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Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Orchestra Baobab "Made In Dakar" 2007 Senegal Afro Pop,Afro Cuban


Orchestra Baobab "Made In Dakar" 2007 Senegal Afro Pop,Afro Cuban

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The legendary Senegalese band's first album in six years, consisting in part of re-recordings of the group's earlier songs, continues its impressive record of seamlessly fusing the traditional and the modern.
The music biz being what it is, Orchestra Baobab never quite got their due in the West. They disbanded in the mid-1980s, just as more and more people were growing aware that there was music being released all over the world, some of it-– gasp!-– not even in English. Still, the Senegalese group had it better than most. During their initial run, at least, Orchestra Baobab ruled West African pop, and their impact and influence were such the group eventually reconvened, at last getting the star treatment not just locally but around the globe. 
Orchestra Baobab's aptly titled 2002 comeback disc, Specialist in All Styles, encapsulated many of the ever-evolving group's strengths, in particular their knack for musical assimilation. Equally informed by Cuban and indigenous African musics, not to mention hybrids like Congolese rumba and Senegal's own pop strain mbalax, the disc found them picking up where they left off. Six years later, Made in Dakar continues the voyage with still more seamless style blending. Of course, nothing here is as crass as, say, rap-metal. Orchestra Baobab's fusion is far more subtle, and always rooted in traditional music. While world music elitists might prefer their sounds obscure, exotic, and mysterious, Orchestra Baobab is so smooth, so deceptively accessible, that for once the liner notes actually significantly enhance the listening experience. 

We learn that the lead track, "Pape Ndiaye", stretches back to 1968, and marked one of the first modern updatings of a traditional griot song. We see that "Nijaay" was first performed by Baobab back in 1972; the version here features a cameo from Youssou N'Dour, whose own stardom eventually came to eclipse Baobab. "Beni Baraale" is a tribute to Guinea's equally groundbreaking Bembeya Jazz; Guinea guitarist Baba Nabe joins Baobab guitarist Barthélemy Attisso in what amounts to a tip of the hat by way of ethno-musicology.
Each song here-- with vocals performed in Wolof, Portuguese Creole, French, and Malinke-- is equally rich in history, testament to one of the few positive outcomes of European occupation as they deftly incorporate soul and salsa, rumba and jazz, reggae and country, an exercise in cross-pollination made all the more impressive by the near invisibility of the threads connecting it all. That's ultimately what makes Orchestra Baobab such a joy: It's dance music, pure and simple, made for others to have a good time, easily appreciated on the basis of its musicianship alone (Attisso is particularly inspired throughout) but becoming more impressive the deeper you dig into what's actually being done......by Joshua Klein...pitchfork.....~


Senegal’s Orchestra Baobab, having triumphed over changing tastes and a 16-year hiatus, are back with Made in Dakar, their first studio album since 2002's Specialist In All Styles. Featuring guest vocals from their world-renowned countrymen Youssou Ndour and Africando's Medoune Diallo, the set list encompasses songs from ancient griot sources ("Pape Ndiaye"), tributes to departed colleagues ("Nijaay"), Portuguese Creole influences from Guineau Bissau ("Ami Kita Bay"), sixties-era Congolese soukous ("Aline"), and Baobab's own mbalsa, which combines Ndour’s groundbreaking mbalax groove with salsa. But in any context, Baobab's Latin-North African-Afropop fusion never fails to emerge in the forefront, crowned by bandleader Barthélemy Attisso’s borderline psychedelic lead guitar, smoldering brass, percussion and vocal arrangements and always, a soulful way with a Cuban clavé. Hearing Ndour singing with the band he once inadvertently put out of business is an especially moving experience, as is the wonderful cover of "Beni Baraale," a Bembeya Jazz of Guinée standard, and Medoune Diallo’s peerless solo turn, which could melt a heart of stone. But with music of this quality, it’s pointless to list highlights. These guys never, ever mess up so picking favorites is a purely subjective exercise. Not to be missed, under any circumstances. --Christina Roden.....~


Released in England last fall to rapturous reviews, Made In Dakar has landed on many British critics year-end, best-of lists. The Guardian 
called Orchestra Baobab masters of an urban style that pairs rippling, fast-flowing guitar lines with impassioned vocals and sophisticated 
dance rhythms. These move effortlessly from rumba, reggae and highlife to more indigenous grooves such as mbalax and their own mbalsa, an infectious salsa hybrid heard on the track Ami Kita Bay. The Sunday Times agreed, declaring the group a walking compendium of West African music, saxophones and guitars rocking in rhythm over sinuous percussion. The sleek, jazzed-up funk of Colette - dedicated to Carlos Santana - is the work of a group that, in contrast to some of its rivals, knows no frontiers. London's The Mirror summed up the enthusiasm of both critics and loyal fans: The first album in six years from this bountiful Senegalese collective glitters and tingles with rejuvenating 
glee, confirming their status as the jewel in the crown of African pop......~


This is such a rich taste of the densely textured, sophisticated structure of African music -- in this case Afro Cuban. The key elements really stand out -- the polyrhythmic (many shifting percussive patterns at once) 
and falsetto passages. These elements are so present in the motown and pop music of the 60s. i keep thinking of the original Frankie Lymon recording of Why Do Fools Fall in Love, where he breaks into that angelic falsetto over the booming, chanting anchor of the bassline, which is SO classically African. 
These are rico suave , smooth , jazzy nightclub sounds from the ends of the earth -- the last bit of land of west Africa, ie Senegal, Cabo Verde and out into the vast Atlantic. Chilling in a historical context.....~


once again the orchestra baobab has done it. ever since i stumbled across their first release and then the pirates choice i have been hooked on this festive sound. when i saw this in the store there was absolutely no hesitation but to grab it and run to buy it so i could get home and play it. do i know any the players or what they play? no. do i know any of the words? no. does it matter that much? no. this is music that you put on and you just enjoy for whatever it is that they do and what they do is make wonderful music. would i recommend it to any and all? well the five stars should speak for itself. the guitar work, the percussion, the horns all combine into a very moving beat that pulls you willingly along. the vocals are very expressive and it all works extremely well this time too just as the other cds have. you will not regret buying this.....by.....andrew l'amour....~


Whoever coined the term "intelligent dance music" was probably thinking of digital basslines and tricky breaks, but the phrase will also do nicely for this set of newly recorded songs by the legendary Senegalese band. Orchestra Baobab, who reformed in 2001 after a 16-year break, are masters of an urban style that pairs rippling, fast-flowing guitar lines with impassioned vocals and sophisticated dance rhythms. These move effortlessly from rumba, reggae and highlife to more indigenous grooves such as mbalax and their own "mbalsa", an infectious salsa hybrid heard on the track Ami Kita Bay. The four vocalists - augmented by Youssou N'Dour for a new version of their 1970s hit Nijaay - are superb. Nick Gold's production and sequencing ensures we are never bored: there is always a new voice or groove around the corner. Star of the show, as always, is musical director and guitarist Barthélemy Attisso, whom I once compared to Hank Marvin and Mark Knopfler; that wasn't hyperbole.....John L Walters...Gaurdian.....~


When Senegal's number one cult band returned from the wilderness in 2002 after a sixteen year hiatus, most old fans were so thrilled they forgave the fact that their comeback album, Specialist In All Styles, relied entirely on reworkings of items from their admittedly glittering back catalogue, and found them a wee bit rusty in places. 

This second effort by Orchestra Baobab Mk. 2 comes in the wake of five years back in business as a working band and is the product of a tighter and brighter unit. Even if they are still leaning quite heavily on old material, it's generally songs that are less familiar to a non-Senegalese audience, often shedding light on their roots and influences. They're also revamped with a more zestful, live-in-the-studio feel, the band is beefed up by extra brass and percussion, and the new compositions are pure, vintage Baobab. 

As ever, their foremost instrumental star is lead guitarist Barthélemy Attisso, whose fluid but never florid licks continuously percolate through the music, occasionally emerging for exquisitely timed solo spots, as on "Aline" – a lovely relaxed tribute to Congolese rumba – and, more grittily on "Ndéleng Ndéleng". A driving piece based on the mbalax rhythm, it also features a strong lead vocal from the youngest of their five singers, Assane Mboup. If he sounds a bit like Youssou N'Dour, that's maybe because he's one of N'dour's protégés, and the two trade verses brilliantly on ''Nijaay''. 

Praise should also go to Issa Cissoko, who decorates his own gorgeously smoochy calypso ''Bikowa'' with an utterly beseeching solo. And what about percussionist Mountaga Koite, whose deft, insistent cymbal work powers the likes of ''Ami Kita Bay'' and ''Colette''? I could go on. The latter closes the album on a slightly unusual note – blending reggae, '70s soul and a dash of boogaloo into something like Senegalese ska. Yes, that is the Buena Vista Social Club's Jesus 'Aguaje' Ramos on trombone, but there’s no falling into the trap of gratuitous celebrity cameos. How could there be when Orchestra Baobab have so many outstanding talents of their own?...by....Jon Lusk ....BBC music....~


Senegalese pioneers restore luster of cosmopolitan Afropop classics 

"The Black Atlantic” is the term black British scholar Paul Gilroy coined to convey how the Atlantic Ocean has shaped the growth of black culture and identity. The ocean, Gilroy argued, hasn’t so much divided black culture as it has unified it. From the days of slavery to the anti-colonial movement to the dawn of globalization, black arts, ideas and politics have developed at least as much through movement and exchange back and forth across the water as they have in specific locales. 

Music is an arena in which this constant process of exchange has been especially sophisticated and clearly discernable. It isn’t just that Africa supplied the raw materials of rumba, mambo, jazz and blues. It’s also that, over time, African musicians have imported these musics back as finished products, only to reinvent them anew in a kind of organic cultural remastering. 

The lost/found story of Senegal’s Orchestra Baobab—which became a West African institution in the 1970s with its Dakar-inflected Afro-Cuban fusion—is an object lesson in Black Atlantic culture creation. It’s also a cautionary tale about the fragility of art—had it not been for the group’s near-accidental rediscovery by British world-music impresario Nick Gold, its sound might’ve been missed by everyone but those fortunate enough to have visited Dakar’s elite Coralia Club Le Baobab, where the group once served as house band. 

But instead, Baobab is experiencing a comeback that was launched in 2002 with classic reissue Pirates Choice and a new disc, Specialist in All Styles. This renaissance continues with Made in Dakar, the luminous new album that finds the group interpreting—with undiminished vitality—a mix of repertoire items and new tunes. Out on Gold’s prestigious World Circuit label, the record also enjoys the support of Youssou N’Dour, the Senegalese superstar whose studios hosted the recording sessions and who appears as a guest vocalist on “Nijaay.” 

But if N’Dour’s contribution and some of the old songs’ new arrangements introduce the hard funk of contemporary Senegalese pop genre mbalax, Made in Dakar is at its heart a throwback album. From the easy rumba of love song “Aline” to the pure Cubanismo of “Ami Kita Bay,” the sound is effortlessly groovy and deliciously mature, the kind performed, as Baobab’s members do, with perfect vocal harmonies and coat-and-tie stage dignity. 

More than that, it’s also a direct conduit back to the kind of Pan-African sensibility that marked the independence generation—those who felt the hopefulness of decolonization before global economics and domestic political difficulties moved the mindset, in much of Africa, toward one of crisis and survival. In the polyglot African-unity spirit of the ’60s and ’70s, the lyrics of Made in Dakar are sung in Wolof, French and Portuguese Creole, and the themes include an homage to Amilcar Cabral, a fondly remembered Pan-African revolutionary. 

Other songs carry the social messages and behavioral advice common in much African pop (“Nijaay” is about finding harmony in marriage), draw on the tradition of praise-singing (“Pape Ndiaye”) or nod to life’s mystical dimension (“Sibam,” which refers to the trance-like condition induced by a sorcerer’s spell, doubling as a metaphor for dancing at a hot party). 

Nothing in this bill of fare, or in the band’s overall aesthetic, qualifies Orchestra Baobab as a progressive or edgy act. This is grown-folks music with a built-in nostalgia that makes it inherently conservative, especially when you consider the band’s origin: Le Baobab was founded in 1970 by Senegalese government officials as a place where the country’s new national elite could gather and socialize, and it was probably more accessible to well-heeled European visitors than the Dakarois hoi polloi. 

After the band dissolved in 1985, its members went on to wholly respectable, urbane careers: lead guitarist Barthélémy Attisso, for instance, is an established attorney in Lomé, the capital of his native Togo, while another bandmate is a college professor. 

But for the last five years Orchestra Baobab has been a working band again, with regular Saturday gigs at Dakar club Just 4 U. This not only gives Made in Dakar an in-the-moment energy that differentiates it from a more conventional reunion album—it also means that the members of the group have become, once again, active participants in a highly fertile local cultural scene where their brand of old-guard Afro-pop prospers alongside local mbalax and a growing trend toward hip-hop and electronica. 

The re-emergence of Orchestra Baobab is just one among several recent instances where veterans of the ’60s and ’70s have had the chance to revive the uniquely cosmopolitan and historically significant West African music of that time, not only for the benefit of Western audiences but also for younger ears at home. (Congo’s Kekele and Guinea’s Bembeya Jazz National are two others that come to mind.) 

And if Baobab’s hefty marketing support owes much to the world-music biz’s mostly white Western gatekeepers (the influential Gold was also an instigator of the Buena Vista Social Club project), this does not take away from the value and enjoyment of seeing this seminal act back on the scene. With any luck, the band’s success will spread to other near-forgotten African-pop pioneers, of whom there are sadly plenty....By Siddhartha Mitter |......~


Five years on from the GRAMMY nominated 'Specialist in All Styles', Orchestra Baobab return with 'Made in Dakar', an album that celebrates their roots in one of the world's most explosive musical cities - which updates their classic mellow sound with a new edge and a new energy for new times. Beautifully recorded in Dakar's Xippi studios, 'Made in Dakar' builds on Baobab's renewed activity on their home turf, where they've undertaken their first Dakar club residency in nearly 20 years with hugely successful Saturday night sessions at the Just 4 U club. Combining the gritty lo-fi feel of their early recordings with dynamic new arrangements, this is an album that could only have been Made in Dakar.....~


Since re-forming for the 2002 comeback Specialist in All Styles, this ’70s/’80s Senegalese band, like elder rockers Mission of Burma and Wire, remain incan-descent and relevant a second time around. Revisiting tunes from nights spent in steamyDakar dance clubs, Baobab’s merry but unhurried music braids high life with Cuban- flecked rumba (“Aline”) and American soul jazz (“Colette”), while updating the griot of “Ndéleng Ndéleng” with barbed guitar. Whether the songs are rendered in Malinke, Wolof, Portuguese, or French, Baobab perpetually play songs of love for their wives (“Nijaay”), their country (“Cabral”), and beyond words, music herself.....~


Ο δίσκος αυτός είναι προορισμένος ν' αρέσει από το πρώτο, άντε το δεύτερο άκουσμα, σ' ένα ετερόκλητο κοινό: 
- Στους περιστασιακούς ακροατές οι οποίοι έλκονται από τους εξωτικούς ρυθμούς, αδιακρίτως προέλευσης κι εκτέλεσης. Όλο και κάποια μάζωξη στο σπίτι θα ντύσουν ηχητικά με το συγκεκριμένο. 
- Στους "ψαγμένους" εραστές της "μουσικής του κόσμου" (ό,τι κι αν σημαίνει αυτό) οι οποίοι θα περάσουν ευχάριστες ώρες ανάλυσης των δεκάδων ρυθμών που παρελαύνουν από τα τραγούδια του. Έμαθες κάποια στιγμή ν' αναγνωρίζεις το mbalax, η μόδα του οποίου έβγαλε τους Baobab εκτός κυκλοφορίας στην πρώτη ζωή τους; Ε, τώρα μάθε από τα χεράκια τους και την παραλλαγή του, ονόματι mbalsa - και πάει λέγοντας. 
- Στους μουσικοκριτικούς, μια και τα ελαττώματα του δίσκου (παλιομοδίτικος; νοσταλγικός; προβλέψιμος;) είναι, όπως και να το κάνουμε, και προτερήματά του. 
- Στους ανθρωπολόγους οι οποίοι επίσης θα περάσουν ευχάριστες ώρες ξεμπλέκοντας τις αποικιοκρατικές ρίζες τού πλήθους διαλέκτων που περνούν μπροστά από τα αυτιά μας. 
- Σ' όσους νομίζουν ότι η Ελλάδα είναι ο Νταλάρας, η Κούβα είναι οι Buena Vista Social Club και η Αφρική ο Youssou Ν'Dour (μια και ο τελευταίος συμμετέχει σ' ένα τραγούδι). 
- Στους τυπικούς οπαδούς της world music που έχουν συνδρομή σε όλους τους δίσκους της World Circuit ανεξαιρέτως - πού να κάθεσαι να ψάχνεις τώρα. 
- Όσους χάρηκαν από το δελτίο τύπου και πίστεψαν ότι μετά από πλήθος συλλογών, επανεκδόσεων, live δίσκων κ.λπ., οι Baobab στρώθηκαν όντως κι έγραψαν καινούριες μουσικές (μην ψαρώνετε, τα περισσότερα παραμένουν επανεκτελέσεις και νέες ενορχηστρώσεις παλιών τραγουδιών). 
- Πιθανότατα σε αρκετούς καλοβαλμένους Σενεγαλέζους άνω των σαράντα (και με την προϋπόθεση ότι η World Circuit έχει διανομή εκεί και όχι μόνο στις πλουσιοπάροχες δυτικές αγορές). 

Οι πραγματικοί λόγοι της ευρείας αποδοχής: κατ' αρχήν ο ζεστός ήχος που διαπερνά το δίσκο από την αρχή μέχρι το τέλος του. Η παραγωγή που με προσεγμένο και μερακλίδικο τρόπο έδωσε στον ήχο μια αναλογική χροιά, αναδεικνύοντας ακόμα περισσότερο την αίσθηση ότι "όλα είναι στη θέση τους". Και είναι όντως όλα στη θέση τους όταν έχεις να κάνεις με μουσικάρες της κλάσης της Orchestra Baobab - δε φεύγει νότα, δεν ξελασκάρει μέτρο. Βάλε κι από πάνω την αίσθηση ότι είσαι στο ίδιο δωμάτιο με τους μουσικούς, ότι μπήκαν στο σπίτι σου από την κύρια είσοδο για να σου κάνουν μια επίσκεψη (η παραγωγή που λέγαμε). Πόσοι μπορούν άραγε να πουν όχι σε μια τέτοια καλοπροαίρετη αμεσότητα; Εδώ έχουμε τον ορισμό της μουσικής σαλονιού και στα δικά μας μέρη λίγοι θα παραμερίσουν πραγματικά τον καναπέ για να ρίξουν και μια γύρα. 

Όμως πόσοι από αυτούς που αναφέραμε ότι θα τους τραβήξει την προσοχή, θα τον πάρουν όντως το δίσκο; Πόσοι θα τον παίξουν όχι τη μία, τις δύο φορές που επιβάλλει η απόκτησή του; Για την απάντηση δεν ευθύνονται (μόνο) οι Baobab. Είναι χαρακτηριστικό όλης αυτής της παραγωγής ετεροχρονισμένων - μουσικών-ειδών-για εκτός-συνόρων-κατανάλωση να συζητιέται περισσότερο απ' όσο ακούγεται. Για κάθε Orchestra Baobab υπάρχουν δεκάδες άλλες εκτός κυκλώματος (=circuit). 

Η αλήθεια όμως είναι ότι το Made in Dakar ακούγεται και ξανακούγεται άνετα. Τα τραγούδια έχουν αρχή, μέση και τέλος κι αποφεύγουν από τη μια τις πιο αψείς αφρικάνικες επιρροές (πράγμα που λόγω προσωπικού γούστου θεωρώ μειονέκτημα) κι από την άλλη τις περιττές latin φλυαρίες (πράγμα που πάλι λόγω προσωπικού γούστου θεωρώ πλεονέκτημα). Υπάρχουν όμορφες μέχρι ευκολομνημόνευτες μελωδίες, όπως στο Nijaay, ένα τραγούδι κομμένο και ραμμένο για να γίνει το χιτ του δίσκου, και όχι μόνο γιατί ο 'Ν Dour το καπάρωσε για την αφεντιά του. 

Και αυτός ο δίσκος όπως και οι προηγούμενοι των Baobab, ξεφεύγει από το μέσο όρο των afro-latin επανεκτελέσεων κυρίως λόγω της κιθάρας του Barthelemy Attisso, τα σολαρίσματα του οποίου πρέπει να μπουν υποχρεωτικό μάθημα σε κάθε απόφοιτο του εγχόρδου. Ο άνθρωπος δίνει απλά τα ρέστα του σε βαθμό που μόνο και μόνο γι' αυτό αξίζει κάποιος ν' ακούσει το δίσκο. Τα wah wah και οι αντηχήσεις του δημιουργούν σε πολλά σημεία έναν ήχο προσιτό και σε αμιγώς ροκάδικα αυτιά. Μπορεί να μην ξεφεύγει τελείως (όπως στο παλιότερο άσμα Sibou Odia), όμως οι ροκοψυχεδελικές επιρροές του παραμένουν εμφανείς κι αξιαγάπητες. Θα μπορούσα να γράψω δέκα σελίδες για το ταλέντο αυτού του ανθρώπου, θα πω απλά ότι αν έπαιζαν όλοι στην ορχήστρα σαν αυτόν, θα έπρεπε να επεκτείνουμε την κλίμακα του 10 για να χωρέσουμε το αποτέλεσμα. 

Όχι ότι οι άλλοι παίζουν άσχημα. Τα πνευστά ξέρουν να πατάνε στις σωστές συχνότητες και εντάσεις (πράγμα πολύ πιο δύσκολο απ' όσο φαίνεται, όπως μπορούν να μαρτυρήσουν πολλά αυτιά ταλαιπωρημένα από τους ...σαξοφωνισμούς μοντέρνων έθνικ υβριδίων). Τα κρουστά δεν φαίνονται πάντα με την πρώτη ματιά, αλλά η διακριτικότητά τους δεν σημαίνει και έλλειψη νεύρου. Όσο για τις φωνές που παρελαύνουν μπροστά από το μικρόφωνο, αυτές είναι στα ίδια υψηλά επίπεδα που μας έχει συνηθίσει η ορχήστρα, έστω κι αν οι επικλήσεις στο πνεύμα του αδικοχαμένου Laye Mboup φτάνουν και περισσεύουν. 

Αν δεν σας περισσεύει ο χρόνος, εκτός από το Nijaay ακούστε το Pape Ndiaye για τη φωνή του Mboup, το Ami kita bay για το διάλογο πνευστών και κιθάρας και το Colette για το upbeat Blue Note soul jazz ταμπεραμέντο του. Αν πάλι σας άνοιξε η όρεξη, ακούστε οπωσδήποτε και το παλιότερο Bamba, την επανέκδοση δύο κυκλοφοριών της πρώτης φάσης τους. 

Συνοψίζοντας, να πούμε ότι το Made in Dakar είναι ένας δίσκος παλιομοδίτικος αλλά ακόμα κομψός, σαν το σεντούκι της γιαγιάς από τη Σενεγάλη. Δεν το ανοίγεις κάθε μέρα, αλλά όταν το κάνεις, όλο και κάτι του γούστου σου θα βρεις μέσα....Νάντια Πούλου......~


Comparing the Orchestra Baobab from Senegal with the Buena Vista Social Club from Havana is only partially correct. The similarities: The musicians are the backbone of the respective music culture, both groups interpreting, inter alia, Afro-Cuban rhythms, and both helped Nick Gold and his World Circuit Label for a second career. But that's it. What makes the orchestra so extraordinary is the high artistry of the musicians, who come from different music traditions, the fusion of these styles to a total sound. And all thanks to a unique, smooth interaction. 

The first career of the Orchestra Baobab ended in the 80s with the rise of Youssou N'Dour and his Mbalax songs. The band broke up, experiencing a first rediscovery from the reissue of their 80s recording session. In 2002, Gold and N'Dour brought the band back into the studio, and today they are on a world tour or, when they are on vacation, they play at home on the weekend - and every star who's in Dakar visits them on stage. "Made in Dakar" are classics from the repertoire and interpretations of African standards - no, that is more, it is a distillate of what makes West African music. 

"Made in Dakar" is the youthful production of a well-established band, synonymous with the diversity of West African musical styles and balm for the ear and soul.


Musicians: 

Balla Sidibe - vocals, timbales, drums 
Rudy Gomis - vocals, maracas, clave 
Ndiouga Dieng - vocals, congas 
Medoune Diallo - vocals 
Assane Mboup - vocals 
Barthélemy Attisso - lead guitar, chef d'orchestre 
Latfi Benjeloun - rhythm guitar 
Issa Cissoko - tenor sax (alto sax 'Bikowa') 
Thierno Koite - alto sax 
Charlie Ndiaye - bass 
Mountaga Koite - congas, drums 
Youssou Ndour - vocals ('Nijaay') 
Ibou Konate - trumpet 
Sanou Diouf - tenor sax ('Beni Baraale') 
Baba Nabe - rhythm guitar ('Beni Baraale') 
Jesus "Aguaje" Ramos - trombone 
Thio Mbaye - sabar drums 
Assane Thiam - tama (talking drum) 


Recorded at Xippi Studios in Dakar.


Tracklist 
1 Pape Ndiaye 3:41 
2 Nijaay 7:14 
3 Beni Baraale 5:51 
4 Ami Kita Bay 5:25 
5 Cabral 4:32 
6 Sibam 5:23 
7 Aline 4:05 
8 Ndeleng Ndeleng 5:40 
9 Jirim 4:48 
10 Bikowa 4:24 
11 Colette 5:08 


Discography
Orchestre Laye Thiam / Orchestre Saf Mounadem (1970, Ibrahim Kassé 3026) 
Orchestre du Baobab (1971, Baobab BAO 1) 
Orchestre du Baobab (1972, Baobab BAO 2) 
Orchestre Baobab '75' (1975, Buur BRLP 001) 
Guy Gu Rey Gi (1975, Buur BRLP 002) 
Senegaal sunugaal (1975, Buur BRLP 003) 
Visage du Senegal (1975, Buur BRLP 004) 
Aduna jarul naawoo (1976, Buur BRLP 005) 
N'Deleng N'Deleng (1977, Musicafrique MSCLP 001) 
Une nuit au Jandeer (1978, Musicafrique MSCLP 002) 
Baobab à Paris Vol. 1: On verra ça (1978, Ledoux ASL 7001) 
Baobab à Paris Vol. 2: Africa 78 (1978, Ledoux ASL 7002) 
Mohamadou Bamba (1981, Jambaar JM 5000) 
Sibou odia (1981, Jambaar JM 5004) 
Vol. 1: Senegambie (1982) 
Vol. 2: Ngalam (1982) 
Ken Dou Werente (1982, MCA 307) 
Vol. 3: Coumba Ndiaye (1986) 
Mame Diarra Bousso (1986) 
Yamdoulene (1986) 
Nouvelle formation (1986, Syllart SYL 83105) 
Specialist in All Styles (2002, World Circuit WCD 064) 
Made in Dakar (2007, World Circuit WCD 078) 
Tribute to Ndiouga Dieng (2017, World Circuit WCD 092) 

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johnkatsmc5,the experience of music..

gramophone

gramophone

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Music

Music

sound

sound

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

Crazy with music

Crazy with music

RCA Victor - Living Stereo 1958

RCA Victor - Living Stereo 1958

vinyl

vinyl

I Love Rock n` Roll

I Love Rock n` Roll

Music

Music

sound

sound