Saturday, 7 July 2018

Tabletom "Mezclalina" 1980 Spain Prog Jazz Rock Fusion Andalusian Rock


Tabletom "Mezclalina" 1980 Spain Prog Jazz Rock Fusion Andalusian Rock
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Such a strange little album, perhaps mirroring the surrealistic cover. On the surface, Tabletom seem to opt for a light, Spanish flavored, jazz rock sound. Flute is the initial featured instrument of choice. Then comes these crunchy power chord guitars, and irregular flamenco style rhythms. Violin and sax also make appearances. The vocalist reminds me of some of the more gravelly Italian guys as found on Jumbo or Odissea. It takes a bit to get into, but this one has a lot to recommend. The last 9 minute track is a barnburner. I had thrown the Mezquita name out in the past, but that's a bit misleading, as Tabletom aren't quite as Andalusian influenced as that may imply. They had a few albums after this debut, but I understand they are of less interest, but don't know for certain. Great Dali-esque cover....by...ashratom....~


Tabletom arose from a hippie-comune in Malaga, Spain around 1976, led by singer Roberto Gonzalez and brothers Jose Ramirez (flute) and Pedro Ramirez (guitar).The original formation included also Jesus Manuel Ortiz on bass/violin, Jose Denis on sax and drummer Paco Oliver, who was later replaced by Salvador Zurita.They debuted in 1980 on RCA with the album ''Mezclalina''. 

By the time they sounded like an Andalusian version of VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR minus the darkened atmospheres and Aussies COMPANY CAINE or LIZARD minus the harder material.They offered five long tracks with dominant use of flutes and saxes, featuring plenty of jazzy underlines in a combination that contained also evident Flamenco-styled rhythms and narcotic, psychedelic instrumentals.Vocals are used only sporadically and the focus relies on extended, instrumental jams with an interesting rhythm section and abnormal soloing by flutes, sax and violin.The music is surprisingly energetic and quite rich despite its mellow atmosphere, coming as a mix of loose executions and well-structured themes in a Psych/Jazz Rock vein, but there are also moments with clear prog tendencies, characterized by more pronounced interplays and dynamic guitar work, not to mention the bulk of changing climates.Gonzalez, who appeared to be one of the band's leaders, had an uneven, raspy voice, which comes as the lowest part of an otherwise cool release.Last track ''La guerra'' contains propably the most balanced sound of the band with extensive, harder guitars battling with flutes and saxes throughout, creating a nice mix of jazzy atmospheres and dense Progressive Rock. 

It appears that the band continued in a more Blues/Jazz Rock style since this release, dissolving in 1985 and returning in early-90's as a trio of Gonzalez and the Ramirez brothers with numerous live shows and many studio albums.Roberto Gonzalez died in 2011 and the Ramirez brothers considered a final break-up, but eventually continued with Tabletom's name, introducing their sister Carmen in the line-up. 

A different side of Spanish Prog, heavily influenced by Jazz, Fusion and Folk.Risky, inventive but not always convincing stuff, which still deserves a better exposure.Recommended....apps79 ......~


Such a strange little album, perhaps mirroring the surrealistic cover. On the surface, Tabletom seem to opt for a light, Spanish flavored, jazz rock sound. Flute is the initial featured instrument of choice. Then comes these crunchy power chord guitars, and irregular flamenco style rhythms. Violin and sax also make appearances. The vocalist reminds of some of the more gravelly Italian guys as found on Jumbo or Odissea. It takes a bit to get into, but this one has a lot to recommend. The last 9 minute track is a barnburner. Tabletom aren't quite as much Andalusian influenced as Mezquita , but in the same style…~


Very fine flute-y Spanish fusionoid prog with occasional funky moves ala Maneige's Libre Sevice or some mid-period Gentle Giant and with a notably suave line in sax swagger that's sometimes filtered in a way reminiscent of Sui Generis and sometimes massed into swooning stately grooves like early Nucleus. Combined with the unexpectedly raw attack of a vocalist who's convinced he's fronting a hard rock band, the resulting clash of musical sophistication and badass rawking is really something to behold and favorably compares with the blazing Argentine Sintesis LP I recently shared....mutant sounds.....~


Such a strange little album, perhaps mirroring the surrealistic cover. On the surface, Tabletom seem to opt for a light, Spanish flavored, jazz rock sound. Flute is the initial featured instrument of choice. Then comes these crunchy power chord guitars, and irregular flamenco style rhythms. Violin and sax also make appearances. The vocalist reminds me of some of the more gravelly Italian guys as found on Jumbo or Odissea. It takes a bit to get into, but this one has a lot to recommend. The last 9 minute track is a barnburner. I had thrown the Mezquita name out in the past, but that's a bit misleading, as Tabletom aren't quite as Andalusian influenced as that may imply. They had a few albums after this debut, but I understand they are of less interest, but don't know for certain. Great Dali-esque cover....Unencumbered Music Reviews....~


Line-up / Musicians 

- Jesús Manuel Ortiz / bass, violin 
- Salvador Zurita / drums 
- Jose Ramírez / flute 
- Pedro Ramírez / guitar 
- José Javier Denis / saxophone 
- Roberto González / vocals




Tracklist 
A1 Tipos Duros (En Memoria De Piyayo) 4:17 
A2 Ininteligible 7:22 
A3 Mezclalina 7:22 
B1 Zero-Zero 9:46 
B2 La Guerra (Contra La Guerra) 8:57 

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