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Sunday, 24 February 2019

Chico Magnetic Band "Chico Magnetic Band 1971 France Acid Psych Funk Rock (Best 100 European Grooves Groove Collector)


Chico Magnetic Band "Chico Magnetic Band 1971 France Acid Psych Funk Rock (Best 100 European Grooves Groove Collector)

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Obscure & cult LP produced by the famous arranger Jean Pierre Massiera ( disques SEM ) with psych band "Chico Magnetic” from Lyon (FR). The result is crazy !!! with dark feel, psych rock, funky grooves breaks and dub effects. Also Hendrix vein solos….~


Even though this absolutely brilliant and overwhelming album is but a half an hour in length, it is so chock full o’ balls and amazing riffs that consistently make all the right moves at the right times it’s downright scary and seems twice the length due to its raging density of vision. Given that (and that fact it seems almost entirely culled from moments of only the top tier fab waxings in my collection) it also seems far longer than THAT because everything on it counts SO BAD it lights a fire in my head, creates a fevered dickswell and comes close to bursting my heart every time I spin it. 

Why? Put simply, this freakin’ album has EVERYTHING. And by that I mean it draws from elements of approaches set down by “Phallus Dei”-era Amon Düül Zwei, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Silberbart, Straight-era Alice Cooper, Can, Guru Guru, Groundhogs, Speed Glue & Shinki, Led Zeppelin, Captain Beefheart & The Magic Band, Tiger B. Smith and “Free Your Mind”-period Funkadelic (so help me Eddie) and are seamlessly wedged into one album. 

Chico IS…The Man. And he is immersed in an ocean of non-verbal language ranging from expressions of spittle-speak to larynx yank projected over a cranked up to fuck-off level trio projecting unbridled heaviosity heaved onto an LP with all the intimacy of a band that lives, breathes, farts, cries, bleeds, sweats, shits, pisses, vomits, cums, eats, buys pot and gets high together. And as if by some process of psychotropic osmosis all are locked into the same psychic force field that alternatively is searching in the wilderness, crying to the sky, crawling just beyond Damascus with their flies and minds undone and their heads on fire with all their passion directed into a funneled pummel that is undying energy the same way life itself is. And its raging power and whirlwind qualities are caught as they claw at the double iron gates of reality to get buzzed into the realm of the beyond with their stinky package of love special delivery, looking for the big old rock’n’roll godhead to sign for it and they wind up shoving it under his nose and promptly fucking off to parts unknown forever after the bittiest output of one album and 3 singles for three separate labels (whose chronology can be traced by the growing obscurity of the companies: one single for CBS called “Pop Or Not”/“Inverse Pop;” Disques Vogue’s issue of two album tracks as “My Sorrow”/“We All Come And Go” and “Girls Of Ocean”/“Phantasm” for Tuba Records.) 

Formed in Lyon in 1969 as Chico & The Slow Death because they meant it (man), the following year they renamed themselves Chico Magnetic Band and comprised Chico on death throttle vocals; Patrick Garel on pounding dunderhead drums; Alain Mazet on Richter scale raising bass and Bernard Monneri on howlingly fierce shred guitar with attached fuzz/wah hardwired directly into his frontal lobes. And what this crew laid down was a freewheeling and loose mess that created its own language, cycling as it does through a back catalogue of the collective id, the rejected odd and the accepted stinky: as though every emotion every uttered for generations and every symbolic thrust of the battering ram against the gates of nothingness have touched down all on one album with an overdose of ESP. 

Released on the tiny Disques Vogue subsidiary label Box Office, “Chico Magnetic Band” was recorded at two different Parisian studios: Europa Sonor (where Magma recorded their first album and Aphrodite’s Child laid down their classic “666” double album) and Wagram Studios. And judging the results of those last two named records, Europa Sonor had some uniquely sounding rooms on their premises, which carried over with the widest sonic spectrum onto “Chico Magnetic Band.” Producer Jean-Pierre Rawson boisterously captured the group’s thunder live in the studio as clear as an unmuddied lake while also resounding with an unstoppable fury. These sounds are everything I search for in rock’n’roll. It’s tripped out. It’s psychedelic. It’s heavy. It’s very heavy. It roots me to the ground AND it’s got experimental electronic freak outs as well as moments of chilling acoustic introspection that can only portend heavy shit raining down and they never made an umbrella THIS strong to withstand such a torrent. It’s heavy to the soul as well as to the ears, and its not only as bold as love but it’s bolder than fuck and although it only lasts for a half an hour look out because there’s a fire in the hole cause Chico and The Magnetic hommes are not only coming through, but coming through in the biggest way possible. 

“Explosion” begins the album not with a whimper nor even a bang but Chico’s entire reason for existence all laid out in one glorious collision after another with Chico yammering, barking, guffawing and channeling consonants in a way irrespective of enunciation and rarely with a literal clue as to what he is freaking out so badly over as his ever-heaving, pulsating soul forces out a welter of incomprehensible sounds in such a riveting and demonstrative manner they almost make even Damo Suzuki’s English/Japanese/neither dreamtime-to-Samurai-rage vocals seem like the Queen’s English by comparison. Sometimes Chico isn’t singing so much as speaking, whispering or just freaking out at the open air around him as the Magnetic Band furry-freak to it all in total free-rock heaviness. The middle section is somewhat related to Deep Purple’s instrumental break in “Mandrake Root” but minus the Hammond plus a full-on percussion section and it’s a million times crazier as Chico goes gaga – at one point whispering then choking out wave after wave of larynx attack in a spittle-spraying frenzy. The percussion line of franticness hangs so long and hollowly behind Chico’s half-spoken, half-muttered, half-laughed and near incomprehensible pronouncements that only point to certain meanings that are instinctively grasped but cannot be explained, only felt. He’s dropping consonants and vowels left, right and centre and I can only make out “My sweat tastes like a river!” until it’s directed into a 4-lane highway of vocal gibber along the lines of: “Nuuuaaarrgugug!,” “Nene waundah orf zarebbb!” and even “Anmyne cloth iss fallin dawn!!” And the guitar playing is exemplary. The fuzz and wah-wah is used only to shattering degrees for maximum effect and often. Then Chico’s hairy freak-speak re-enters, translating everything into a random free-form gear stripping speech that abides to no known patterns of human language as behind him the band pump out and wrestle up storm up with each perfectly timed drum fill, each burnt fuzz-o-delic guitar lick accented to perfection and those low grunting Tiger B. Smith vocals getting it all on at once is just crazy…especially for this long. Somehow, the piece finally ends with a deluxe CLANG!-HONK!-TWEET! And you don’t really know if it all really happened out loud or what. 

Is it heavy? 
Yes. 
Are they French? 
WEEE. 

The entire album could just be this first track, and it would STILL be a killer. 
Ooh-la-fucking-la. 

The instrumental “Pop Pull Hair” sees the entry of electronic technical effects let loose by the French experimentalist Jean-Pierre Massiera and it is far spacier and heavier than the collages he assembled on his previous Les Maledictus Sound LP. The entire track runs backwards with UFO landings while creeping, sucking sounds and an aural casting of long shadows getting longer that threaten to absorb the mental landscape with successive, ominous strides. The quiet entry of “Lot Of Things” and a descending bass begins watchfully like “Sleeping Village” and/or “Brain Brain” by Silberbart with overall “Careful With That Axe” eugenics as cymbals tap in the darkness. This quickly rises into a shattering display of lurching, blazing guitar accompanied with deeper toned Hendrixian quiver-speak as Chico’s words only SOUND as if they’re run backwards as they dribble out from his mouth like blood. Another tempest hammers out by the band at top volume, and then falls away to another simmering comedown. But when THAT guitar solo ensues so unbelievably heavy, before you fully recover from it it’s already onto riffing off the “Beck’s Bolero” section of “How Many More Times” with the band in tow and Chico probably flailing on the studio floor and speaking of which: HOW many more times can this record continue to outdo itself?!! Chico then starts freaking in the echoed darkness with pronouncements like Don Van Vliet and Damo Suzuki in a self-strangulation contest ala Vliet’s palsied “Neon Meate Dream of An Octafish” tongue flapping drool-o-thon, “Tra la, tra la, tra la, tra la…tra LA” choking and sputtering well into the fadeout. With strident, thundering drums “We All Come And Go” cracks open and all is blistering Rock once more and nothing else. The middle section sees Chico’s hastily rushed out vocals crazily falling out into a pile of letters that only assemble in time against a distinctly Biergarten schlager for swingin’ steins-accented melody as he (nearly) sings the title “We all come and go…” Swiftly, the band is already locked in together and promptly off across the instrumental section highlighted by a stunningly blistering guitar solo as Patrick Garel’s double time drumming swings between the legs while simultaneously nailing down every virgin space in sight and the whole band is giving each other so much damn space to blast off that they never miss a beat with all those quick, vertiginous stops and starts. 

Side two is just as excellent. “To Where I Belong” opens with a brief electronic swizzle into hyperspace that parts to reveal Chico plus his ever-Magnetic Band playing bongos with cross-stitched acoustic guitars like 1970-period Can jamming in the back garden of Schloss Norvenich. Returning electronic tones whoosh by and vacuum the whole mess up and replace it with cyclical riffs peeled offa Amon Düül Zwei’s creeping, nightmarish “Dem Guten, Schönen, Wahren” as acoustic and electric guitars pull together to construct an epic mystery dance. Then it’s a brutal shift into the furious paces of the electric intro/break-out of Zep’s “Bring It On Home” which they continue to hammer on home all and drape it with downer wah-wah action to make it all the more explosive. Then a surprise return directly back to the Düül death dance which then rears its screeching head back to the previous fury. Somehow, it’s left a stoned trail of mental breadcrumbs and finds itself back to the earlier acoustic passage and a final fade. Things slow down with the ooze away funk of “My Sorrow” all furrowed by Chico’s backward-masked-but-not-really drawl vocal that drags through the primeval soup of creation over clattering percussion accented by searing wah-wah and adorned with a fantastically screeching run-on sentence of a wah-wah’ed guitar solo. It’s so in the pocket, it’s hung like Iommi’s engorged stash pouch on the gatefold of “Paranoid”. Damn: this has got to be the closest thing to 1970 period Funkadelic outside of “Chains And Black Exhaust” and, er, “Free Your Mind And Your Ass Will Follow” itself, come to think of it. 

“Cross Town Traffic” is a RIDICULOUS cover and not because it’s inept. It only roughly approximates the Jimi Hendrix Experience track in its shorthanded tongues and soulful misappropriatin’ and the way first verse is sang with the music resigned way to the background all dub-like and no guitar doing the “doo doo doo l’doo” ‘backing vocal’ call and response… Dammit: it is SO fucking loose I betcha Jimi hisself woulda dug how Chico slit it up such a furious treat (maybe even more than Dylan did when Jimi ran rampant all over “All Along The Watch Tower” and/or “Drifter’s Escape”) especially as Chico amends the line “And with you/I can see a traffic jam straight up ahead” speedily into “And I guess there’s no chance/for you to sit on my head!” thus shattering another blues metaphor in the process. This is ridiculous, all right: Chico’s version of “Cross Town Traffic” is an example of getting “it” effortlessly by just going for it whichever way you can and making it all fall together seemingly by sheer force of will and soul alone. “Pop Orbite” finishes the album as Chico and His Mag(net)ic Band get a full-on interstellar send off via the ‘effets techniques’ of Jean-Pierre Massiera as burbles, squeaks and Martian effects surround the band together on its final trudge into the abyss with accompanying Hammond organ and French screaming. All the album lacks is one big explosion FX to end it all. 

Do I need ANTHING else from a record? Fuck, man: “Chico Magnetic Band” stands tall as the spiritual column of that burnt pantheon of heavy truth seeking alongside the Vertigo pressing of “Black Sabbath,” Alice Cooper’s “Pretties For You,” Guru Guru’s “Hinten,” Silberbart’s “4 Times Sound Razing” and Speed Glue & Shinki’s self-titled double LP…..Head Heritage……~



Oh man I love this album. This lone studio record by the French psychedelic rock band Chico Magnetic Band is a total jackpot if you’re looking for some trippy, crazy and fuzzed-out psych rock record. The album is full of highlights and even that Jimi Hendrix cover “Crosstown Traffic” is good. My personal favourites might be “Lots of Things”, “To Where I Belong” and “Pop Orbite” but I can say that all of these songs here are impressive as hell. 

This lovely record gets five stars from me. In case psychedelic rock is your thing this album is definitely worth checking out. I’m a huge psych rock fan and this LP is one of my personal favourites. One of the greatest records to ever come out from France. 
Turn on, tune in, drop out!…by….CooperBolan…..~



There are a couple of items here that make “Chico”’s sole album special. One is the heavy handed use of studio trickery (phasing, radical dynamic shifts, backwards tape, etc…), a common trait found among early 70s French and German albums. Even more important, though, is Chico himself (real name Mahmoud Ayari, and originally from Tunisia). Chico is the vocalist, and it’s his ranting, raving, screeching, drooling, mumbling that makes this album so REAL. The listener witnesses a man on the edge – a true freakout captured on tape for all time. 

There are other albums where this can be found, and they’re all favorites of mine: Dawn on Brainticket’s Cottonwood Hill, John L. on Ash Ra Tempel’s Schwingungen, and Catherine Ribeiro on No. 2 (really any of her early 70s works). The psychedelics that are applied both externally (music) and internally (individual) allow the artist to apply his or her most creative mind gymnastics. Sure, it’s pure madness, but it sends a chill down my spine especially when paired with raging wah wah guitar solos and a cacophony of tribal percussion. 

It’s funny today to watch bands try to recreate this same sound. When it’s just the music, they do a good, sometimes great job, but when they try the “I’m crazy, here me rant” - they’re faking it. It was a one time of the era event. Everything else is just a simulation, a make-believe-let’s-pretend-we’re-freaked-out-and-nuts. And it sounds artificial. Get the real deal and check out Chico Magnetic Band…..ashratom ….~



My god, I’ve never heard such undecipherable English! Seriously, I’ve listened to this album so many times, and I’m beginning to think that maybe Chico just utters whatever the acid that’s infecting his brain deems sufficient. You can catch fleeting uses of English words if you listen closely enough, but even his rare moments of coherence are sabotaged by supplements of thick, sloppy gibberish. Very similar to Can, actually. But it sounds very strange for a band that worships Hendrix. The rhythm section reminds me of The Experience, but the guitarist plays just like the Stooges’ debut album. His very loud guitar mix, thick fuzz-tone, metallic riffing (“To Where I Belong”), and obsessively frequent stomping of the wah pedal all remind me very much of Ron Asheton’s brilliant style from 1969. The biggest difference between this album and the Stooges’ debut is the highly experimental atmosphere. Even though that usually translates into boredom for me, this band actually made even their most weird and experimental moments fun as hell by always including that fuzzy guitar. The only song without the guitar is “Pop Pull Hair”. It’s one of those “Woah, listen how trippy it sounds backwards!” songs that plagued psychedelic rock back in those times. If you reverse this song back into its original direction using an audio editing programme, it actually sounds pretty good. It’s very plain, consisting of just drums and echoey piano, but it has a very dark sounding atmosphere. 
Although I enjoy every track, I just can’t get enough of “To Where I Belong”. It starts as a folky sounding song with soft bongo drums, and then, without warning, changes into a slower folk song with a very ominously psychedelic lead guitar. After that part, the real song begins. It sounds like a nightmare acid trip from hell with a very loud and metallic riff. It always wakes me up when I’m feeling sleepy…..by….Andrupchik….~



What the holy smeggin’ sheep shit is this? I got this from a blog awhile back, which seemed to provide enough biography material to suggest that this band enjoyed a decent sized profile in their day, in their nation of origin. But this wild, wacky stuff for sure. Let’s dig in…“Explosion” could be off of MAGGOT BRAIN or ELECTRIC LADYLAND with it’s heavy, echoing psyched out sound. “Pop Pull Hair” (huh?) is dark ambient noise craft ala early Tangerine Dream. “Lot Of Things” starts off the same, but grows into a warm, wah-wah drenched fuzz fest. “We All Come And Go” is very busy, almost prog Hendrix worship with crazed drums and wacky time signatures. “To Where I Belong” is similar, but also features some trippy acoustic sections too. Pretty cool cut, ahead of it’s time for sure. “My Sorrow” is pretty much the most normal hard rocker on here, something Mountain could have easily conceived of. The Hendrix cover is so-so, while closer “Pop Orbite” (again…huh?) sounds like Jimi crossed with Hawkwind’s snyths. Okay, maybe it’s not as weird as I made it out to be initially, but it is awfully eccentric heavy/hard stuff for it’s day, very fuzzy and thick, then turning psychedelic moments later. I really like it a lot, and would encourage other fans of the era/style to find a copy…..by….cirithungol …..~



The Chico Magnetic Band is a group that features the explosive Mahmoud Ayari , or Chic o, for the intimate and not bad everyone, a French native of Tunisia and fervent admirer of Jimi Hendrix (hair and dress style at the support). No wonder we find a recovery Cross Town Traffic of Hendrix on the homonymous album of Chico Magnetic Band which appears in 1971 on the French label Disques Vogue. 

Born from the ashes of the ephemeral Lyons band Chico And The Slow Death, which was mainly devoted to coverings by Hendrix and other rock bands, the Chico Magnetic Band was born in 1969 from Chico’s alliance with singing and “performance related”, Patrick Garel on drums, Alain Mazet on bass and Bernard Monneri on guitar. As expected, the band offers from the start a rather heavy psychedelic rock drowned in guitar pads testifying to the admiration that its members bring to Hendrix . Chico will be noticed by the public, by his peers, and by the police and fire services because of his furious performances during which he will throw chickens alive in the crowd, take a bath in a basin installed on stage or to light a helmet covered with firecrackers smelling the halls that will banish it in turn. 

On the homonymous album of the Chico Magnetic Band , which is also the only long game that the band will release in 1971, we find some more experimental pieces that highlight the electronic collages of Jean-Pierre Massiera , including the pieces Pop Pull Hair and Pop Orbit . 

And it is precisely from there that emerges the question one hundred paces for Quebecers and one hundred bales for the French: who gives the reply, or rather screams the reply to the French anxious in the song Pop Orbite ? If you have not yet clicked on the video link at the bottom of this article to satisfy your insatiable curiosity, I summarize the subtle dialogue that we hear: 

- French anxious: “Also, but answer, say something, answer what!” 
- Quebecer not very receptive: “Eat carde!” 

Good. We will not embark on an attempt at psychosocial interpretation of this unfriendly exchange between so-called cousins, but we can still wonder WHO is the Quebecer of service retained to utter this end of well-received non-reception. And it is this question for the least trivial that launched me on the trail of Chico , Massiera and their links with Quebec. 

Parenthesis: if you have the impression to vaguely recognize the intro of the song Pop Orbite and many of the strange sounds that are heard, it is that they come from the One Note Samba - Spanish Flea from the album Kaleidoscopic Vibrations pioneered by electronics pioneers Perrey And Kinsgley in 1967 (herself a “mashup-reprise” of Spanish Flea by Herb Alpert and Samba De Uma Nota So by João Gilberto ); so far nothing surprising since Massiera frequently used this kind of loan to make her sound collages. 

But to go back to our main question, let us note at first glance that we do not rule out the possibility that it is Chico , Massiera or one of the Chico Magnetic Band musicians who imitates the Quebec accent; if so, it is frankly successful and we would like to convey our congratulations to the right. There is also the possibility that it is sampling; Would Massiera have extracted this “mange du marde” from a pre-existing Quebec recording? If you think you recognize the voice that invokes the invective or have any idea where it might come from, please contact us as soon as possible, because yes, we are still swimming in mystery. 

It is also important to know that Jean-Pierre Massiera came to Quebec to record some singles with none other than the sitedemo.cauctor and musician Tony Roman , founder of the label Canusa who will endorse Nanette , Les Baronets , Patrick Zabé , Les Hou -Lops … And The Maledictus Sound , in 1968, with Massiera . Massiera and Roman have therefore worked from 1968 to 1969, out some simple, with a little much for Marie-Claude , Artistic directors of Christiane Breton, Farewell / Weapons and Tears Richard ( Pasero ), and to prepare the release of the homonymous album Sound Maledictus and album Experience 9 of the same group. 

Apparently coming to Quebec with his own equipment since he considered that Roman’s was not appropriate, Massiera would have returned a few months later to France somewhat frustrated with his collaboration with Roman . Would he still have taken advantage of his time in Quebec to record an authentic “mange of the marde” in situ or would he have said to Chico when recording Chico Magnetic Band two years later? The bets are open and any information that can advance one iota this national survey is obviously welcome. 

The work and career of Massiera , musician and sitedemo.cauctor niçois obscur electronic music inspired by science fiction and horror films, could undoubtedly be the subject of a fascinating expanded work (notice to musicologists in lack of challenges), and in this respect, it is worth emphasizing the admirable work of the label Mucho Gusto Records which reissues pieces of Massiera since a few years. 

And to prove you that Massiera is everywhere, remember that he also collaborated with Claude Lemoine , sitedemo.cauctor of the Rockets with whom he cositedemo.cauira the album album italo-disco of Visitors published in 1981 (the first opus more prog / experimental des Visitors was originally published in 1974), whose title piece will be familiar if you played Grand Theft Auto V … Claude Lemoine who turns out to be none other than the father of Jordy . How good to keep in mind that we are all six degrees from Jordy , regardless of the roads, avenues and detours we take…..BY MARIE-EVE FORTIN-LAFERRIÈRE…….~



Born Chico and the Slow Death in 1969, the band was renamed Chico Magnetic Band in 1970 after their signing at CBS. On the other hand, what does the name matter as long as the madness of Mahmoud Ayari expresses itself! Between his baths in a bowl and his fireworks triggered from a helmet that he wears on his head … Chico plays with fire and water in an ever-electric atmosphere symbolizing wonderfully the creative energy of the 4 lyonnais in tune with their time and the repertoire of Jimi Hendrix , Spooky Tooth and other Tatse . This is also by recording 4 times Hendrix ( Spanish castle ’/ Is not no telling / Little miss lover / If the six was nine) that the band (then Chico and the Slow Death) began their recording career in 1969 on the obscure label 69 Records. So dark that the record never came out. On the other hand, under the name of Chico Magnetic Band they released a first 45r recorded and composed by Jean-Pierre Massiera, master of the French underground with his Maledictus Sound. It is after this disc and tired of the escapades of its leader that the guitarist Bernard Lloret leaves the group. He is replaced urgently by Bernard Monerri who has the honor to appear on the cover of the single. In July 1970, the band recorded their album in 3 days in Paris and went on tour. A tour that goes through the festival of Aix en Provence and a famous concert in Colmar opening Rare Bird and Mongo Jerry. The English press even ends up talking about the band. The tour finished, Bernard Monerri returns to his first love ( Beast ) and is successively and briefly replaced by Jean-Marc Goldstein, Paul Farges (ex Triangle ) and Joel Moulin (future Gold). It was not until June 1971 that the self-titled album finally came out at Vogue, illustrating less the Hendrixian scenic madness than a progressive pop with multiple solos of guitars. Two months later, members of Chico Magnetic Band moved into a community (the former house of Variations Joe Lebb and Jacques Grande) near Paris facilitating their concerts in several small Parisian halls at that time as the Gibus, the Rock ‘n'Roll Circus and Golf Drouot. The album sold badly, and after a last 45t just as deceptive, the band broke up in 1972 after a final concert in Roanne. History will remember that Patrick Garel, Alain Mazet and Gregoire Djevahirdjian (last guitarist to date) continue briefly under the name of Zizannie …..~




Chico Magnetic Band’s eponymus album, released by French Vogue subsidiary Box Office label in 1971, defines the term “Heavy Psychedelia”. These bunch of freaks, leaded by Algerian born Mahmoud “Chico” Ayari were clearly influenced by The Jimi Hendrix Experience but somehow they created a song of their own: violent, trashy, stoned as hell heavy psych featuring demented vocals, furious guitars, loud rhythm section and mindblowing studio effects including phasing, backward tapes, weird & groovy electronics…Eight killer tracks including their insane fuzzed- out deconstruction of Hendrix “Crosstown Traffic” and cult classics like “Pop Pull Hair”, “Explosion”, “Pop Orbit”… 
This reissue includes 8 bonus tracks (two more than the vinyl release) and features an insert with full band story and rare photos. Edition of only 600 papersleeve CDs…..~





Credits 

Bass – Alain «Jimi» Mazet
Drums – Patrick «cactus» Garel
Guitar – Bernard Lloret 
Vocals – Mohamed «Chico» Ayari





Tracklist 

Explosion 5:48 
Pop Full Hair 2:43 
Lots Of Things 4:40 
We All Come And Go 3:40 
To Where I Belong 6:16 
My Sorrow 3:07 
Cross Town Traffic 3:16 
Pop Orbite 3:44 
















LYON 1969-1972 


1969 
Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant (ex SOULFINGER’S) 
Bernard Lloret :Guitare (ex BLUES BUGS) 
Alain Fabrègue :Basse (ex BLUES BUGS) 
Patrick Garel :Batterie (ex HOMARD VIOLET) 

1969-1970 
Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Bernard Lloret :Guitare 
Alain Mazet :Basse (ex FOXY STROLLIN’ RETALIATION) 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Bernard Monerri :Guitare (ex AFTER LIFE / BEAST) 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Jean-Marc Goldstein :Guitare (ex CENTURY) 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

1971 
Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Bernard Monerri :Guitare 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Paul Farges :Guitare (ex TRIANGLE / ALAN JACK CIVILIZATION / CENTURY) 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

1971-1972 
Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Joël Moulin :Guitare 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 

1972 
Mahmoud [Chico] Ayari :Chant 
Grégoire Djevahirdjian :Guitare (ex FOXY STROLLIN’ RETALIATION) 
Alain Mazet :Basse 
Patrick Garel :Batterie 
Guest: 
Lahmi Saïbi [Puce] :Guitare 





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Ginger Baker

Ginger Baker

Country Joe & the Fish Woodstock 1969

Country Joe & the Fish Woodstock 1969

Sid Vicious

Sid Vicious

Hippie

Hippie

Bob Marley

Bob Marley

Jimmy Page

Jimmy Page

John Lennon

John Lennon

Jimi Hendrix performing “Purple Haze” at Woodstock Festival, 1969.

Jimi Hendrix performing “Purple Haze” at Woodstock Festival, 1969.

John Lord

John Lord

Pop Art

Pop Art

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan

Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

Mountain Woodstock 1969

Mountain Woodstock  1969

The Velvet Underground

The Velvet Underground

The Trip

The Trip

Rock n' Roll

Rock n' Roll

Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin

Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

Mike Bloomfield - Monterey 1967

Mike Bloomfield - Monterey 1967

The Beatles Abbey Road

The Beatles Abbey Road

Janis Joplin Festival Express

Janis Joplin   Festival Express

Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd

Velvet Underground & Nico Verve Records V-5008 1967

Velvet Underground & Nico Verve Records V-5008 1967

Pompeii 1972

Pompeii 1972

Captain Beefheart

Captain Beefheart

Acid Test

Acid Test

Acid Test

Acid Test

Jimi Hendrix Woodstock 1969

Jimi Hendrix Woodstock 1969

Grateful Dead

Grateful Dead