Tuesday, 3 July 2018

Kashmere Stage Band ‎ “Texas Thunder Soul 1968-1974” 2006, 2 × CD, 2xLP, Compilation, 2011 3xLP Compilation US Soul Jazz Funk


Kashmere Stage Band ‎ “Texas Thunder Soul 1968-1974” 2006, 2 × CD, 2xLP, Compilation, 2011 3xLP Compilation   US Soul Jazz Funk
Kashmere Stage Band on google+ with killer sound

Texas Thunder Soul 1968-1974 full dezeer

https://www.deezer.com/es/album/14558090

Texas Thunder Soul 1968-1974 full spotify

https://open.spotify.com/album/4bn5ct5jEmBPnlmYvYGJFP


The story of the Kashmere Stage Band and its director, Conrad Johnson, is a heart-warming and inspiring story. It shows what a teacher and students can accomplish if they meet each other half-way. 

The booklet included in this compilation is very insightful and includes an interview with Prof Johnson. The DVD includes three short documentaries that show the acquisition of the recordings, an appearance on a local Houston TV show, and an interview with Prof Johnson, which also includes footage of the band’s trip to Europe. 

Then there is the music … the musicianship is stellar. It’s hard to believe you are listening to high school students! If you’ve ever attended a school music festival you’ll understand why this group stood out! The music is definitely tight, funky, and inspired. Grooves abound, horns blaze, and guitars riff. However, 40-plus years later the music also sounds a little dated. The songs reflect the times in which the band was at its peak (1968-1974). Played back to back, the songs begin to sound the same; almost redundant. Several songs are instrumental versions of pop hits from that period. Other songs are horn riffs with unison parts, and Prof Johnson supplied a good amount of originals. 
The Kashmere Stage Band was definitely unique for its time. In some ways, even ground breaking. This compilation represents a moment in time in which we can reminisce, as well as relish the accomplishments of a talented and caring teacher and his willing and talented students…..by…. Mark S. Crawford…


The tireless dollar-bin scourers over at Stones Throw have assembled yet another astonishingly packaged collection of funk rarities in the form of Texas Thunder Soul, an exhaustive two-disc overview of the phenomenal Kashmere Stage Band, a Houston High School band who churned out some of the heaviest funk ever recorded during their all-too-brief lifetime. Masterminded by bandleader Conrad O. Johnson, who worked up funky big-band arrangements of pop hits and soul classics for his young charges, the Kashmere Stage Band boasted a truly monstrous sound that continues to astound after the passage of nearly four decades. The band’s storming take on “Super Bad” alone makes this record a must-own, but though the Kashmere Stage Band were stellar interpreters of other people’s material, the presence of a couple of funky original tunes, like the bass heavy “Headwiggle,” makes a strong case for Conrad Johnson’s songwriting skills. A truly unique record and a compelling slice of musical history, Texas Thunder Soul sheds light on a previously forgotten chapter of soul history…..~


We’re proud to present the deluxe edition of the Texas Thunder Soul 1968- 1974 anthology – to be released in conjunction with the Jamie Foxx-produced, award-winning documentary Thunder Soul: The True Story of Conrad Johnson and the Kashmere Stage Band. Texas Thunder Soul 1968- 1974 is presented both as a 3LP/DVD and a 2CD/DVD package; both packages include the short-films “Texas Jewels: The Making of Texas Thunder Soul” (by B+ and Flying Lotus) and “Prof. and his Band: A Documentary by Charles Porter” alongside a performance of the Kashmere Stage Band on the 1972 special “Jazz: Yesterday, Today, Forever.” 

We’ve been saying it since the release of The Funky 16 Corners back in 2001 but, after Thunder Soul captured the audience award at festivals like SXSW and the Los Angeles Film Festival, the word is out: Kashmere was the greatest high school band – ever. Their story is tucked in between slabs of hard 70s funk, soul, and jazz; Conrad Johnson transformed a bunch of rough-hewn high schoolers into a band that could compete with any in the nation – professional, or otherwise. Forget high school bands, we’re talking about sixteen year old kids who would give the JBs a run for their money. 

The Kashmere Stage Band released a total of eight albums and three 45s on Johnson’s Kram label. The band’s best tracks are collected here alongside producer Eothen “Egon” Alapatt’s expanded booklet, with updated liner notes and essays, more rare photos and ephemera….Now Again Records….~



High school bands are typically something you are subjected to, not something you seek. The Kashmere Stage Band was an exception. Bestowed with the unequivocal title of “Best Stage Band in the Nation,” the Houston high schoolers were something to behold. Led by Conrad O. Johnson, a mentor better known as “Prof”, they dominated the high school band competition circuit and gained international recognition. This two-CD plus DVD set documents their 1968 to 1974 reign as the only high school band that mattered. 

The stage band played heavy funk instrumentals, with a chorus of horns shouting over muted porno guitar, percolating bassline and drums that beat out the high-energy vibe that over-scores all of the KSB music. No smooth keyboards—only strings, brass and beats. Their output was sophisticated and wild—rough in pose but expert in performance. Like good students they took turns, clearing the way for a flute solo or a busy guitar lead like that of “Do Your Thing”. 
From the familiar funk of “Shaft” and “Thank You” to originals like “Headwiggle” and “Can You Dig It Man?”, the set-list on Texas Thunder Soul is exquisite. It includes both studio takes and live cuts originally produced and released by “Prof” Johnson on his KRAM label. The personnel on these recording varies from track to track for obvious reasons, but all of them sound like they were cut from the same cloth and that is testament to the teaching of Johnson. This “expanded deluxe edition” of Texas Thunder Soul is basically the same as the version released in 2006 except that it has updated liner notes that tenderly acknowledge Prof’s passing and a bonus DVD. 

The DVD is essential, but so limited. It features a poorly produced short entitled “Texas Jewels–The Making of Texas Thunder Soul,” in which Now-Again Records honcho Egon crate-digs through the abandoned residence of saxophonist and record-maker Leon Mitchison. The disc also includes a slideshow of the Kashmere Stage band performing on “Jazz: Yesterday, Today, Forever.” But the diamond in this rough is the antique mini-doc “Prof. and his Band”, which really explores Conrad Johnson’s wisdom and leadership and features the some of the best performance footage taken of the KSB. In that segment we hear Prof reveal his intentions, “I got the idea to start a band and build a band out of young people that was equivalent in sound and in appearance to that of the professionals.” He did that alright, and he may have broke the shoulders of the giants he stood on, for the Kashmere Stage Band was a heavy force. Powerful, perhaps from the guidance of Conrad or maybe it was the fire of youth, but either way it amounted to some of the best funk ever carved into wax.. 

“In Houston, Texas, Conrad O. Johnson pursued a lofty goal with his stage band at Kashmere High School, a predominantly black school located in the city’s north end (referred to in Houston as “Kashmere Gardens”). He wanted to lead not only the best high school stage band in Texas, but the best high school stage band in the world. Our opinion is that he succeeded, and we’re thankful that he thoroughly documented his band’s progress, so that we can present to you the Kashmere Stage Band’s musical legacy. 

In the mid ’60s through the ’70s, in Houston’s bustling metropolis, Johnson (known by many as “Prof.”) made a career of producing leagues of musicians capable of playing competitively with any band in the nation, professional or otherwise. More than simply a product of the big band era (his childhood friends and early musical peers included legends like Illinois Jacquet and Arnette Cobb), Johnson bestowed a living history to his young students. And while many band directors simply tolerated the use of popular rhythms in their stage bands, Johnson embraced the funk movement that enveloped his kids. He encouraged composition – both by writing original funk songs for his band to perform and by allowing the Kashmere Band to play songs written by band members.  

Never one to succumb to novelty, Johnson didn’t simply throw funk beats beneath a jazz song to please his kids. He instructed his band to play funk because he respected the funk idiom in the same way he respected jazz. Nor did he simply borrow charts from progressive big banders such as Herman, as was common amongst high school bandleaders from the era. He arranged nearly every one of his band’s songs himself, and those that he didn’t arrange he allowed his students to arrange. He worked year-round with his eager charges, constantly pushing the limits as to what their band could accomplish. He built the Kashmere Stage Band from scratch and his winning combination of powerful funk rhythms beneath expertly executed jazz solos quickly influenced those bandleaders directly within his sphere and those he met – and almost always bested – in competitions across the world.”.. 

The Kashmere Stage Band was a very successful high school jazz-funk band that existed from the late 1960s through 1977 in the North Houston area of Kashmere Gardens. The group was founded by Conrad O. Johnson who was the bandleader of Kashmere High School. Conrad “Prof” Johnson was born on November 15, 1915, in Victoria, Texas, and moved with his family to Houston when he was nine. Johnson studied music at Houston College and later at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, before graduating from there in 1938. Johnson’s teaching career began in 1941, where he taught marching band. He later became a jazz band instructor at Houston’s Booker T. Washington High School, where he remained until moving to Kashmere High School by 1969. 
“Prof” Johnson taught the band to blend funk rhythms with big-band jazz in order to create a unique sound especially designed for live performances and competitions. According to former student Joe Carmouche, Johnson worked long hours on evenings and weekends to help his students perfect their sound. He also did the arranging for the musical works, composed some of the pieces himself (including the band’s showcase piece “Kashmere”), and enlisted the ideas of his students. Because he and his students were so committed, the Kashmere Stage Band quickly gained a reputation for high-quality performances, and it dominated local competition and won national championships. Between 1969 and 1978, the Kashmere Stage band won 42 out of 46 contests in which it participated and was voted “Most Outstanding Band in the Nation” at the 1972 All-American Stage Band contest held in Mobile, Alabama. 
In 1969 Johnson took the band into the studio to record its first album, Our Thing. According to Johnson, he hoped the album would provide students with a souvenir of the music they had created, and, it would help establish high standards for future students to follow. In all the Kashmere Stage Band recorded eight albums and three 45 rpm records between 1969 and 1978 on Johnson’s own Kram Records label. They toured Europe in 1973. That same year Houston’s mayor designated an official “Kashmere Stage Band Day.” In 1975 the band toured Japan. His students, predominantly African-American teenagers, gained valuable performance experience; while some band members went on to become professional musicians, most made their livelihoods in other careers. 
After more than thirty years of teaching jazz in Houston schools, Conrad Johnson retired by 1978. This brought to an end the Kashmere Stage Band although the legacy that he created continued well into the twenty-first century. Kashmere High School became home to the Conrad O. Johnson School of Fine Arts, a Houston ISD magnet school program. Furthermore, the Kashmere Stage Band’s recordings have been in high demand, especially by hip-hop deejays and producers. Original albums have sold for hundreds of dollars. In 2006 a compilation entitled Kashmere Stage Band: Texas Thunder Soul, 1968–1974 was released, featuring both live and studio recordings of the group. 
In early 2008 some thirty alumni of the Kashmere Stage Band gathered for a month of rehearsals to perform two reunion concerts in honor of their “Prof” Johnson and to raise money for the Conrad Johnson Music and Fine Arts Foundation. On February 1, 2008, they played their first reunion concert at Kashmere High School in tribute to Conrad Johnson, who was in attendance. Johnson died two days later. The concerts resulted in the eventual production of a documentary film, Thunder Soul, which premiered in 2010. After the initial reunion concerts in 2008, members of the Kashmere Stage Band subsequently reformed under the leadership of alumna Jimmy Walker as the Kashmere Reunion Stage Band and performed regularly at various High School events. The alumni group also worked regularly with Kashmere High School’s current jazz band……~


That`s a gross exaggeration. We aren�t North Korea. But we do teach our young ones to show up on time, memorize a bit of poetry, some foreign language and maybe some 101 chemistry, and then we dump them on the street. We don`t give them much consumer math, basic sex ed or much else the average American will need. And most of us don`t get lucky enough to get a teacher like Charles O. Johnson. 

A deeply troubled man, Johnson didn`t inflict his personal demons on his students (at least not in a mean way), and could nevertheless serve as a model for a complete revamp of America`s education system. He knew what knowledge he knew and he also knew his limits. He took in weird kids and encouraged them. And he taught them a new avenue of expression and allowed them to fashion their own work (which ranges from straight covers to deeply experimental revisions) largely on their own. Most of what you hear on Texas Thunder Soul: 1968-1974 is the result of Johnson`s rare knack for letting kids be wildly creative kids. 

This collection rocks because it`s the work of troubled children under the oversight of a troubled teacher, working with “funk” as an idiom for the first time, whether putting their own spins on standards or doing something entirely new. It`s the thrill of discovery, and it translates. (Just to be clear, Johnson was never about “soul” or “jazz”, and everything here is hard funk with no apologies.) 

Now you can listen to “Holy Calamity” the way it was before dudes started sampling it. You can watch the DVD, and see Mr. Johnson`s awkwardness in front of big-city crate-diggers like Egon. And you can see that he never gave a fuck about being an influence. He just wanted to teach some young folks a particularly potent avenue of expression. 

Our kids don`t need tax breaks, or vouchers, or cult-connected private schools. We just need more teachers like Mr. Johnson…..by….Emerson Dameron…



KASHMERE STAGE BAND. The Kashmere Stage Band was a very successful high school jazz-funk band that existed from the late 1960s through 1977 in the North Houston area of Kashmere Gardens. The group was founded by Conrad O. Johnson who was the bandleader of Kashmere High School. Conrad “Prof” Johnson was born on November 15, 1915, in Victoria, Texas, and moved with his family to Houston when he was nine. Johnson studied music at Houston College and later at Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, before graduating from there in 1938. Johnson’s teaching career began in 1941, where he taught marching band. He later became a jazz band instructor at Houston’s Booker T. Washington High School, where he remained until moving to Kashmere High School by 1969.
“Prof” Johnson taught the band to blend funk rhythms with big-band jazz in order to create a unique sound especially designed for live performances and competitions. According to former student Joe Carmouche, Johnson worked long hours on evenings and weekends to help his students perfect their sound. He also did the arranging for the musical works, composed some of the pieces himself (including the band’s showcase piece “Kashmere”), and enlisted the ideas of his students. Because he and his students were so committed, the Kashmere Stage Band quickly gained a reputation for high-quality performances, and it dominated local competition and won national championships. Between 1969 and 1978, the Kashmere Stage band won 42 out of 46 contests in which it participated and was voted “Most Outstanding Band in the Nation” at the 1972 All-American Stage Band contest held in Mobile, Alabama.
In 1969 Johnson took the band into the studio to record its first album, Our Thing. According to Johnson, he hoped the album would provide students with a souvenir of the music they had created, and, it would help establish high standards for future students to follow. In all the Kashmere Stage Band recorded eight albums and three 45 rpm records between 1969 and 1978 on Johnson’s own Kram Records label. They toured Europe in 1973. That same year Houston’s mayor designated an official “Kashmere Stage Band Day.” In 1975 the band toured Japan. His students, predominantly African-American teenagers, gained valuable performance experience; while some band members went on to become professional musicians, most made their livelihoods in other careers.
After more than thirty years of teaching jazz in Houston schools, Conrad Johnson retired by 1978. This brought to an end the Kashmere Stage Band although the legacy that he created continued well into the twenty-first century. Kashmere High School became home to the Conrad O. Johnson School of Fine Arts, a Houston ISD magnet school program. Furthermore, the Kashmere Stage Band’s recordings have been in high demand, especially by hip-hop deejays and producers. Original albums have sold for hundreds of dollars. In 2006 a compilation entitled Kashmere Stage Band: Texas Thunder Soul, 1968–1974 was released, featuring both live and studio recordings of the group.
In early 2008 some thirty alumni of the Kashmere Stage Band gathered for a month of rehearsals to perform two reunion concerts in honor of their “Prof” Johnson and to raise money for the Conrad Johnson Music and Fine Arts Foundation. On February 1, 2008, they played their first reunion concert at Kashmere High School in tribute to Conrad Johnson, who was in attendance. Johnson died two days later. The concerts resulted in the eventual production of a documentary film, Thunder Soul, which premiered in 2010. After the initial reunion concerts in 2008, members of the Kashmere Stage Band subsequently reformed under the leadership of alumna Jimmy Walker as the Kashmere Reunion Stage Band and performed regularly at various High School events. The alumni group also worked regularly with Kashmere High School’s current jazz band….by…Chris Lehman….~



Personnel: 

Ricky Adams (saxofone), Arthur Armstrong (saxofone), Johnny Brown (saxofone), Geraldine Calhoun (baixo), Andrei Carriere (guitarra), Paul Chevalier (guitarra), James Cleveland (trombone), Dorothy Compton (percussão), Lionel Cormier (saxofone), Gerald Curvey (bateria), Patricia Davis (vocal), Ronnie Davis (trompete), Michael Dogan (baixo), Timothy Dunham (saxofone), Lawrence Foster (trombone), Samuel Frazier (trompete, tamborim), Grady Gaines (saxofone), Roy Garcia (guitarra), Craig Green (baixo, bateria), Morris ‘Sonny’ Hall (congas), Dwight Harris (trombone), Ray Harris (bateria), James “Ham” Jackson (saxofone), Leo Jackson (trompete), Michael “Mike Dee” Johnson (trompete), Audrey Jones (trompete), Jesse Jones, Jr. (saxofone), Samuel Jones (trombone), Sheila Jordan (vocal), Hilton Joseph (saxofone), Johnny Lewis (bateria), Henry Marks (bateria), Thaddeus McGowen (saxofone), Bruce Middleton (flauta,saxofone), George Miller (vocal, saxofone), Diane Moore (french horn), Harold Morris (saxofone), Cloyce Muckelroy (trompete), Alva Nelson (órgão, piano elétrico).








Conrad O. Johnson Sr. holding a Kashmere Stage Band record.

Conrad O. Johnson Sr. preparing for a Kashmere Stage Band performance





Tracklist 
Studio Recordings 
1.1 Boss City 3:40 
1.2 Burning Spear 3:20 
1.3 Take Five 3:44 
1.4 Super Bad 1:47 
1.5 Keep Doing It 3:04 
1.6 Thunder Soul 3:23 
1.7 Do You Dig It, Man? 3:54 
1.8 Headwiggle 4:18 
1.9 Do Your Thing 5:23 
1.10 Scorpio 4:39 
1.11 Thank You 5:01 
1.12 Al’s Tune 2:54 
1.13 All Praises 6:37 
1.14 Shaft 5:04 
1.15 Kashmere 4:57 
1.16 $$ Kash Register $$ 4:28 
1.17 Zero Point – Pt. 1 & Pt. 2 (45 Version) 5:36 
1.18 Getting It Out Of My System 4:13 
Live Performances & Alternate Takes 
2.1 Intro 1:08 
2.2 Zero Point 0:57 
2.3 All Praises / Zero Point (Reprise) 6:14 
2.4 Intro 0:20 
2.5 Do You Dig It, Man? 3:46 
2.6 Don’t Mean A Thing 5:31 
2.7 Thank You 5:59 
2.8 Ain’t No Sunshine 4:32 
2.9 Do You Dig It, Man? 0:46 
2.10 All Praises 7:03 
2.11 Thank You (45 Version) 4:06 
2.12 Zero Point (LP Version) 4:22 
2.13 Do Your Thing (Instrumental) 4:17 
2.14 Getting It Out Of My System 4:16 
Video Texas Jewels
Includes updated liner notes in a full color 40 page booklet.


Discography 
Texas Thunder Soul 1968–1974 
1972: Zero Point 
1974: Out of Gas But Still Burning 

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