Tuesday, 13 November 2018

Popol Vuh “Hosianna Mantra” 1972 Germany Modern Classical, Ambient,New Age


Popol Vuh “Hosianna Mantra” 1972 Germany Modern Classical, Ambient,New Age
full in google+

One of the most deeply emotionally moving experiences in the history of music. Popol Vuh remains my favorite and the most unique among the experimental German Krautrock scene of the early '70s. Unlike other innovative bands such as Can and Neu!, Popol Vuh played music from the heart rather than the head. They first explored the expression of spirituality in the two side long tracks of electronic music on In den Garten Pharaos (In Pharaoh's Garden) with the revolutionary use of the Moog, as well as African and Turkish percussion. Later they used rock music and the bright, uplifting, affirming sound of Daniel Fischelscher's guitar on Einsjager & Siebenjager (Earth & Sky). Hosianna Mantra, however, remains their profound spiritual masterpiece--a marriage of Eastern and Western sacred music. Florian Fricke converted to both the Western religion of Christianity and the Eastern religion of Hinduism and composed this album as a "mass for the heart". The album was built around organic instrumentation, such as 12-string guitar, piano, oboe, violin, cembalo, tamboura, etc played in a Medieval and Renaissance manner and was recorded in a Buddhist meditative tone with the angelic vocals of Korean soprano Djong Yun. A true delicate treasure. ~ Graveyard Poet.....~


This album has grown as one of the most affecting and memorable recordings I tend to listen. Its spiritual approach accepting all religions as different manifestations of the same search of sanctity fits to my own tolerant quest of acceptance, and the beauty of ambient textures from acoustic-emphasized instruments glorifies the yearning for tranquil ecstasy, carved firmly on the other side of the coin for political misuse of religions trough superstitious masses. 
The sides of the LP form two musical entities, which movement's names are familiar from the Christian lexicon of classical European works, uniting here with global hippie philosophies of meditative musical idioms. "Hosianna - Mantra" starts gentle waves from piano, subtle guitar notes and oriental-toned tambura strings, this setting the scene of cross-cultural viewpoint and spiritual essence of the record clear from the start. Momently cascading piano streams of golden light stir movement to the sacred cycles of this musical prayer, which mostly lingers in the silent corridors of protective monasteries and nature's hideouts from man-created evil. The second movement "Kyrie" is really memorable moment of peace on the record, allowing Conny Veit's delicate guitar weeps and Djong Yun's ethereal singing unite as angelic whispers from tranquil eternity, culmination to ascending melodic progression of salvation. This sequence was also filmed to television, on my understanding as overdub, but however allowing interesting visions from the musicians at their creation environment. Florian Fricke's calm piano lingering reminds the lovely calmness of Bill Evans playing style, yet dissolving to ever more vastness of mental quietude. The main sequence of the three parts spin the mantra of faith residing in the lap of the gods, piano weaving the dynamics for the background movement, giving space for a lovely guitar and oboe solos, vocal adorations and incense-smelling shades from other supporting acoustic instruments. As an artistic creation this work really convinces with the capabilities of reaching sacral resolutions by combining traditional high cultural and modern underground methods. Possibly the purity of aims is more meaningful than the doctrines of expressional instruments. 
The second side of the LP is named based on my understanding by the Deuteronomy of Moses. Even though the commandments of this scripture contain many strict codes, it also by my inferior interpretation deals with monotheistic idea of god's simultaneous existence everywhere. This aspect could be seen from broader objective perspective suiting to the acceptance of global deistic panorama of these charming musicians gathered at 1970's Munich playgrounds. From the movements, "Abschied" follows the paths of a tender hymn lead by oboe and guitar, illuminated by enigmatic tambura chords. Very operatic vision, which melody dramatics flow in vein of 17th century European music. "Segnung" blends to these motives more trance-oriented long vision to the horizon, focusing for both lovely soprano voice and guitar notes on this broad view, decorated by myriad oriental tonal ornaments creating most enlightening musical scenery. On the later parts the melodic themes are studied with broader instrumentation and joyful pace creates more solid form trough the rhythm. Surrounded by meditative sound carpets of "Andacht", "Nicht hoch im Himmel" continues with passive straits resembling classical music emulating third stream jazz, which I got familiar from ECM record's, shimmering this emotion-affecting void. Piano and emphasis on guitar gains strength in the later moments, which give me also associations from holy emptiness of Giya Kancheli's "Exil" work, also released through the prolific German record mentioned. "Ave Maria" concludes the album by summing the album's melodic potential for beautifulness, classical music forms contrasted with table-drums and strengthened with a violin. As a whole both sides create a personal culmination point of sacred art music which I would recommend for anybody as a masterpiece of spiritual music sensation, not being difficult to follow, nor lacking artistic content.....~


Florian Fricke pioneered the use of synthesizers in German rock, but by the time of Hosianna Mantra he had abandoned them (eventually selling his famous Moog to Klaus Schulze). While In den Gärten Pharaos had blended synths with piano and African and Turkish percussion, Hosianna Mantra focuses on organic instrumentation. Conny Veit contributes electric guitar, but other than that, Fricke pulls the plug and builds the album around violin, tamboura, piano, oboe, cembalo, and Veit's 12-string, often with Korean soprano Djong Yun's haunting voice hovering above the arrangements. As the album's title suggests, Fricke conceived of Hosianna Mantra as a musical reconciliation of East and West, a harmonization of seemingly opposed terms, combining two devotional music traditions. That notion of cultural hybridity resonates throughout. On "Kyrie" droning tamboura, simple piano patterns, ethereal, gull-like guitars, and yearning oboe ebb and flow before coalescing in a passage of intensity and release. The epic title track adds another dimension to the fusion, emphasizing a Western rock sound with Veit's spectacular playing to the fore, simultaneously smoldering and liquid, occasionally yielding to Djong Yun's celestial vocals. Above all, Fricke envisioned this as sacred music, intimately linked to religious experience; however, as his musical synthesis of disparate religious traditions indicates, he was seeking to foment a spiritual experience beyond the specificity of any particular faith. Indeed, Fricke called this album a "mass for the heart" and that aspect can be heard most succinctly on the melancholy "Abschied" and the gossamer-fragile "Segnung," which blend an austere hymnal sensibility with a more mystical vibe. Julian Cope has said that Hosianna Mantra sounds like it was made in a "cosmic convalescent home" -- an excellent description underscoring the timeless, healing quality of this music, which is far removed from the everyday world and yet at one with it.....by Wilson Neate....~


This ethereal album is a beautiful step in the history of music. Composer keyboardist Florian Fricke works with talented guitarists, an opera singer and small group musicians to synthesize sacred music traditions of Europe and Asia. Like all great syntheses, the music is clear, apparently effortless, patterned and relishes its entwined hymnal and mantra qualities. What a trip, fresh as when it was lovingly performed and recorded in 1972.....by....Fade Up....~


Originally released in 1972, this being one of Popol Vuh's earlier efforts. Main reason I decided to check out this experimental / krautrock title was that - recently, I happened to purchase the Kawabata Makoto CD by the same name that was the Acid Mothers Temple's main player's personal tribute to Popol Vuh. Tracks that I got the most out of were "Kyrie", the ten-minute inspiring title cut "Hosianna Mantra", the truly innovative "Segnung" and the spine-tingling "Nicht Hoch Im Himmel" (just beautiful!). Personnel: Florian Fricke - cembalo, piano & percussion, Robert Eliscu (Between) - oboe, Fritz Sonnleitner - violin, Connie Veit (Gila) - guitars, Djong Yun - sax & vocals and Klaus Weiss - percussion & tamboura. Keep in mind that I've never been that huge of a Popol Vuh fan - but this work is truly ahead of it's time in every aspect. I like a lot of the other krautrock bands, both past and current. 'Hosianna Mantra' is a must-have....Mike Reed ....~


If you already know Popol Vuh, but not this album, rest assured that this will be your favorite Popol Vuh album. If you're not familiar with the band (Florian Fricke, really), know that this is the most beautiful album you'll ever own. Simply, Hosianna Mantra is the most beautiful album ever recorded. Guitars, violin, piano, oboe, and Korean singer Djong Yun combine to out-pretty all that came before. But it's not schmaltzy. It's just beautiful. Jazzy just enough not to be annoying, psychadelic just enough not to be exasperating, it's just the sweetest sound you've ever heard. Now, if you're a Popol Vuh fan who never heard this, just know it is better than everything else. It is Popol Vuh at its best. Buy this thing. Nothing is "better".....Jim Keil.....~


Among the many German musicians who in the 1970s "traveled" (in person or just spiritually) to India and the Far East and absorbed Eastern spirituality in the format of western music, Florian Fricke is likely to be the greatest. His work has been a constant exploration of the same theme: how to express the most personal, profound, austere spirituality by the means of western classical music, western sacred music and profane rock music. It was a marriage of East and West, and a marriage of past and present, made on Earth. In fact, it was made in Germany, and it bears the stigmata of German history. Almost inevitably, Fricke ended up denying the fundamental tenet of German music of his age: electronics. The humble, peaceful tones of acoustic instruments served his purpose better than the majestic complexity of synthesizers and sequencers. 

In 1972 Fricke converted to both Christianity and Hinduism, and decided to move even further away from electronic instruments, preferring the most humble acoustic instruments over high-tech devices. A new line-up, centered around the angelic wails of Korean soprano Djong Yun, recorded Hosianna Mantra (Pilz, january 1973) in a Buddhist meditative tone, showing a solemn and elegant way to bridge the Western mass and Eastern meditation. Fricke on keyboards, Amon Duul II's guitarist Conny Veit, Between's Robert Eliscu on oboe, Fritz Sonnleitner on violino, Klaus Wiese on tambouras build up ascetic atmospheres that catapult the listener into Tibetan or Gregorian monasteries. Most of the interplay is between the piano (tenderly caressed by Fricke) and the guitar (whose phrasing simulates the Indian mantras). The other instruments add evocative power to the music, rarely altering the flow, in a manner similar to renaissance music. The key difference between this music and classical or rock music is the repudiation of rhythm: Tangerine Dream was removing rhythm (i.e., Time) from its cosmic soundpainting, and Popol Vuh removed rhythm (i.e., Time) from its spiritual soundpainting....by....Oliver....~


Hosianna Mantra is truly something special compared to the remainder of Popol Vuh's catalogue (at least from what I've heard of it so far). The band stripped back the electronic ambient of In den Gärten Pharaos to reveal a minimalist, expansive soundscape, beautifully punctuated by eastern and western classical instrumentation and the enchanting vocals of Dyong Yun. The heavy use of piano and harpsichord, as well as the "sprititual" vocals and "droning" production, (I could have sworn that the band used an organ although it is not mentioned on any of the credits I have seen) evokes a very strong ecclesiastical atmosphere. Paradoxically, some of this droning quality is contributed by the use of the tambura, an Indian instrument similar to a sitar, and, ultimately, the album does an amazing job at marrying western and eastern sounds to create something unique. Seligpreisung would continue the band's ecclesiastical sound, although it would be slightly inferior (only slightly though!) with its less ambitious approach and the absence of the Dyong Yun's vocals. 

The ecclesiastical themes are suggested by the track titles. Each side of the album is given subtitle: 'Hosianna Mantra' for the first side and 'Das V. Buch Mose' ("The 5th Book of Moses") for the second. With the continuous flow of the tracks, each side may be considered as a larger track or suite and this is how it is represented on some track listings. In a way, all of the tracks follow a similar pattern with dominant piano supported by heavily produced, but understated, violin, tambura and oboe, creating an unobtrusive "wall of sound" backdrop. 

The first side consists of 'Ah!', 'Kyrie' and the title track. 'Ah!' is a pleasant introductory track without vocals. It's main defining feature are the (relatively) manic flurry of piano scales, giving a sense of urgency within the otherwise peaceful music. To me it gives an impression of a waterfall in amongst otherwise serene countryside. 'Kyrie' is an otherworldly gospel track, the first with Dyong Yun's angelic vocals, ably supported by the drawn out production simulating the thick atmosphere of an organ. There's even room for a strange little guitar solo, which doesn't quite add to the track, but certainly doesn't hinder it for me. The title track is similar to 'Kyrie', mixed with a bit of Cluster-style ambient and Manuel Göttsching-style guitar noodling. It's a little bit long and wayward, especially the lengthy guitar noodlings, but again Dyong Yun's vocals practically make the track. 

The second side 'Das V. Buch Mose' starts off with 'Abschied' ("Goodbye"). The production on this track again is exquisite, with what sounds to be a beautiful mellotron backing but, with this instrument also not appearing in the credits, I have to assume it is a heavily produced violin with tambura backing. With 'Segnung' ("Blessing") I'll just have to say "more of the same" as it's pretty similar to 'Kyrie' and 'Abshied'. On the other hand 'Nicht hoch im Himmel' ("Not High in the Sky") provides a touch of darkness not really present in the remainder of the album. Even the vocals this time are a bit more bleak rather than the melancholic, but hopeful, vocals heard elsewhere. 

Confusingly, there are two tracks titled 'Andacht' ("Devotion") which are merely short shimmerings of tambura and guitar. These could easily have been considered as the intro and coda of 'Nicht hoch im Himmel' rather than separate tracks. Together with the darker sound of 'Nicht hoch im Himmel', the album seems to finish suddenly and in an ambiguously unresolved fashion. It has never really bothered me though as, while you can pick at little weaknesses here and there throughout the album, on the whole it is essentially beautiful from start to finish....by....Bitterman ....~


The words "new age" are enough to strike fear in the heart of many. The genre name strikes up thoughts of nineties yoga videos and overpriced candles. But in the pre-digital world, those seeds had not yet been sown. The cliches and trappings that were to consume this once-innocent genre had not yet come to form, with Hosianna Mantra as a wonderful example of the genre before it had been tainted by cynical opportunists looking for a quick buck. 

Popol Vuh had its roots in the German Krautrock scene of the early 1970s. Although the term "Krautrock" is now most associated with the motorik work of bands such as Can and Neu, it was a pretty diverse scene, spanning from psychedelic jam rock to proto-ambient. Popol Vuh was in the latter category, although they weren't electronic based like many of their followers. Hosianna Mantra, their third album, sees them move into a more classical-influenced direction. It's a very timeless piece. It doesn't operate within the standards of the time, or for that matter, the past or future. It combines western and eastern classical musics into a blend that remains unique and classy. Beautiful. Just beautiful....by....Quadricycle ....~


A truly exceptional album in Popol Vuh's discography, not least because of the ethereal, haunting vocal contributions by Djong Yun, creating a sound that was at least a decade ahead of its time - I actually find the combination of ghostly female vocals and shimmering, delicate musical performances reminiscent of some of the work produced by Dead Can Dance or the Cocteau Twins in the 1980s. Whilst many other of the leading lights in the Krautrock genre were exploring synthesiser-dominated ambient drone works, Florian Fricke and his guest musicians apply a greater instrumental variety and let loose some exceptional performances, Conny Veit's guitar work being particularly noteworthy. A jewel in Popol Vuh's crown....by....Warthur ....~


The contrast is radical to say the least. Until then, the moog and the synthesizer were the hallmark of Popol Vuh. These electronic sounds thus generated defined the base from which Florian Fricke could indulge in his mystical ramblings. They do not leave it however, just like this "Ah!" who opens the album, Popol Vuh now trades his costume for a purely acoustic dressing. Piano, harpsichord, violin and clarinet depict an atmosphere that also invites introspection. This is the way to lead us, but it is surprising. She is laying the groundwork for what Popol Vuh will be able to offer us in her second half of her career. Fricke thus begins a new cycle to aesthetics in a certain more symphonic sense, nourished bucolic and rural qualities that could be found in a lot of English or Italian groups of the progressive scene of the time. Nevertheless, Popol Vuh remains honest and faithful to his line of conduct. At least, so far. Although his new band is now composed of eminent musicians, among whom we find Gila's guitarist, Conny Veit, the music of Popol Vuh remains delicate and precious, enchanting and magical. Silence imposes its evocative force throughout the album. So much subtlety and parsimony in the arrangements surprise at a time when overbidding and excess predominate. "Hosianna Mantra" is heard as one contemplates a pointillist work; according to the angle of view, one s' alternately focus on the fineness of the details or on an overview that then makes sense. Finally closer to a progressive folk that would be inspired by both the rigor of Erik Satie and the religiosity of Olivier Messiaen, "Hosianna Mantra" marks an important turning point in the career of the German group....by...Hellman ....~


The Popol Vuh is a text of great antiquity, narrating the mythistorical religion of the K’iche’ people, a Mayan tribe native to Guatamala. It is also the title of one of the greatest musical groups to have come out of the German krautrock scene. The 70’s were a period of unprecedented sociopolitical and spiritual change as the counterculture movement took hold. Anarchist communes sprung into existence across Europe, wherein small communities of young adults would experiment with art, music, drugs and spirtuality. The wonders of Far Eastern mysticism became a point of interest for these artists, leading them to divulge in ancient religious texts to redefine their narrowed perspective at the hands of a typically conservative mid 20th century. 
Hosianna Mantra was the third studio album by Popol Vuh, a band undoubtedly born out of this enlightenment of the artistic underground alongside other flagship krautrock commune band, Amon Düül I and II. Founded by the keyboard virtuoso, Florian Fricke, Popol Vuh initially began as a proto-ambient, electronic project; the first to employ the use of Moog synthesizers in Germany. This was short lived however. By the release of Hosianna Mantra, Fricke had returned to acoustic instruments and a decisively ethnic musical style that spanned the extent of human civillisation and culture. The instrumentation featured on this record is diverse and beautiful. Indian tamburas drone beneath articulate electric guitars that almost mimic human speech and song. Delicate and flamboyant pianos are wound tightly around clarion oboes and a gorgeous female vocal performance. Percussion is delightfully absent, giving this release the blissed-out, psychedelic atmospherics ideal for whiling away those midnight hours, joint in hand. 
The religious theme of this album is self-evident. The cover features a painting of a woman in a style evocative of renaissance depictions of a certain venerated virgin. The title too takes ‘hosianna’ from Christian practises, and ‘mantra’ from those of Hinduism, melding them together as one. Fricke explained his reasoning behind this as a belief that, ‘basically all religions are the same. You always find it in your own heart. And the music of Hosianna Mantra is really touching your heart. It is made to touch your heart. That is why you can call it a Mass. A Mass for your own heart.’ The esoteric atmospheres Fricke and his bandmates employ gives the album a ritualistic feeling, and by the end of a session with this release I dare you not to feel purged, cleansed and at peace......~


2015 Restock. With its religious theme it shouldn't be heretic to consider Hosianna Mantra as a small miracle. Suddenly the dark, unmelodic Popol Vuh offer us an incredibly beautiful work of amazing gothic folk that, this time, fit perfectly in the Pilz catalogue - yet managing to sound as something completely unique. It was originally released in 1972 and featured a host of musicians that included Conny Veit on guitars, Robert Eliscu on oboe, Djong Yun on vocals and Klaus Wiesse on tamboura, led of course by Florian Fricke who played piano and cembalo.The Wah Wah edition features a bonus 7" w/PS that reproduces the original, rare 45 by Korean soprano Djong Yun featuring "Du Sollst Lieben" and "Ave Maria", written by Bettina Fricke and backed by Popol Vuh. Reissued from the master tapes in quality vinyl pressing, full glory laminated gatefold cover and featuring the bonus 7" plus a poster and an insert with liners and photos. Her only solo output known is this obscure single, which we've not encountered an original of in over 20 years (the Freeman brothers' Crack in the Cosmic Egg...~


"In 1972 Fricke converted to both Christianity and Hinduism, and decided to move even further away from electronic instruments, preferring the most humble acoustic instruments over high-tech devices. A new line-up, centered around the angelic wails of Korean soprano Djong Yun, recorded Hosianna Mantra (Pilz, january 1973) in a Buddhist meditative tone, showing a solemn and elegant way to bridge the Western mass and Eastern meditation. Fricke on keyboards, Amon Duul II's guitarist Conny Veit, Between's Robert Eliscu on oboe, Fritz Sonnleitner on violino, Klaus Wiese on tambouras build up ascetic atmospheres that catapult the listener into Tibetan or Gregorian monasteries. Most of the interplay is between the piano (tenderly caressed by Fricke) and the guitar (whose phrasing simulates the Indian mantras). The other instruments add evocative power to the music, rarely altering the flow, in a manner similar to renaissance music. The key difference between this music and classical or rock music is the repudiation of rhythm: Tangerine Dream was removing rhythm (i.e., Time) from its cosmic soundpainting, and Popol Vuh removed rhythm (i.e., Time) from its spiritual soundpainting."....~


At the beginning of the 1970s Florian Fricke underwent a spiritual transformation, which greatly influenced the nature of the music he played. The effects were already heard on the second album of his group Popol Vuh, "In den Gärten Pharaos" - probably the most spiritual of all kraut rock releases. Shortly after its release, Fricke came to the conclusion that the synthesizers did not match the music so strongly referring to religion. So he decided to sell his Moog (he was bought by another musician closely related to Krautrock scene, Klaus Schulze) and replaced him with acoustic instruments - piano and harpsichord. He also completely changed the band - new guitarists were Conny Veit (also known from krail rock groups Gila, Guru Guru and Amon Duul II), oboist Robert Eliscu (from the folk-kraut rock song Between), 

The above musicians (supported by the violinist Fritz Sonnleitner) recorded the material for the album "Hosianna Mantra". The title says a lot about its content. The songs on the one hand refer to the European serious sacred music, and on the other - to the traditional music of the Middle East. Exactly - Popol Vuh on this album does not play krautrock, or any other kind of rock music (although her fans will certainly appreciate Veita guitar solos). Actually, the problematic issue is the qualified content of "Hosianna Mantra" for any kind of music. Some call it acoustic ambientothers classify to a classical crossover, and still others are looking for the beginnings of world music and new age. Fricke, an independent composer of the whole, undoubtedly created an original style, combining - as it seemed - completely incompatible elements. It is difficult, or perhaps completely impossible, to point to anything similar. 

However, the album delights not only with its originality and, above all, its incredible beauty. It is filled with very subtle and spiritual music, full of religious mysticism. The classicising parties of piano, oboe, harpsichord and soprano Djong Yun (singing biblical texts based on the work of philosopher Martin Buber), and sometimes violin appearing, create a mood similar to sacred music, while drone parts of tambourine add a meditative character , typical for Hindustan music. The whole party is perfectly blended with the parts of Conny Veit's electric guitar, which no group of classic progressive rock would be ashamed of. Describing individual songs does not make much sense because they create a very coherent, homogeneous, but not monotonous whole. 

Popol Vuh is one of the really few bands who, after all, have rock roots that have been able to skilfully draw from classical music, not rubbing against kitsch, ridicule or pathos, nor trivializing it. "Hosianna Mantra" is the best example.......~


With its religious theme it shouldn't be heretic to consider Hosianna Mantra as a small miracle. Suddenly the dark, unmelodic Popol Vuh offer us an incredibly beautiful work of amazing gothic folk that, this time, fit perfectly in the Pilz catalogue - yet managing to sound as something completely unique. It was originally released in 1972 and featured a host of musicians that included Conny Veit on guitars, Robert Eliscu on oboe, Djong Yun on vocals and Klaus Wiesse on tamboura, led of course by Florian Fricke who played piano and cembalo. 

The Wah Wah edition features a bonus 7" w/PS that reproduces the original, rare 45 by Korean soprano Djong Yun featuring "Du Sollst Lieben" and "Ave Maria", written by Bettina Fricke and backed by Popol Vuh. 

Reissued from the master tapes in quality vinyl pressing, full glory laminated gatefold cover and featuring the bonus 7" plus an insert with liners and photos. Liner notes by Popol Vuh expert Dolf Mulder....~ 


Christian philosophy and Hindu philosophy fused with a celestial dialectic purity. The sound expands until it becomes immaterial. Love becomes Music and becomes a Mass for the heart. A unicum that gives quietness and that anticipates the birth of the New Age, in the most noble sense of the term. 
All this is Hosianna Mantra , pure avant-garde with a fragile melodious cartilage, where cultured acoustics marry transcendence to become an immutable miracle. 
Affirming the unity and the eternity of the spirit, Fricke and his companions did not deny the idea of ​​progress, rather they accentuated it, but changing direction with respect to the electronic trajectories of their previous album ( In Den Garten Pharaos) and of all contemporary space-kraut, concentrating all its research on the idea of ​​purity. But since that aspiration to transcendence did not have a term even in God, Fricke's inspiration did not descend from above, emanating from life and experience, from mutual transcendence and from the final sublimation of the senses (" métamorphose mistique de tous mes sens fondus en un ", said Baudelaire), and it was precisely this continuous spiritual movement that allowed us to grasp reality no longer certain and visible, but the rhythm of a secret, mysterious transmutation: an interpretation of the appearance of music and of religious significance as symbolic of universal harmony , where even the antipodes and opposites no longer contrast but become one. A whole far-fetched and dazzling, linear and disturbing, but so beautiful as to seem perfect. Where even jazz manages to live with minimalism, rock with religion, material with the immaterial, Christianity with Hinduism, and the academy becomes a field of experimentation. 
On the vaporous, indistinct surfaces, the color notes took on timbres and sound vibrations: the flowers could seem like butterflies, the figures could be strange flowers. With the colors of the notes, in fact, Fricke did not want to make only visual sensations, but sounds and fragrances, in the same way as in poetry he made Rimbaud , with his vowel color. And that's how violins and harpsichords, piano and oboe, joined the unforgettable cobwebs of Đồng Yun and his ecstatic singing (a sort of Elizabeth Fraser in the embryonic phase): angelic soprano that together with Fricke's architectures allowed the sound of hover and spin in immortality. 
A masterpiece that expressed the cult for ancient design, but did not stop at the surface or the appearance of things, penetrated beyond, investigating their secret structure, the mystery of life, to touch God. ....by WES XIV .....~


Call it 'metaphysical rock'. Call it 'religious rock'. Call it what you want. We would like to call it the Opera d'Arte. The Popol Vuh, a creature of Florian Fricke, take their first steps in Germany in the late 60s, already a spectator of the spread of a particular form of prog-rock: the kraut-rock, increasingly tended to look for the result in electronics of its evolution. Fully integrated into the "Affenstunde" album, Florian Fricke, a classical music scholar and a fervent acquaintance of oriental culture (in particular Tibet), broke away from the 'umbilical cord', looking for new answers from the music. The premise is "In den Gärten Pharaos" of '71, but the peak is reached with "Hosianna Mantra". You put electronic instruments as if they were already old clothes (albeit so modern), Fricke creates a work that is as fascinating as it is revolutionary. Guitars, sitar and other classical instruments - piano, strings, oboe and harpsichord - alternate and merge their notes into one magical whole; to assist the melodies the ethereal voice of the soprano Djong Yun, struggling with steps taken from the Bible. Conceived as if it were a mass, "Hosianna Mantra" (hosianna = Christian tradition / mantra = Indian tradition) aims to become the perfect soundtrack of the soul (not by chance Fricke was a friend and collaborator of the director Herzog): remarkable affinities with that masterpiece signed by Ennio Morricone which is the OST of "Mission". An inalienable journey between spirituality, psychedelic, folklore (Teutonic and Indian), avant-garde, new age, "Hosianna Mantra" is refinement and fluctuation, purity and reconciliation, delicacy and evasion. An album totally out of every genre / pattern, but that sounds for all of its 40 minutes, so familiar, so effective, so close. "Hosianna Mantra" is the desperate escape from reality, the most mystical distraction from the modern world. A monument in notes.....by....Giacomo Corradi....~


This is the story of a love at first sight, one of those destined to last over time, and it's a story that starts from afar. Probably from that imprecise day of 1966, when with the little change that mom gave me I bought my first non-Italian 45 laps: Rolling Stones' Paint It Black, which joined the pile of the other Italian beat disks: the Ravens, the Rokes, the Equipe 84, the beloved Caterina Caselli and shortly after the Yeeeeeh tornado of the Primitives. But more than any other I liked to dance that Paint It Black the summer evenings in the courtyard below, along with other guys all older than me. I was a bit like the mascot and as they were saying in the village that I was rather good at shake in the shake, the dance in vogue of the period, they took me as if I were one of them. I lived in a mountain village at the foot of the Dolomites, in that Bettola di Zorzoi di Sovramonte road that continued along the road led straight through a path closer and closer to that mysterious Castel di Schenèr (just the one told by Matteo Melchiorre in our book of the month December 2016), the border between two micro worlds, that of Feltrino and that of Primiero. In that context of the remote province of the north, in other ways rather harsh, there were often happy and carefree moments. Paint It Black was one of these for me, it struck me that hypnotic sound, that repetitive riff that already looked to the east, even if I did not know what a sitar or the tablas or a dulcimer were (instruments that Brian Jones played at the time ) I just liked getting carried on that flying carpet that seemed so strange and exotic. Time ran faster than thought, and in a couple of years I found myself for other mysterious routes catapulted into that of Brescia, where I lived for the five years of high school, returning to the country only for summer holidays and holidays commanded. In college, I became acquainted with other boys from the city who were far more enraptured than me, who introduced me in less than no time to the imaginative world of "prog". Goodbye naive beat, it was time to plunge headlong into Genesis, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, EL & P, Van Der Graaf, our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened . Time ran faster than thought, and in a couple of years I found myself for other mysterious routes catapulted into that of Brescia, where I lived for the five years of high school, returning to the country only for summer holidays and holidays commanded. In college, I became acquainted with other boys from the city who were far more enraptured than me, who introduced me in less than no time to the imaginative world of "prog". Goodbye naive beat, it was time to plunge headlong into Genesis, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, EL & P, Van Der Graaf, our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened .. Time ran faster than thought, and in a couple of years I found myself for other mysterious routes catapulted into that of Brescia, where I lived for the five years of high school, returning to the country only for summer holidays and holidays commanded. In college, I became acquainted with other boys from the city who were far more enraptured than me, who introduced me in less than no time to the imaginative world of "prog". Goodbye naive beat, it was time to plunge headlong into Genesis, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, EL & P, Van Der Graaf, our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened .returning to the country only for summer holidays and controlled holidays. In college, I became acquainted with other boys from the city who were far more enraptured than me, who introduced me in less than no time to the imaginative world of "prog". Goodbye naive beat, it was time to plunge headlong into Genesis, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, EL & P, Van Der Graaf, our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened . returning to the country only for summer holidays and controlled holidays. In college, I became acquainted with other boys from the city who were far more enraptured than me, who introduced me in less than no time to the imaginative world of "prog". Goodbye naive beat, it was time to plunge headlong into Genesis, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, EL & P, Van Der Graaf, our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened .our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened .our Le Orme and PFM and then all the others you can imagine. Until another unspecified day of the year 1972 (at least I remember it) the miracle happened ....by Gino Dal Soler......~ 





















Tracklist 
Ah! 4:43 
Kyrie 5:20 
Hosianna - Mantra 10:15 
Das 5. Buch Mose
Abschied 3:10 
Segnung 6:00 
Andacht 0:40 
Nicht Hoch Im Himmel 6:17 
Andacht 0:35 


Credits 

Electric Guitar, Twelve-String Guitar – Conny Veit 
Oboe – Robert Eliscu 
Piano, Harpsichord – Popol Vuh 
Soprano Vocals – Djong Yun 
Tambura – Klaus Wiese 
Violin – Fritz Sonnleitner



Discography 


Affenstunde (1970) 
In den Gärten Pharaos (1971) 
Hosianna Mantra (1972) 
Seligpreisung (1973) 
Einsjäger und Siebenjäger (1974) 
Das Hohelied Salomos (1975) 
Aguirre (1975) 
Letzte Tage – Letzte Nächte (1976) 
Herz aus Glas (1977) 
Brüder des Schattens – Söhne des Lichts (1978) 
Nosferatu (1978) 
Die Nacht der Seele (1979) 
Sei still, wisse ICH BIN (1981) 
Agape – Agape (1983) 
Spirit of Peace (1985) 
Cobra Verde (1987) 
For You and Me (1991) 
Sing, for Song Drives Away the Wolves (1993) 
City Raga (1995) 
Shepherd's Symphony – Hirtensymphonie (1997) 
Messa di Orfeo (1999) 

Florian Fricke solo albums 

Die Erde und ich sind Eins (1983) – limited private pressing 
Florian Fricke Plays Mozart (1992) – featuring Fricke on piano playing Mozart compositions 









watch
Popol Vuh  "Das Hohelied Salomos” 1975 Germany Prog Kraut Rock Electronic






johnkatsmc5,the experience of music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

Dance

Dance

Crazy with music

Crazy with music

RCA Victor - Living Stereo 1958

RCA Victor - Living Stereo 1958

I Love Rock n` Roll

I Love Rock n` Roll

Music

Music

Plays vinyl

Plays vinyl

vinyl

vinyl