create a balanced, complex structure of jazz, rock, restrained symphoprog and flamenco and folklore elements. Acoustic flamenco guitars are surprisingly rare to hear (clearly only at the beginning of “Dominga” and less clearly in “Cartagena”). Nevertheless, the music depends on a distinct Iberian element, dance-like, folkloric expressions, away Arabic-sounding phrases and a relaxed lightness, which are often found in jazz rock productions from Spain and Italy. Loose and peppy music is played here, guitars, Bass and a versatile percussion, sax and flute rock very jazz-oriented there, filled with the more restrained e-piano. In “Cartagena” there are also a few discreet string lines, which scrape dangerously close to the border with sweet lard. Even otherwise, the sounds on “Guadalquivir” often get straight into some pleasing mainstream vocals and thus become in danger of being shallow and melodious. There are hardly any corners and edges here. Nevertheless, the music is quite entertaining, especially if it ripples in the background. Even otherwise, the sounds on “Guadalquivir” often get straight into some pleasing mainstream vocals and thus become in danger of being shallow and melodious. There are hardly any corners and edges here. Nevertheless, the music is quite entertaining, especially if it ripples in the background. Even otherwise, the sounds on “Guadalquivir” often get straight into some pleasing mainstream vocals and thus become in danger of being shallow and melodious. There are hardly any corners and edges here. Nevertheless, the music is quite entertaining, especially if it ripples in the background.
“Guadalquivir” is a very nice and colorful album with Spanish fusion, which did not turn out to be extremely exciting, but on which is played very virtuoso and quality. Anyone who appreciates jazz rock that does not always have to be highly complex and edgy, especially those with a Mediterranean atmosphere, can definitely listen to it here. Conclusion: Nice, but in the long run maybe a bit boring!….by.. Achim Breiling..babyblaueprog…..~

Line-up / Musicians- Andrés Olaegui / electric 6 & 12 string guitars, acoustic guitar, vocal on 3
- Jaime Casado / fretted & fretless basses
- Pedro Ontiveros / soprano & alto saxes, flute
- Luis Cobo / electric 6 & 12 string guitars, acoustic guitar, anvil on 3
- Larry Martin / drums, timbales

Additional musicians:
- Manuel Marinelli / piano (3), Fender piano (6), Solina (7)
- Diego Carrasco / Spanish guitar (6)
- Rubén Dantas / perucssion (3, 5, 7)
- String quartet on 3
- Hand clappers on 4 and 6
Tracklist
Guadalquivir 5:16
Baila Gitana 5:30
Cartagena 6:48
Generalife 6:41
El Manglis 7:05
Dominga 6:20
La Danza De Los Tigres 7:14 






Guadalquivir ‎ “Camino Del Concierto” 1980 second album reviews

Guadalquivir’s second album turns out to be as magnificent and beautiful as their impressive debut recording, if only with a more polished sound production and a more colorful sonic palette - the latter factor was achieved due to the use of a number of occasional guests on additional percussion, horns and synthesizer (Josep Mas, from Iceberg, delivers some amazing solos for two tracks). The namesake opening track is very soft, evocative, with a pleasant jazz-pop feel in it. 'Ostalinda’ and 'Esclavos de la Belleza’ are the most similar to the first album’s overall vibe, and indeed, they are outstanding highlights of this album; between the two, the 3-minute 'Flor de Almendro’ (performed on 2 acoustic guitars and flute) serves as a serene interlude that fills the air with melancholic nuances. So far, so good, and as we keep on going through the second half of “Camino del Concierto”, things continue to be quite exciting. 'Cartuja’ and '121 Hormigas’ are catchy, joyful numbers constructed under a Flamenco-meets Latin jazz frame, a strategy that is enhanced further in the more joyful closure 'Noche de Verbena’. On the other hand, 'El Vuelo de una Lágrima’ pays an accurate homage to its title ('A Tear’s Flight’) with its languid cadence: a special mention goes to the soaring guitar solo that starts at 1:30, which helps to create the track’s overall spirit. As usual, the rhythm section delivers a terrific job, which is especially splendid on tracks 4, 6 & 8. Generally speaking, “Camino del Concierto” is not as excellent as its antecessor, but it still deserves to be labeled as better than 'simply good’: Guadalquivir’s ability to create captivating melodies and refurbish them with clever arrangements remain intact, and so does their capacity to recycle that old Flamenco magic with their solid interplaying. This album is another winner from the history of Spanish progressive rock and jazz fusion…. by Cesar Inca ….~

This is a really enjoyable jazz rock album with flamenco flavor. As in the case of other fusion bands there is no voice which is not a bad thing but the contrary. Sometime maybe it’s better to let the instruments speaking and the listener to enjoy.
After a first intro song - Camino del Concierto - we have Ostalinda which is my favorite one. A really good example of jazz rock song as it should be: fast tempos, good mixing of all the instruments and a very good atmosphere. Flor De Almendro - is a guitar/flute driven song which sounds also really good. The albums continues with Esclavos De La Belleza when mainly then man behind the sax demonstrates his abilities(but also the guitars or the drummer). It is the longest song and probably one of the best composition s of Guadalquivir. The other songs have the same level so I invite you to discover them. One observation for - El Vuelo De Una Lagrima - a really romantic song which you will probably want to play in order to make nice atmosphere.
For sure this is nothing very original because the influences from the fusion masters are somehow evident I would say(e.g. Return to Forever, Al Di Meola). But it still remains a very good and well played album and for me this is one of those albums I will probably always like to listen in order to change my mood in a bad day.
So, once again, greetings from Spain from a band which really deserves his place in fusion genre. Give it a try and you will probably also enjoy it….by petrica…~

Inbetween the virgin and the sophomore Guadalquivir albums the Spaniards played about 100 lives with great success and received a few awards for their unique sound.“Camino del concierto” (1980, Harvest) features the original line-up surrounded by a cool guest list, including Pedro Ruy-Blas on bongos, Iceberg’s Josep Mas on synthesizer, Diego Carrasco on spanish guitar, Tito Duarte on additional sax and José Medrano on trumpet.All these guest artists and the year of release had some minor impact to the band’s sound, which had become slightly less inventive, more slick and commercial, obtaining a melodious, tropical Andalusian-spiced Fusion sound.On the other hand the skillful set-up and the mood for dense, instrumental music led to series of professional performances with incredible instrumental interactions, flavored by the first-time introduced synth, trumpet and double sax stylings.Some great tracks in here with both soft and richer tunes, always breezing a strange Spanish/Latin vibe and delivered through tons of very good solos, jazzy rhythms and acoustic textures.I do not regard this to be as good as the rawer debut, still a nice example of well-executed Iberian Jazz Fusion…..by….apps79 ….~

This recording was made in the Eurosonic studios of Madrid in 1980 with much more budget and technical means than the previous one and includes the proposal already expressed in his previous work, but with a precision and execution if it is more calculated, and definitively establishing its sound inside of the broad spectrum of Andalusian rock , with affinities to international jazz rock , resembling its style to Wather Report or Chik Corea.
For the recording of this “Camino del Concierto” (EMI, 1980), they have the collaboration of great musicians and friends such as: Josep Mas Kitflus, keyboardist of Iceberg , Tito Duarte , Pedro Ruy-Blas , Luis Fornés-Them, along with the flamencos Diego Carrasco , Manuel Soler and Talegón de Cordoba, they would carry out this new and interesting second work, of study of the Guadalquivir group , that maintains the same formation that in its debut LP: “Guadalquivir” (EMI, 1979) ; that is, Manglis and Andrés on guitars, Pedro on alto saxophones, tenor and flute, Jaime on bass and Larry Martín on drums.
The recording was made at Eurosonic Studios, in Madrid, by engineer Pepe Loeches, with arrangements and musical production of Guadalquivir…..by Julián Molero ….la fonoteca….~
In the fall of 1979 Guadalquivir recorded their second album in Madrid, which was released in 1980 on the Harvest label of the EMI. Although the band here are supported by a whole load of guest musicians, including Josep Mas Kitflus on the synthesizer, one can not say that “Camino del concierto” would offer much different music than the Spaniard’s debut album.
Also on “Camino del concierto” there is a loose-fluffy, Mediterranean jazz rock to hear, which, mainly due to the occasional, flamencoinspirierten acoustic guitar inserts receives an Iberian atmosphere. However, the music is dominated, at least when it comes to the solos, by Pedro Ontiveros on sax and flute, although there are also some sections in which the two electric guitarists agitate around each other. Of Javier Mora and the two other key pressers (piano and synthesizer) apparently present at the recording sessions, apart from a few, short solo pads or inconspicuous background gimmicks, not much to hear. Rather, the double-staffed guitars, bass and the extensive percussion section provide for a dense jazz rock netting, in the occasional solos are interspersed. Occasionally, ontiveros and the two blowing guests almost cause a brass rock atmosphere.
“Camino del concierto” offers virtuoso, more relaxed Iberojazzrock, which is occasionally a little too complacent. The clearly existing, Iberian element and the extensive guitar department but ensure that the bidding does not drift into irrelevant Mainstreamfusiongefilde. Anyone who appreciates Mediterranean fusion of jazz and rock and does not expect any big surprises can safely access it here.
The two EMI albums by Guadalquivir have also been re-released on a double CD by Rama Lama Music titled “Todas sus grabaciones para discos EMI”….by.. Achim Breiling..babyblaueprog…..~

Credits

Bass Guitar – Jaime Casado
Bongos – Pedro Ruy Blas*
Drums – Larry Martin (6)
Electric Guitar – Andrés Olaegui
Electric Guitar, Acoustic Guitar [Ovation] – Luis Cobo “Manglis”
Guitar [Spanish], Handclaps – Diego Carrasco
Piano [Acoustic] – Luis Fornes*
Saxophone [Soprano, Alto], Flute – Pedro Ontiveros
Saxophone [Tenor], Tambourine – Tito Duarte
Synthesizer [Yamaha Polyphonic] – Kitflus
Trumpet – José Medrano*

Tracklist
Camino Del Concierto 5:34
Ostalinda 5:07
Flor De Almendro 3:15
Esclavos De La Belleza 7:45
Cartuja 4:00
121 Hormigas 5:14
El Vuelo De Una Lágrima 4:01
Noche De Verbena 6:59 


















Original lineup :
Luis Cobo “Manglis” - guitar
Andrés Olaegui - guitar
Pedro Ontiveros - sax and flute
Jaime Casado - bass
Larry Martín - drums. 

Second formation:
Andrés Olaegui - guitar
Javier Mora - keyboards
Jaime Muela - flute
Jaime Casado - bass
Larry Martín - drums 

Third formation:
Luis Cobo “Manglis” - guitar
Andrés Olaegui - guitar
Pedro Ontiveros - sax and flute
Jose Ramón Abella - bass
Nantha Kumar - percussion
Valentin Iturad - drums 











Discography   
Guadalquivir (EMI-Harvest, 1978) 
Road to the concert (EMI-Harvest, 1980) 
After the silence (Caskabel, 1983) 

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